One Crisis Away

One in three North Texans can’t weather a financial storm that lasts 90 days. The problem's known as asset poverty, and it doesn't discriminate. A job loss, health emergency, even legal trouble is enough to plunge a third of our friends and neighbors into financial distress.

KERA's series One Crisis Away is following four families on the financial edge.  (Meet these families and explore their stories in our KERA News Digital Storytelling Project.)

The series is also exploring how the cost of living poor can be staggering, focusing on life in Jubilee Park in Dallas. 

Weekly installments examine financial literacy, from financial security for seniors to credit card debt. 

The series includes radio stories, videos, blogging, conversations on Think and a public forum presented by KERA and Communities Foundation of Texas, which was held at Dallas City Performance Hall on Thursday, February 27, 2014. 

Moderated by KERA's Krys Boyd, the One Crisis Away event featured an in-depth discussion on asset poverty with three leading experts: Andrea Levere, president, Corporation for Enterprise Development; Alfreda Norman, vice president and community development officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas; and Larry James, president & CEO, CitySquare.  Twitter discussion took place during the event using the hashtag #onecrisisaway.

Watch the full program:

One Crisis Away is funded in part by the Communities Foundation of Texas, Allstate Foundation, the Dallas Women's Foundation, The Fort Worth Foundation, The Thomson Family Foundation, and the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas.

Courtney Collins / KERA news

Working parents face a challenge when it’s time to find affordable child care over the summer.

No-cost and low-cost camps in North Texas can be tough to track down —and fill up quickly.

Courtney Collins / KERA news

Eating healthy on a tight budget can seem daunting.

Some North Texas community nutrition programs teach people how to stretch their food budget without sacrificing health and wellness.

Shutterstock

New Pew Research Center data shows the middle class is dwindling. It’s true in about 90 percent of metropolitan areas surveyed, including Dallas-Fort Worth.

Rakesh Kochhar from the Pew Research Center explains what that this means for North Texas -- and beyond.

Shutterstock

According to the Children’s Defense Fund, kids living in a family that makes $15,000 a year are 22 times more likely to be abused than children in a family making just $30,000.

The United Way of Metropolitan Dallas just received a $3.4 million grant to launch a program in June that’s focused on preventing abuse.

Cottages at Hickory Crossing

Fifty tiny houses -- dubbed the Cottages at Hickory Crossing -- will soon be home to 50 of the city’s most expensive homeless people.

Shutterstock

The Texas Association of Realtors reports home values in North Texas are up nearly 9 percent over this time last year. Though the economy is booming, Rev. Gerald Britt of CitySquare says that growth is leaving out folks who are barely making ends meet. 

Shutterstock

Some experts say service agencies working together-- a true holistic approach-- is the only way to get a handle on poverty.

A new Fort Worth program encourages families to think beyond that next paycheck, and make real plans for the future.

AleksSafronov / Shutterstock

A report released earlier this month reveals some uncomfortable truths about child poverty in Texas. For example while 1 in 4 Texas kids live in poverty— for black and Latino children, it’s 1 in 3.

KERA took a deep dive into the State of Texas Children, produced by the Center for Public Policy Priorities.

A new report looks at poverty through the lens of race and equal opportunityThe State of Texas Children, released Wednesday, shows one in four Texas kids live in poverty. For children in black and Latino families, the statistic jumps to one in three.

GotCredit / Flickr

For millennials just getting used to the tax code, some common misconceptions can lead to disappointment, and maybe even a big bill on filing day.

Pages