One Crisis Away

One in three North Texans can’t weather a financial storm that lasts 90 days. The problem's known as asset poverty, and it doesn't discriminate. A job loss, health emergency, even legal trouble is enough to plunge a third of our friends and neighbors into financial distress.

KERA's series One Crisis Away is following four families on the financial edge.  (Meet these families and explore their stories in our KERA News Digital Storytelling Project.)

The series is also exploring how the cost of living poor can be staggering, focusing on life in Jubilee Park in Dallas. 

Weekly installments examine financial literacy, from financial security for seniors to credit card debt. 

The series includes radio stories, videos, blogging, conversations on Think and a public forum presented by KERA and Communities Foundation of Texas, which was held at Dallas City Performance Hall on Thursday, February 27, 2014. 

Moderated by KERA's Krys Boyd, the One Crisis Away event featured an in-depth discussion on asset poverty with three leading experts: Andrea Levere, president, Corporation for Enterprise Development; Alfreda Norman, vice president and community development officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas; and Larry James, president & CEO, CitySquare.  Twitter discussion took place during the event using the hashtag #onecrisisaway.

Watch the full program:

One Crisis Away is funded in part by the Communities Foundation of Texas, Allstate Foundation, the Dallas Women's Foundation, The Fort Worth Foundation, The Thomson Family Foundation, and the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas.

Courtney Collins / KERA news

Two weeks ago, Rowlett resident Lindsay Diaz got news that her storm-damaged home had been demolished by mistake.

Courtney Collins / KERA news

The Dallas County community where about 100 people live without running water or sewer service has been approved to operate a water supply corporation-- a step toward bringing services there.

Lara Solt / KERA special contributor

KERA’s series, One Crisis Away: Rebuilding A Life chronicles families on the financial edge, trying to recover from the Christmas weekend tornadoes.

Lara Solt / KERA special contributor

A family trying to recover from Christmas weekend tornadoes got some startling news Tuesday.

Lara Solt / KERA special contributor

KERA's series One Crisis Away: Rebuilding a life, looks at tornado recovery for folks on the financial edge. It's estimated only 40 percent of people who lease apartments or houses have renters insurance. They need that money to buy food and pay the bills.

Maureen Barlin / Flickr

The homeless population in Dallas and Collin counties is up 24 percent from last year. That’s according to officials at Tuesday’s annual State of the Homeless address.

Lara Solt / KERA news special contributor

One Crisis Away: Rebuilding A Life follows four families on the financial edge, trying to recover from the Christmas weekend tornadoes.

Thorne Anderson / KERA news special contributor

KERA’s series One Crisis Away, Rebuilding A Life looks at four families left on the financial edge after December’s tornadoes. When the shelters close and the cameras disappear, recovery is only beginning.

Single mom Jenn Anderson had already rebuilt her life once. She picked up her two toddlers and moved to Garland shortly after her husband’s suicide in Las Vegas.

Lara Solt / KERA news special contributor

A dozen storms pummeled North Texas the day after Christmas, killing 13 people and destroying hundreds of homes. Nothing illuminates life on the financial edge like a tornado. That’s the focus of KERA’s new series, One Crisis Away: Rebuilding A Life.

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KERA’s One Crisis Away project looks at life on the financial edge. Today: our addiction to credit cards. A report from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston shows that despite the shaky economy, our credit habits are hard to break.

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