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NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Flickr

On Monday, millions of people across the United States will have the opportunity to witness a total solar eclipse. It's the first of its kind in 99 years.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas have built a small, inexpensive sensor they say can tip you off if you're at risk for Type 2 diabetes — the world's leading cause of amputations, blindness and kidney failure.

Stereometric / Flickr Creative Commons

Landscape architect Peter Walker is the inaugural winner of the University of Texas at Dallas’ Richard Brettell Award in the Arts. The $150,000 prize – the richest arts prize in Texas – was established by arts patron Margaret McDermott to honor Bretell, a distinguished arts professor at the university.

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A lot of us think rushing from task to task and packing our schedules is a necessary evil. It turns out being busy might be good for your brain. That’s the conclusion of a new study led by North Texas researchers in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.

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Every football fan knows about crime and punishment on the field. You break the rules? You get a penalty. A team of researchers including professors from the University of Texas at Dallas has tried to gauge the link between penalties on the field — and crime off it. 

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Three Texas schools made the top 100 in the U.S. News & World Report list of best global universities. And none of them are in North Texas.

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New research shows that children who often go hungry are twice as likely to have impulsive, violent behavior while growing up -- and later in life. Alex Piquero of the University of Texas at Dallas helped author the study, which is among the first to link childhood hunger with violence. 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Last fall, KERA reported on a new scholarship program at the University of Texas at Dallas. Students could win up to $5,000 solving challenges in a computer game similar to Minecraft. Meet some of the winners.

How UT-Dallas Transformed Itself Into A Top Texas College

Apr 11, 2016
Shelby Tauber / Texas Tribune

Longtime University of Texas at Dallas administrator Hobson Wildenthal has fretted for years that his university doesn’t get the credit it deserves. That’s why he was so happy last year after meeting a candidate for a tenure-track job.  

For New UT-Dallas President, Campus Carry Debate Is Personal

Mar 4, 2016
Photo by Shelby Tauber / Texas Tribune

At 64 years old, Richard Benson is positive that he has already lived through the worst day of his life. 

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Research in Texas shows for the first time that electromagnetic fields from things like cellphone towers and power lines can amplify pain in people.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Millions of kids play the computer game Minecraft. That’s inspired the University of Texas at Dallas to create its own game, something called Polycraft World.

Winners get more than bragging rights. They win $5,000 UT Dallas scholarships.

Center for BrainHealth

This week, the Center for BrainHealth at the University of Texas at Dallas is starting construction on a new institute – and it’s shaped like a brain.

Craig Chew-Moulding / Flickr

August in North Texas may not be anyone’s favorite weather, but it’s peak season for creative complaining.

Bemoaning the sweltering heat is almost a hobby during the summer. And just about everyone has their own, unique way to describe it.

Amanda Siegfried / UT Dallas

Carbon nanotubes are a kind of material that might be used for everything from reinforcing muscles to conducting electricity. A new variant of the substance created at the University of Texas at Dallas could unlock a future of bendable technology. Ray Baughman runs the NanoTech Institute at UT Dallas

ra2 studio / Fotolia.com

144,000 Texans sustain a traumatic brain injury each year—that’s one every 4 minutes. For those who survive there’s often cognitive and psychological difficulties, like depression or post-traumatic stress disorder.

Brett Chisum / Flickr.com

Look up into the night sky this holiday weekend and you'll certainly see some fireworks, but what goes into making these colorful displays? Amy Walker is a professor with the University of Texas at Dallas. She has her Ph.D. in chemistry, so she knows a thing or two about the science behind the boom.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

A week-long camp for homeless children in North Texas will end with an official commencement ceremony at the University of Texas at Dallas.

Organizers want these kids to get the feel of life on a college campus and return one day as undergraduates.

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The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery reports a 49 percent increase between 2013 and last year in what’s known as vaginal rejuvenation surgery. It’s the subject of growing controversy.

CERN

A device as complicated as the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland is bound to have a few technical hiccups. A short circuit stalled its reboot – and scientists aren’t exactly sure when it’ll be fixed. 

Nihan Aydin / flickr

Trying to remember a grocery list or a phone conversation isn’t always easy. And it turns out, there are certain thoughts that may make these types of tasks even harder.

UT-Dallas

Wichita Falls native Austin Howard recently became the University of Texas at Dallas’ youngest doctoral graduate ever. All of 22 years old, he earned his Ph.D. in physics last Saturday. 

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Last week, cyber attackers took on targets ranging from the White House to the town of Cleburne in North Texas.

Maximilien Brice / (C) 2005 CERN

Thousands of researchers around the globe are participating in what’s been dubbed the world’s largest science experiment – a particle accelerator in Switzerland called the Large Hadron Collider.

UTD

To boldly go where no man has gone before – is a phrase that usually leads to thoughts of exploring the stars, but in this case we’re referring to the deepest parts of the ocean.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

For the more than 30 million Americans with significant hearing loss, hearing aids aren’t always a perfect solution. Sometimes they’re too expensive, sometimes too tricky to use. At the Callier Center for Communication Disorders, a workshop helps people of all ages learn to maximize their communication skills – with and without technology.

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

Getting kids interested in science, technology, engineering and math can be a challenge for teachers. It can be even more challenging if the students are girls. That’s just one of the many topics that came up during a discussion about tomorrow’s workforce at Texas Tribune’s Symposium on STEM Education on Monday.

UT Dallas

You could try and improve your memory by spending hours online memorizing lists of obscure vocabulary words, but new research shows you might be better off picking up a challenging, new hobby – like digital photography or quilting.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

The second president at the University of North Texas at Dallas says his priorities include keeping tuition low and forging a relationship with employers who will help train students for high-demand jobs.  

President Ronald Brown talked with KERA's Shelley Kofler prior to giving his inaugural speech on Friday.

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Even if you don’t need to stay up late Monday night to finish taxes, you might want to. Starting after midnight there will be what’s called a “blood moon.” It’s a full lunar eclipse, and it’s the first of a rare series of eclipses over the next two years.

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