U.S. Supreme Court | KERA News

U.S. Supreme Court

Updated at 8:10 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court will allow the Trump administration to fully enforce its revised ban on allowing entry to the United States by residents of eight countries while legal challenges are heard by a federal appeals court.

Six of the countries — Syria, Libya, Iran, Yemen, Chad and Somalia — are majority-Muslim nations. The other two are North Korea and Venezuela.

Tamir Kalifa / Texas Tribune

Denying the city of Houston’s request, the U.S. Supreme Court will not review a June decision by the Texas Supreme Court, which ruled that the landmark decision legalizing same-sex marriage does not fully address the right to marriage benefits.

Every Supreme Court term there is at least one case that gets people's blood up. A case on which just about everyone has an opinion, often a ferocious opinion. That case comes before the justices Tuesday.

Updated on Oct. 4 at 7 p.m. ET

Keith Gaddie has "hung up his spurs."

The election expert from the University of Oklahoma no longer helps state legislatures draw new district lines to maximize their partisan advantage.

He was still wearing those spurs in 2011 when he provided data that helped Wisconsin Republicans enact a legislative redistricting plan aimed at maximizing their power for the foreseeable future.

But now he has reversed course and filed a brief in the U.S. Supreme Court arguing that the practice is undemocratic.

If last year's Supreme Court term was so dry of interesting cases that it looked like a desert, this term, which opens Monday, already looks like a tropical rainforest. And the justices are only halfway to filling up their docket.

Already scheduled are major test cases on a raft of controversial issues such as partisan gerrymandering, privacy in an age of technology, sports betting and much more, including a case that pits the right of a same-sex couple to buy a specially created wedding cake against the right of a cake creator and his bakery to refuse.

The Supreme Court added 11 cases to its term that begins next week, agreeing to hear a pivotal case on unions that represent government employees. Other cases involve a range of topics, from searches by police to overtime pay for car dealership service advisers.

The newly accepted cases were announced Thursday morning — and so far, the union case, Janus v. American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, is attracting the most attention.

Tamir Kalifa / Texas Tribune

After the Texas Supreme Court ruled that the landmark decision legalizing same-sex marriage does not fully address the right to marriage benefits, the city of Houston is now looking to the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in.

The Supreme Court of the United States
Shelby Knowles for The Texas Tribune

The U.S. Supreme Court has dealt a serious setback to those hoping Texas would see new congressional and House district maps ahead of the 2018 elections. 

The U.S. Supreme Court will temporarily allow the Trump administration to block many refugees from six mostly Muslim countries without direct familial ties in the United States from entering this country.

In a brief order issued Monday, Justice Anthony Kennedy delayed implementation of a ruling issued by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals last week that would have allowed entry to refugees with formal ties to resettlement agencies here.

The U.S. Supreme Court did something out of the ordinary last week: It responded to an appeal when there was technically nothing to appeal.  

Jim Malewitz / The Texas Tribune

If Gov. Greg Abbott calls a second special legislative session this summer, it won’t be for redistricting.

Updated June 29 at 1:20 p.m. ET

The Trump administration outlined Thursday how it will implement its modified travel ban, following the Supreme Court's decision on Monday lifting a stay on the executive order imposed by two lower courts.

The U.S. Supreme Court says it will re-hear a case that asks whether immigrants detained by the government have a right to a bond hearing to challenge their indefinite detention.

The case was argued in November 2016, months before Justice Neil Gorsuch filled the vacant seat of late Justice Antonin Scalia.

Can the family of a slain Mexican teenager sue the federal agent who shot him across the U.S.-Mexico border for damages? The U.S. Supreme Court did not answer this question on Monday, instead opting to send a case back to a lower court.

The case centers on a larger question: whether the Constitution extends protection to an individual who is killed on foreign soil, even though that person is standing just a few yards outside the United States.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

President Trump's administration filed a petition with the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday night seeking to reverse rulings by lower courts in Hawaii and Maryland that blocked a temporary ban on travel to the United States from six majority-Muslim countries.

The Trump administration says the Constitution gives the president "broad authority to prevent aliens abroad from entering this country when he deems it in the nation's interest."

The newest member of the Supreme Court celebrated his swearing-in with a public ceremony in the White House Rose Garden Monday morning. Neil Gorsuch will cement the conservative 5-4 majority on the high court, delivering on a key campaign promise of President Trump.

"I've always heard that the most important thing that a president of the United States does is appoint people — hopefully great people like this appointment — to the United States Supreme Court," Trump said. "And I got it done in the first 100 days."

Joshua Roberts / Reuters

NPR Politics team is following the Senate Judiciary Committee's hearings on the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court this week.

Because of racial bias, actor Selmore Haines III left the theater for 30 years. Now, he's back in Jubilee Theatre's one-man show
Jubilee Theatre

Fort Worth’s Jubilee Theatre is tackling the life of Justice Thurgood Marshall. And actor Selmore Haines III is starring in the one-man show. As Marshall was fighting discrimination, Haines was experiencing it – and it almost kept him from becoming an actor.

U.S. Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of Texas Death Row Inmate

Feb 22, 2017
Texas Department of Criminal Justice

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a Texas death row inmate Wednesday morning, agreeing that Duane Buck’s case was prejudiced by an expert trial witness who claimed Buck was more likely to be a future danger because he is black.

From Texas StandardThis story originally aired on Nov. 11, 2016, and has been updated throughout.

Most parts of a president’s legacy are murky. It can be hard to identify an administration’s long-term effect on the economy or the environment, but the Supreme Court is a different story.

On Jan. 20, 2016, exactly a year before a new president would be sworn into office, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia announced the court's 8-to-1 decision reinstating the death penalty for two Kansas brothers.

It was the last time the 79-year-old Scalia would announce an opinion. Three weeks later, on a hunting trip in Texas, the conservative icon died in his sleep.

Samantha Guzman

Justice Stephen Breyer has served on the Supreme Court for more than 20 years. On Think, Krys Boyd talked with him about his career on the bench and his book “The Court and the World: American Law and the New Global Realities.”

With just days until the election, some Senate Republicans are suggesting that when it comes to the Supreme Court, eight is enough. Eight justices, that is.

For the first time, some Senate Republicans are saying that if Hillary Clinton is elected, the GOP should prevent anyone she nominates from being confirmed to fill the current court vacancy, or any future vacancy.

Kevin Lamarque / Reuters

The legal battle to defend Texas' 2013 abortion restrictions — which the U.S. Supreme Court struck down as unconstitutional on Monday — cost Texas taxpayers more than $1 million, according to records obtained by The Texas Tribune.

Shutterstock

The U.S. Supreme Court is taking up a dispute involving deaf people in Texas who say driver instruction schools in the state won't let them take classes needed to get a driver's license.

Lorie Shaull / Flickr

As soon as the U.S. Supreme Court tossed out the Texas law setting restrictive standards for abortion clinics, cheering and despair erupted from groups on either side of the abortion debate.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

The U.S. Supreme Court has struck down Texas' widely replicated regulation of abortion clinics in the court's biggest abortion case in nearly a quarter century.

Matt H. Wade/Wikimedia Commons

The two recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions affecting Texas had a few legal twists and turns. In this Friday Conversation, Lauren Silverman unpacked the two cases with SMU law professor Lackland Bloom on Think.

Gus Contreras/KERA News

The top local stories this morning from KERA News: Two of yesterday’s U.S. Supreme Court decisions came out of Texas.

Gus Contreras / KERA News

Following the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision essentially blocking President Obama’s plan to help millions of immigrants attain legal status, dozens of protesters gathered in downtown Dallas for a march to City Hall.

Pages