One Crisis Away

One in three North Texans can’t weather a financial storm that lasts 90 days. The problem's known as asset poverty, and it doesn't discriminate. A job loss, health emergency, even legal trouble is enough to plunge a third of our friends and neighbors into financial distress.

KERA's series One Crisis Away is following four families on the financial edge.  (Meet these families and explore their stories in our KERA News Digital Storytelling Project.) The series includes radio stories, videos, blogging, conversations on Think and a public forum presented by KERA and Communities Foundation of Texas , which was held at Dallas City Performance Hall on Thursday, February 27, 2014. 

Moderated by KERA's Krys Boyd, the One Crisis Away event featured an in-depth discussion on asset poverty with three leading experts: Andrea Levere, president, Corporation for Enterprise Development; Alfreda Norman, vice president and community development officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas; and Larry James, president & CEO, CitySquare.  Twitter discussion took place during the event using the hashtag #onecrisisaway.

Watch the full program:

One Crisis Away is funded in part by the Communities Foundation of Texas, Allstate Foundation, the Dallas Women's Foundation, The Fort Worth Foundation, The Thomson Family Foundation, and the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas.

www.gotcredit.com

Your credit score controls the obvious (things like mortgage eligibility) and the not so obvious (like whether you can upgrade your cable package.)

Tony Milburn is on the board for Catholic Charities Fort Worth and works in wealth management for UBS. He talks about the sometimes startling impact of poor credit.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

For people battling back from an injury, or trying to live with a chronic condition, medical gear can be key to recovery. If insurance won’t pick up the tab, the cost can be devastating.

A North Texas nonprofit that’s part salvage yard and part repair shop is trying to bridge the gap.

born1945 / Flickr

Sometimes small expenses can completely derail folks trying to leave homelessness behind.

For people just getting into transitional housing, little costs like a work uniform or a car tire can be enough to put them back on the street or in a shelter. That's where "flex funds" come in.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Imagine trusting a stranger to make your financial decisions. For some North Texans, that’s the best possible reality.

The “representative payee program” helps mentally ill adults manage Social Security benefits. It helps people pay their bills. And when done right, it builds a bond between volunteers and vulnerable citizens.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Two North Texas nonprofits are teaming up to make the dream of home ownership a reality for a local veteran.

For this 55-year-old and his young daughter, a new house is the high point in a decade that’s been marked with despair.

KERA News

KERA’s “One Crisis Away” project and reporter Courtney Collins have won another national award – the RTDNA/NEFE 2015 Personal Finance Reporting Award. The competitors were public and commercial stations across the country – so it’s the biggest honor yet for the KERA News project.

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Too much credit card debt is sometimes enough to push people over the financial edge.

According to a new survey, three of the five worst big cities for credit card debt are right here in Texas.

Tim Hamilton / Flickr

KERA’s One Crisis Away project examines life for folks on the financial edge. Many senior citizens fall into that category. They might struggle with getting a job, paying for medicine, or managing wills and power of attorney.

That’s where Dallas County’s Elder Financial Safety Center comes in.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Veterans face many challenges when looking for work after leaving the military.

Dallas is one of the cities the Department of Veterans Affairs has chosen for a new program engineered to improve veteran hiring. North Texas companies are already on the job.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Landing a good job is especially tough with a newborn to care for. When you're a teen mom, it's more complicated still. That’s where a Dallas non-profit called Alley’s House finds its mission.

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