stroke | KERA News

stroke

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Atrial fibrillation, a irregular heartbeat, affected more than 33-million people globally in 2010.

A new study says atrial fibrillation appears to be a stronger risk factor for heart disease and death in women than in men.

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About 120 over 80 is considered normal blood pressure. But blood pressure can run higher as you get older – around 140.  Doctors wanting to lower that systolic number finally have an ideal target thanks to a study of more than 9,300 seniors called SPRINT.

UT-Southwestern Medical Center

Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the U.S. – it kills almost 130,000 Americans each year. Getting the right treatment as quickly as possible is key. 

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It’s been recommended for some time that a low-dose aspirin a day helps to avoid heart attack and stroke. But a study out last month in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology suggests some people take the drug "inappropriately."

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On average, every four minutes someone dies of a stroke.

Strokes are also the leading cause of long-term disability in the U.S. But technological and medical advances can help diagnose a stroke early. And early diagnosis and treatment for strokes can mean the difference between life and death.

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Stroke has a large negative impact on society, with women disproportionately affected. An estimated 6.8 million people in the United States are living after having had a stroke, including 3.8 million women and three million men. Stroke is the fifth-leading cause of death for men, but the third leading cause for women. So says the American Heart Association this month in its newly released guidelines for prevention of stroke in women.

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In this installment of KERA’s Vital Signs, we revisit the subject of stroke. A study last month in the Lancet pointed to an increase in stroke among younger adults. Dr. Ben Newman, an endovascular neurosurgeon at Methodist Dallas Medical Center, talked with Sam Baker about who’s affected and why.

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When someone’s brought into the emergency room for acute ischemic stroke – or a blocked artery to the brain – a neurologist is called in to determine treatment. But back in 2010, Baylor Healthcare System noticed a problem at a regional center in Waxahachie: speed. The solution was a telemedicine program using laptop cameras and a robotic device to save crucial time in providing treatment. Dr. Dion Graybeal, medical director of the Baylor stroke program, talks about how it’s done  in this installment of KERA’s Vital Signs.

Signs of a stroke require attention as soon as possible. Doctors are using videoconferencing with laptop cameras and a robotic device to save crucial time. Dr. Dion Graybeal, medical director of Baylor's stroke program, talks with KERA's Sam Baker about the latest developments.

Can A Garbled Text Mean Stroke?

Jan 14, 2013

You probably get text messages often with misspellings and abbreviations.  But doctors say mistakes in texting  sometimes suggest a problem more serious than bad grammar.  

Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and the leading cause of disability in the U.S. The drug tPA has been pretty effective at dissolving blood clots that can lead to stroke. But that's only if given within three hours and if the clot isn’t large. The Food and Drug Administration this year approved two mechanical devices doctors can use beyond the three hour window to remove large clots from the brain. In a KERA Health Checkup, Dr.

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It’s the fourth leading cause of death in the country behind heart disease, chronic lung disease and cancer. Stroke occurs when blood flow to a part of the brain stops. It’s sometimes called a brain attack, but stroke is often preventable. In this KERA Health Checkup, Sam Baker talked about this with Dr. Dion Graybeal. He’s Medical Director of the Stroke Program at Baylor Medical Center.