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One Crisis Away No Place To Go: A Look At Life For The Families Already Gone

For months, residents living in weathered rent homes in West Dallas were told they had to clear out by early June. That's been the focus of KERA's series One Crisis Away: No Place To Go .

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The High Five

KERA takes a look at five stories that have North Texas talking — buzz from D-FW and across the state.

The Texas Tribune

Both chambers of the Texas Legislature voted Saturday evening to approve a $217 billion, two-year budget that would boost funding for the state's beleaguered child welfare agency, increase the number of state troopers on the Texas-Mexico border and avoid serious reforms to the state's much-criticized school finance system. 

Southern Rocker Gregg Allman Dies At 69

16 hours ago

Gregg Allman, founding member of the Allman Brothers Band, has died at the age of 69.

Allman's manager, Michael Lehman, told NPR News Allman had suffered a recurrruence of liver cancer five years ago, and died from complications of the disease.

A statement on the southern rock musician's website reads,

"Gregory LeNoir Allman

December 8, 1947 – May 27, 2017

President Trump has had, according to the White House, a successful maiden trip outside the U.S. But the bad news is he has to come home. Back in Washington, the ongoing Russia investigations await him along with another appeals court setback for his travel ban.

The Texas Legislature appears to be at a stalemate on a “bathroom bill” that could push the legislative session into overtime.

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The top local stories this evening from KERA News:

With only a few days left of the Texas legislative session there are still a couple big issues that lawmakers are trying to resolve.The House and Senate are working toward a compromise on property taxes and a so-called bathroom bill that would regulate which restrooms transgender people can use.

Texas Governor Jokes About Shooting Reporters After Signing Gun Bill

May 26, 2017
Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

Gov. Greg Abbott on Friday visited a shooting range to sign a bill into law that significantly reduces the cost to get a license to carry a handgun, making Texas one of the states with the lowest fee in the nation.

It was eight against one, according to German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

On one side, leaders of Canada, Japan, France, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom, plus two EU representatives. On the other side, President Trump.

And up for debate, the peril of climate change and the urgency of the U.S. commitment to the Paris accord to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Merkel said that everyone at the table at the G-7 summit in Taormina, Italy, was urging Trump to stick with the pact, according to Reuters.

From Texas Standard:

Five seconds and 50,000 volts – that's enough of a jolt to hijack your nervous system and contract every muscle in your body. Applying electricity in this way has become the tool of choice for police officers across the country. We're talking about conducted electrical weapons, better-known as tasers. They've rapidly moved from an obscure police technology, into the public consciousness. They've been hailed by law enforcement as a life-saving tool. But some critics say that's far from the case.

A school district near Houston has apologized after a 13-year-old student received an award declaring her "Most Likely to Become a Terrorist."

The award was one of several "insensitive and offensive fake mock awards," the Channelview Independent School District said in a statement, and the teachers in question have been disciplined, KHOU in Houston reports.

Michael Stravato for The Texas Tribune

As Pearland seniors celebrate graduation this week, 18-year-old Democrat Mike Floyd is preparing for his first term in elected office.

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One Crisis Away: No Place To Go

West Dallas has been on the financial edge for generations. And that's just now starting to change.

Latest from NPR

When avians and airplanes collide, we tend to hear the big stories — like when a flock of birds crippled the engines of US Airways Flight 1549 in 2009, forcing a crash-landing in the Hudson River. (All 155 passengers and crew survived.)

But thousands of birds hit planes in the United States each year, to less fanfare. “There are somewhere around 13,000 bird strikes reported to civil aviation and another 4,000 to 5,000 from the military, so it’s quite a few birds every year,” says forensic ornithologist Carla Dove.

Sherpas are extraordinary human beings.

In the high peaks of the Himalayas, members of the Nepalese ethnic group are famous for their speed-climbing records, ascents of routes that no one has ascended before, expert guiding and other skills.

What makes Sherpas so good at climbing into the wispy atmosphere of the world's tallest mountains?

Nearly every weekend since Inauguration Day, President Trump has flown from Washington to one of his homes outside the capital. Most often he's stayed at Mar-a-Lago, his private club in Palm Beach, Fla.

In April, he hosted Chinese President Xi Jinping there for a summit meeting, and in February he invited Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe down for a round of golf.

Trump has also overnighted at his golf club in Bedminster, N.J.

All the travel means a lot of work for the United States Secret Service, the legendary agency which protects presidents and their families.

When Mexican-American artist Nora Litz first talked with her students about immigration — she was shocked to hear how scared they were.

Receiving a diagnosis in 2017 — at least one made at a medical center outfitted with the latest clinical gadgetry — might include a scan that divides your body into a bread loaf of high-resolution digital slices. Your DNA might be fed through a gene sequencer that spits out your mortal code in a matter of hours. Even your smartphone might soon be used to uncover health problems.

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Here Are 39 Things You Should Do In Texas Before You Die

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a list of things you should do in the Lone Star State before you kick the bucket.

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In-Depth Interviews

History, science, politics, books and more with KERA's Krys Boyd.

Race, Poverty And The Changing Face Of Schools

Take a deep dive into how four different high schools in North Texas have changed over the decades.