Washington D.C. | KERA News

Washington D.C.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Update at 4:22 p.m.: Just six weeks ago, Aaron Alexis called police in Newport, R.I., from his hotel room, saying that he was “hearing voices” and that three men had been sent to harass him. NPR has obtained a police report about the call made on Aug. 7. Alexis told police that the three men were going to keep him awake by talking to him and “sending vibrations into his body,” the report said. Alexis told police that he had moved from one hotel to a Navy base and then to a third hotel because the voices were following him.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

They weren’t even born when Martin Luther King capped the March on Washington with his famous speech. Students at Paul Quinn College remembered that day in 1963 with a celebration of their own Wednesday.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Wednesday in Washington D.C., America will commemorate a speech that changed the world.

Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I have a dream” speech is just as powerful today as in 1963.

Dallas Reverend Peter Johnson was a skinny 18 year-old that summer, fresh from jail. He remembers every detail from his trip to the March on Washington where he heard Dr. King’s profound words on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

Johnson also remembers where he first fought for civil rights; on the river by his tiny hometown in south Louisiana.

Vijay Reddy

Chetan Reddy is the grizzled veteran of the Scripps National Spelling Bee, which starts today in Washington, D.C. Only this grizzled veteran is just an 8th grader.

Chetan, who lives in Plano, is making his fourth straight appearance in the national contest -- and it’ll be his last one, because next year he’ll be too old. So he's determined to retire with trophy in hand.