What's Behind The North Texas Quakes? | KERA News

What's Behind The North Texas Quakes?

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

When a series of earthquakes started last fall, the mayor of Azle, a small town west of Fort Worth, thought it was a novelty. But Alan Brundrett felt more earthquakes, stronger ones -- dozens of them within a few months. He believes injection wells operated nearby by oil and gas companies have something to do with the quakes.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Bonita and Patrick Jones found their dream retirement home in Azle. It’s not far from where dozens of minor earthquakes started shaking the ground six months ago. Now the Joneses are worried about the value of their property and the environment. 

Texas Alliance of Energy Producers

Alex Mills is a company man. He heads the largest state oil and gas association in the United States. He’s based in Wichita Falls, 90 minutes northwest of the Azle-Reno area, where a series of earthquakes hit six months ago. This story is part of our series on “What’s Behind the North Texas Quakes?”

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Gale Wood worked on the Apollo 12 rocket program and later taught science to middle-school students in Fort Worth. But recently this retired engineer has been devoting his time to learning all about earthquakes.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Heather DeShon is a geophysicist at SMU. She’s studied earthquake sequences in Indonesia, Nicaragua, but also in North Texas -- in Cleburne. Now she leads a team collecting data in towns northwest of Fort Worth. 

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Barbara Brown is known to some of her neighbors as “The Digger.” She earned that nickname after collecting thousands of documents about oil and gas drilling, shortly after she says a swarm of minor earthquakes damaged her dream home, and those of her neighbors in Reno and Azle.