One Crisis Away

One in three North Texans can’t weather a financial storm that lasts 90 days. The problem's known as asset poverty, and it doesn't discriminate. A job loss, health emergency, even legal trouble is enough to plunge a third of our friends and neighbors into financial distress.

KERA's series One Crisis Away is following four families on the financial edge.  (Meet these families and explore their stories in our KERA News Digital Storytelling Project.) The series includes radio stories, videos, blogging, conversations on Think and a public forum presented by KERA and Communities Foundation of Texas , which was held at Dallas City Performance Hall on Thursday, February 27, 2014. 

Moderated by KERA's Krys Boyd, the One Crisis Away event featured an in-depth discussion on asset poverty with three leading experts: Andrea Levere, president, Corporation for Enterprise Development; Alfreda Norman, vice president and community development officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas; and Larry James, president & CEO, CitySquare.  Twitter discussion took place during the event using the hashtag #onecrisisaway.

Watch the full program:

One Crisis Away is funded in part by the Communities Foundation of Texas, Allstate Foundation, the Dallas Women's Foundation, The Fort Worth Foundation, The Thomson Family Foundation, and the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas.

A new study shows that nearly 50 percent of Texans don’t have enough cash available to stay above the poverty line for three months after a financial emergency. As part of KERA’s One Crisis Away initiative, Think host Krys Boyd examines why the numbers have jumped since the last scorecard was released with Andrea Levere, president of the Corporation for Enterprise Development.

Dane Walters / KERA News

When you don’t have a decent savings account or wiggle room in your budget, sometimes all it takes is an expense you haven’t planned for to push you over the financial edge. That’s reality for one in three North Texans, and that’s what just happened to Natalie Berquist.

The single mom living in Lewisville is one of the people we’re following in our series One Crisis Away. Natalie has a steady job, but because of a new monthly bill, she’s giving up her apartment.

KERA's series One Crisis Away looks at four families on the financial edge. Natalie Berquist is a single mom living in Lewisville. She had been staying in a one bedroom apartment with her son Samuel, but an expense she hadn't planned for means she can no longer afford her rent, and has to move out.

Dane Walters / KERA News

Just because you have a decent job, house and car doesn’t mean you’re financially set. Just ask Schnique and JC Dory, a White Settlement couple raising two kids.

They both have steady jobs, their home is pristine and there’s food on the table each night. But they’re constantly beating back debt, and are among the one in three North Texans who can’t last more than 90 days after a financial emergency.

That’s the focus of our series One Crisis Away. The Dorys keep their family on track with financial planning and faith.

KERA's series One Crisis Away looks at four North Texas families on the financial edge. In this profile, meet the Dory family. Schnique and JC are raising two kids in White Settlement. Even though they have steady jobs and a nice house, they're constantly beating back debt and working to curb their spending.

Dollars And Sense: How Can We Build A Better Nest Egg?

Jan 15, 2014

The new year is a time when we assess our lives, including our finances.

As part of KERA’s One Crisis Away initiative, certified financial planners Thomas E. Murphy and Crystal Billing appeared on "Think" to discuss what we're doing right and how we can better build that nest egg.

There’s more information about financial planning – and how you can select the financial planner who’s right for you – at the Financial Planning Association of Dallas Fort Worth website.

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Financial overhaul is a popular New Year’s resolution, right up there with starting a work-out regimen or changing your diet.

When you want to change your spending habits, where do you start? As part of KERA's One Crisis Away series, Courtney Collins talks about making a plan that actually works with a financial education coordinator, Leilani Lim-Villegas with the Texas Department of Banking.

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It's not just the pursuit of more money that can buy unhappiness. We could be funding our misery with the hard-earned cash we already have. 

Elizabeth Dunn, associate professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, studied how spending habits bear on quality of life for her book "Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending." We revisit her conversation with Krys Boyd at noon on KERA 90.1 FM for our series "Best of Think 2013."

UTA

When your neighbor buys a new car, your brother closes on a five-bedroom house and your boss brags about his trip to the Greek islands, it’s hard not to compare your life to theirs.

As part of our series One Crisis Away, which spotlights North Texans on the economic edge, here's a look at our compulsion to keep up.

Where's The Affordable Housing In Dallas?

Dec 24, 2013
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An investigation by the federal government into Dallas’ affordable housing practices has found that the city violates civil rights laws. This hour, Krys Boyd examined what the allegations say about Dallas with Scott Griggs, vice chairman of the Dallas City Council housing committee, and Ken Smith, who leads the Revitalize South Dallas Coalition.

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