TXdecides | KERA News

TXdecides

Texas Decides is a project from the Texas Station Collaborative, which includes KERA, KUT in Austin, Texas Public Radio in San Antonio, Marfa Public Radio and Houston Public Media. 

The project started in the fall of 2016. Leading up to the election, public radio stations across Texas asked listeners to submit questions related to national, statewide and local politics. After listeners voted on their favorite questions, reporters tackled everything from why Texas is so red to why voter turnout is so low in the state.

At the start of the 85th Legislature, stations teamed up again to ask listeners to submit questions they have about the complicated lawmaking process in Texas. After listeners vote to narrow down to their most pressing questions, reporters will explore them to find the answers. Stories will be published throughout the remainder of the session this spring. 

See all stories from the "Texas Decides" project below.

The Texas Legislature gaveled in just a few short weeks ago. And, while lawmakers typically wait until the waning weeks of the session to get anything done, we're answering some of your questions about what goes on under the granite dome for our TXDecides project.

The Texas Legislature gaveled in just a few short weeks ago. And, while lawmakers typically wait until the waning weeks of the session to get anything done, we're answering some of your questions about what goes on under the granite dome for our TXDecides project.

Today’s question comes from Gerryl Krilic:

When a bill is presented, what is the process? How many votes required to pass a bill?

Texas Station Collaborative

For the last few weeks, we’ve been asking what you wanted to know about the Texas Legislature: How it works, why it works the way it does and what you want lawmakers to do.  

The Texas Legislature gaveled in just a few short weeks ago. And, while lawmakers typically wait until the waning weeks of the session to get anything done, we're answering some of your questions about what goes on under the granite dome for our TXDecides project.

Today's question comes from Sammi Curless: 

What powers to govern are assigned to the governor versus the lieutenant governor versus the Texas Legislature?

The Texas Legislature gaveled in just a few short weeks ago. And, while lawmakers typically wait until the waning weeks of the session to get anything done, we're answering some of your questions about what goes on under the granite dome for our TXDecides project.

Paul Woolrich via flickr

While Donald Trump won Texas handily, Hillary Clinton won most of the state’s big cities. Dallas County went blue by a big margin, and Democrats dominated local races. While they flipped a handful of state house seats, Democrats fell short of the gains they had hoped for. In Dallas County, just one seat moved from red to blue.

Samantha Guzman / KERA News

The excitement at the Dallas County GOP watch party cranked up a notch each time a state was called for Donald Trump. Republican leaders and GOP supporters celebrated a race that stunned them all.

A ballroom at the Westin Dallas Park Central erupted with cheers each time Donald Trump’s electoral vote total ticked up.

Last week we launched TXDecides, our collaborative project with public radio newsrooms across the state. The goal was simple: Answer Texas voters' questions ahead of Election Day. Y'all had lots of questions. So many, in fact, that we had to pare down the questions to a scant five.

Luckily, we culled some of the remaining questions and decided to answer them as best we could. 

Since 1972, Texas has had a lower voter turnout rate than the national rate for presidential elections.

Jacqueline Mermea / The Texas Tribune

Any registered voter may vote early in person. To vote early by mail, applications for a ballot were due Oct. 28. To get your vote counted, submit your completed mail-in ballot to your county's voter registrar office by 7 p.m. on Election Day, Nov. 8.

Why Is Voter Turnout So Low In Texas?

Oct 28, 2016
Erik Hersman / Flickr

In recent years, voter turnout in Texas has been...well, let’s just say not everything is bigger here. State voter turnout has been below the national average for the past few decades, regularly falling below 50 percent.

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