One Crisis Away

One in three North Texans can’t weather a financial storm that lasts 90 days. The problem's known as asset poverty, and it doesn't discriminate. A job loss, health emergency, even legal trouble is enough to plunge a third of our friends and neighbors into financial distress.

KERA's series One Crisis Away is following four families on the financial edge.  (Meet these families and explore their stories in our KERA News Digital Storytelling Project.) The series includes radio stories, videos, blogging, conversations on Think and a public forum presented by KERA and Communities Foundation of Texas , which was held at Dallas City Performance Hall on Thursday, February 27, 2014. 

Moderated by KERA's Krys Boyd, the One Crisis Away event featured an in-depth discussion on asset poverty with three leading experts: Andrea Levere, president, Corporation for Enterprise Development; Alfreda Norman, vice president and community development officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas; and Larry James, president & CEO, CitySquare.  Twitter discussion took place during the event using the hashtag #onecrisisaway.

Watch the full program:

One Crisis Away is funded in part by the Communities Foundation of Texas, Allstate Foundation, the Dallas Women's Foundation, The Fort Worth Foundation, The Thomson Family Foundation, and the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas.

Shutterstock

Too much credit card debt is sometimes enough to push people over the financial edge.

According to a new survey, three of the five worst big cities for credit card debt are right here in Texas.

Tim Hamilton / Flickr

KERA’s One Crisis Away project examines life for folks on the financial edge. Many senior citizens fall into that category. They might struggle with getting a job, paying for medicine, or managing wills and power of attorney.

That’s where Dallas County’s Elder Financial Safety Center comes in.

KERA News

KERA News received four statewide awards for its medical reporting this week. The Texas Medical Association honored Lauren Silverman with two first-place Anson M. Jones, MD, Awards; the station also  collected two runner-up honors. 

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Veterans face many challenges when looking for work after leaving the military.

Dallas is one of the cities the Department of Veterans Affairs has chosen for a new program engineered to improve veteran hiring. North Texas companies are already on the job.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Landing a good job is especially tough with a newborn to care for. When you're a teen mom, it's more complicated still. That’s where a Dallas non-profit called Alley’s House finds its mission.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

One of the biggest challenges for refugees once they relocate is simply making a living.

More refugees are sent to Texas than any other state in the U.S. Getting them safe and settled is a serious undertaking.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

A week-long camp for homeless children in North Texas will end with an official commencement ceremony at the University of Texas at Dallas.

Organizers want these kids to get the feel of life on a college campus and return one day as undergraduates.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

While violence is usually the big concern with gang membership, financial hardship is a consequence too. The Boys and Girls Club of Greater Fort Worth is working hard to remove financial barriers for gang members and former gang members.

drocpsu / Flickr

Every year, volunteers across the country pick a single night at the end of January to count the homeless. A report was released Tuesday about the results in Dallas and Collin counties.

Rick Holter / KERA News

New research out of the North Texas Food Bank's Hunger Center explores the link between food security and other financial habits. According to Research Director Richard Amory, data shows bad financial practices may actually cause food insecurity. 

Pages