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water

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Texas is facing drought and a booming population. There's a unique project in North Texas that hopes to meet the state's growing thirst for water: A wetland. Wastewater flows through the wetland, where plants clean the water.

Commentary: The Tumbleweeds Are Back

Sep 4, 2014
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Don’t let the recent rains fool you. We’re still in drought and commentator David Marquis says there’s no reason to get comfortable.

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Five stories that have North Texas talking: a Plano man generates national buzz for his water balloon invention; legalizing gay marriage in Texas would generate $182 million in economic impact; David Sedaris is coming back to Dallas; and more.

Study Up For 'Think': Drought in the South

Jul 7, 2014
Anne Worner / flickr

Texas is big, hot and thirsty for water. Today on Think at 1 p.m., conservationist Ken Kramer and Jody Puckett, director of water utilities for the City of Dallas, join Krys Boyd to discuss the courses of action the state can take to combat the continued water shortage.

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It’s natural to sweat more in summer, but also dangerous if you’re not careful. In this edition of KERA's consumer health series, Vital Signs, Dr. Alexander Eastman, Interim Medical Director of Trauma at Parkland Hospital,  explains how to guard against dehydration.

Ann Worthy/Shutterstock

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Some Texas cities only have 45-day water supplies; how effective is Texas’ death penalty?; the most popular baby names in Texas; and more.

Mark Graham / Texas Tribune

A Republican running for Wendy Davis’ state senate seat wants to consider changes to the $2 billion fund that lawmakers created to finance water projects. Voters approved the fund when they adopted Proposition 6 last fall.

David Chong / KERA News

When real estate developer Don Huffines narrowly defeated John Carona, Dallas County’s long-serving state senator, in the Republican primary, he promised to take a conservative, tea party approach to issues in Austin. 

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Dehydration happens when your body doesn’t have enough water to replace what’s lost during the day. You might associate that more with activity and heat. But Dr. Alexander Eastman, Interim Trauma Medical Director at Parkland Hospital, explains in this week’s installment of Vital Signs how dehydration can be a serious problem in winter.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

A million-dollar campaign by a political action committee and support from top elected officials helped grease the wheels for passage of Proposition 6, which creates a $2 billion fund to finance water projects.

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