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The U.S. Supreme Court will hear appeals from two African-American death-row inmates in Texas, including one who argued his sentence was based on his race.

In Texas Case, Supreme Court Upholds One Person, One Vote

Apr 4, 2016
Todd Wiseman / Texas Tribune

In a unanimous decision released Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled to uphold Texas' current system for drawing legislative districts so that they are roughly equal in population.

President Obama struck a somber tone, remembering the late-Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia as a "towering legal mind" who influenced a generation, but made it clear, he intends to replace him.

"I plan to fulfill my constitutional responsibilities to nominate a successor in — due time," Obama said. "There will be plenty of time for me to do so, and for the Senate to fulfill its responsibility to give that person a fair hearing and a timely vote."

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

The Supreme Court is taking on its first abortion case in eight years, a dispute over state regulation of abortion clinics.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

In Texas, the debate over same-sex marriage has spilled out of county courthouses and into public libraries across Dallas-Fort Worth.

Andrea Parrish-Geyer / flickr.com

The Supreme Court may have legalized same-sex marriage on Friday, but for some gay and lesbian couples in Texas, getting a marriage license isn’t so simple.

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An obituary following his death June 20 called Daniel Weiser arguably the most powerful Dallas political figure who never sought elected office. Journalist Bob Ray Sanders explains in this commentary why voters in recent Dallas elections owe him a thank you.

Supreme Court of The United States

The Supreme Court says it will dive back into the fight over the use of race in admissions at the University of Texas, a decision that presages tighter limits on affirmative action in higher education.

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Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is urging county clerks to not immediately start issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples if the U.S. Supreme Court rules that gay marriage is legal.

Civil rights groups won a victory Thursday, as the Supreme Court ruled that claims of racial discrimination in housing cases shouldn't be limited by questions of intent.

The court affirmed a Court of Appeals decision in a case in which a nonprofit group, the Inclusive Communities Project, said that the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs had contributed to "segregated housing patterns by allocating too many tax credits to housing in predominantly black inner-city areas and too few in predominantly white suburban neighborhoods."

Nicole LeBlanc / KERA News

In a case with Dallas ties, the U.S. Supreme Court has upheld a key enforcement tool used by the Obama administration and civil rights groups to fight housing bias.

Supreme Court: Texas Can Ban Confederate License Plates

Jun 18, 2015
Photo illustration by Todd Wiseman / Texas Tribune

The U.S. Supreme Court has backed Texas’ decision to forbid specialty license plates sporting an image of the Confederate flag, a ruling that could have national implications for how free speech protections apply to government services.

Todd Wiseman/Bob Daemmrich / The Texas Tribune

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to hear a case that centers on how Texas draws its political districts, a longtime point of dispute between the state and voting rights advocates.

Special to KERA News/Nicole LeBlanc

Update: Civil rights advocates say a Texas case that came before the U.S. Supreme Court Wednesday could weaken the Fair Housing Act of 1968

With Supreme Court To Weigh Gay Marriage, What Now For Texas?

Jan 16, 2015
Katie Harbath / The Texas Tribune

The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to hear four cases with the potential to legalize gay marriage nationwide will impact Texas' own legal fight over same-sex unions. But how exactly is unclear. 

Ben Philpott / KUT/Texas Tribune

The Supreme Court on Tuesday blocked key parts of a 2013 law in Texas that had closed all but eight facilities providing abortions in America's second most-populous state.

Ben Philpott / KUT/Texas Tribune

The Supreme Court on Tuesday blocked key parts of a 2013 law in Texas that had closed all but eight facilities providing abortions in the state.

Cruz: Amend U.S. Constitution To Preserve Marriage Bans

Oct 6, 2014
Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

Hours after the U.S. Supreme Court paved the way for same-sex marriage bans to be lifted in five states, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz called Monday for amending the U.S. Constitution to prevent either the federal government or the U.S. Supreme Court from overturning a state's ban on same-sex marriage.

The Supreme Court has ruled that family owned and other closely held companies can opt out of the Affordable Care Act's provisions for no-cost prescription contraception in most health insurance if they have religious objections.

The owners of the Hobby Lobby chain of arts and crafts stores and those of another closely held company, Conestoga Wood Specialties Corp., had objected on the grounds of religious freedom.

The ruling affirms a Hobby Lobby victory in a lower court and gives new standing to similar claims by other companies.

Updated at 10:48 a.m. ET

The Supreme Court ruled Monday that some public employees cannot be required to contribute to unions.

In a 5-4 ruling split along ideological lines, the court recognized a category of "partial public employees" who cannot be required to contribute union bargaining fees. The court said the current practice, which permits automatic deductions, violates the First Amendment rights of those nonmembers who disagree with the union's positions.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down an overall cap on the amount that large campaign donors can give to parties and candidates in a two-year election cycle.

In a 5-4 decision split between conservatives and liberals on the high court, the court said the limits were a violation of the First Amendment.

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A sharply divided Supreme Court on Tuesday allowed Texas to continue enforcing abortion restrictions that opponents say have led more than a third of the state's clinics to stop providing abortions.

The justices voted 5-4 to leave in effect a provision requiring doctors who perform abortions in clinics to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital.

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A white woman who claims the University of Texas improperly denied her admission because of race is getting a second hearing today before a federal appeals court.
 
The U.S. Supreme Court ordered the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals to take another look at whether the school's race-based admissions policy remains necessary to ensure a diverse student body.

Attorney General Greg Abbott, a GOP candidate for governor, is tweeting his approval of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to hear Texas' arguments against EPA rules for regulating greenhouse gases.

Texas Attorney General's Office

The U.S. Attorney General took aim at the Lone Star State yesterday, and his Texas counterpart reacted. Eric Holder and Greg Abbott strongly disagree over the Voting Rights Act.

          

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Update, 12:40 p.m.:  In Dallas, some gay rights advocates called the Supreme Court's ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act a partial victory because states like Texas do not recognize same-sex marriages. However, Texas couples who were married in other states will now be eligible for federal benefits.

"While the SCOTUS ruled against federal discrimination, they left state discrimination in place," Lynn Walters, Executive Director of Hope for Peace and Justice, said in a press release. "While it is a partial victory, it means that far too many same gender couples will continue to suffer discrimination in a state like Texas."

 

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Next time you go to the polls to vote in Texas, you might need to bring ID. Today, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act that makes it possible for the state to move forward with controversial laws, like voter ID and redistricting.

By a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court has struck down a key provision of the landmark 1965 Voting Rights Act that establishes a formula to identify states that may require extra scrutiny by the Justice Department regarding voting procedures.

The decision focuses on Section 4 of the Act.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

After more than six years in court that cost more than $6 million the Tarrant Regional Water District’s legal battle with the State of Oklahoma has ended.

Texasrobo / flick.com

The US Supreme Court today,  in a unanimous decision, shut down the Tarrant Regional Water District's plan to import water from Oklahoma.

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