West Dallas | KERA News

West Dallas

Allison V. Smith / KERA news special contributor

KERA’s ongoing One Crisis Away project looks at life on the financial edge. Next week, we launch a series set in a neighborhood that’s been on the financial edge for more than a century.

Courtney Collins / KERA news

Dallas families bracing to lose their housing this June will get some money to relocate. The City of Dallas Housing Finance Corporation voted Tuesday to set aside $300,000 for families renting homes owned by HMK Ltd.  – homes that don’t meet housing standards that were strengthened last fall.

Courtney Collins / KERA news

There was some movement Monday in the case of 300 families slated to lose their rental homes in West Dallas. At a City Hall news conference, Mayor Mike Rawlings announced that Catholic Charities Dallas will start canvassing the neighborhood.

Gus Contreras / KERA News

Bon Appétit announced its list of 50 nominees for America’s Best New Restaurants -- and one of them is a family-owned taqueria in West Dallas.

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Lead contamination caused a crisis with the water supply in Flint, Michigan. But the CDC says at least 4 million households have children living in them that are being exposed to high levels of lead.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

No late fees, no due dates and no shushing librarians. Those are just some of the perks of the Little Free Libraries program. Several of them are popping up in neighborhoods across Dallas this summer.

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It’s been a huge week for West Dallas. Springtime crowds are flocking to the Trinity Groves collection of restaurants. And the neighborhood’s first grocery store, Cox Farms Market, opened Thursday. It’s the first opening at the Sylvan Thirty complex, which also plans to include apartments and retail space. For this week’s Friday Conversation, Sylvan Thirty owner/developer Brent Jackson sat down with KERA’s vice president of news, Rick Holter.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Can food revitalize an ailing neighborhood? In Dallas, global flavors seem to be playing a pretty big part in one area's transformation.

For decades, West Dallas was a ramshackle place: a Superfund site with a cement plant, some crime-ridden warehouses and a modest Latino neighborhood known as La Bajada across a potholed two-lane bridge from glittery downtown.

Now there's a soaring new bridge, the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge, that some called the "Bridge to Nowhere." But with a dozen new restaurants, nowhere is becoming somewhere.

Can food revitalize an ailing neighborhood? In Dallas, global flavors seem to be playing a pretty big part in one area's transformation.

For decades, West Dallas was a ramshackle place: a Superfund site with a cement plant, some crime-ridden warehouses and a modest Latino neighborhood known as La Bajada across a potholed two-lane bridge from the glittery downtown.

Jerome Weeks / KERA News

Dallas Contemporary opened four shows over the weekend, including one by Dallas artist Arthur Peña.

The show caps off what has been a productive period for the young painter who works in West Dallas, KERA’s Jerome Weeks reports on Art&Seek.

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