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Southwest Airlines

Southwest Airlines Says It Will Stop Serving Peanuts

Jul 10, 2018

Peanuts or pretzels? Passengers on Southwest Airlines will no longer have to decide after the carrier announced that it plans to stop serving peanuts to protect people who are allergic to them.

"Peanuts forever will be part of Southwest's history and DNA," the company said in an emailed statement. "However, to ensure the best on-board experience for everyone, especially for customers with peanut-related allergies, we've made the difficult decision to discontinue serving peanuts on all flights beginning August 1st."

A Southwest jetliner was hit with a "pressurization issue in flight," the airline says, resulting in oxygen masks dropping and a warning to ground personnel to have paramedics ready when the plane landed at Dallas Love Field on Saturday night. Four of the 120 passengers said they had ear pain as a result.

Flight 861 was on its way from Denver to Dallas when the crew radioed ahead to ask for help to be waiting for the Boeing 737.

From Texas Standard.

This week’s deadly Southwest Airlines incident marked the first passenger death in U.S. commercial aviation since 2009. A mother of two was killed when she was partially pulled from the plane by decompression forces after a window was shattered by shrapnel from an exploding engine.

The Federal Aviation Administration has ordered inspections of fan blades on some jet engines of the same type as the one that blew apart on a Southwest Airlines flight, causing the death of a passenger and injuring seven others.

Meanwhile, Philadelphia's medical examiner says Jennifer Riordan, who died on the Dallas-bound Boeing 737 flight, was killed by blunt trauma to her head, neck and torso when she was partially blown out a cabin window shattered by engine debris. Federal inspectors say Riordan, 43, was wearing a seatbelt at the time of the accident.

NTSB via AP

Federal investigators are looking into what caused engine failure on a Southwest plane bound for Dallas Tuesday. One passenger died, the first in-flight fatality for the airline. 

A passenger who survived the emergency landing says the experience doesn't even feel real yet.

Matty Martinez via AP

Southwest pilot Tammie Jo Shults is being praised for her cool demeanor after her plane suffered a blown engine — killing one passenger — and she was forced to make a one-engine, emergency landing in Philadelphia with nearly 150 people on board Tuesday.

Shutterstock

A preliminary examination of the blown jet engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that set off a terrifying chain of events and left a businesswoman hanging half outside a shattered window showed evidence of "metal fatigue," according to the National Transportation Safety Board.

Southwest Airlines

A Southwest Airlines jet headed for Dallas blew an engine at 32,000 feet and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window, setting off a desperate scramble by passengers to save a woman from getting sucked out. She later died, and seven others were injured.

Updated at 10:35 p.m. ET

One person died after a Southwest Airlines plane experienced serious engine trouble Tuesday and was forced to make an emergency landing in Philadelphia. Seven other people on Flight 1380 were injured. It is the first U.S. airline fatality since 2009.

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Reema Khrais

This week, Southwest Airlines is bringing back a familiar slogan: “Wanna Get Away?”

The last time that tagline was featured in advertisements was nearly a decade ago. The ads typically featured people looking to skip town after humiliating themselves.

“It has broad appeal. Everybody relates to those moments,” said Anne Murray, senior director of marketing communications at Southwest Airlines. 

Murray said the airline’s newest “Wanna Get Away” ad is running in several local markets, including a debut on NBC’s Thursday night National Football League broadcast.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

It’s been a bumpy week for Dallas based southwest Airlines. This week, a computer outage took down its website, forcing 1,300 flight cancellations, and stranding passengers and crews. Then, despite a record second quarter profit, its stock price fell. Today, hundreds of union members picketed at Love Field over stalled contract talks.  

Chris Parypa / Shutterstock

American and Southwest Airlines both got tentative federal government approval today to start commercial flights to Cuba. But there will be no non-stops out of north Texas airports.

American Airlines Group

Fort Worth based American Airlines set an all-time earnings record today for the second quarter; it made nearly $2 billion. That news comes a day after Dallas-based Southwest announced its OWN all-time best.

The early 1970s were a turbulent time for a little startup called Southwest Airlines.

The company had a tiny fleet of just four airplanes that flew to three destinations — all of which were in Texas. But by 1972, Southwest had already posted a net loss of $1.6 million, and the company was forced to sell one of its planes.

"They were not yet a year old. They were consistently losing money. They were constantly scrambling to see what they could do to save cost or boost revenues," says Terry Maxon, the aviation reporter at The Dallas Morning News.

Southwest Airlines

Southwest is spending about a buck less on every gallon of fuel, and that's helping the airline post record profits quarter after quarter.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

It’s Fare-war time again at Love Field. Virgin America announced it’ll fly from Dallas to Austin for $39. That got the attention of Dallas-based Southwest, which built its business, in part, on that route.

Dallas Love Field / Facebook

The Love Field airline wars hit a new level today as Virgin America announced it would challenge Southwest on one of the routes that built the low-cost carrier -- Dallas to Austin.

BJ Austin / KERA News

Air traffic took off in November at Dallas Love Field thanks in part to the end of the Wright Amendment in October. But there’s more to it.

Kovalchynskyy Mykola / Shutterstock

Five stories that have North Texas talking: a couple from Nashville choose an unusual venue for their wedding, the outcome of the Denton fracking ban vote may not be the end of legal debate, the Dallas Zoo sells off naming rights for a newborn giraffe, and more.

BJ Austin / KERA News

At Dallas Love Field, starting Monday, you are now free to move about the country nonstop on Southwest Airlines and Virgin America. The Wright Amendment flight restrictions are expiring. 

Southwest Airlines

Southwest Airlines will put a new paint job on its planes, adding a splash of bright color as it enters middle age and faces many changes. It's also adding a social media "Listening Center."

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Flight running late? Searching for baggage? Forget standing in line. Send a tweet or Facebook message. A growing number of airlines are hiring social media first responders to help with customer relations, and Southwest Airlines has just joined the club. They now have nine “social care” representatives working seven days a week, eighteen hours a day.

The Federal Aviation Administration announced Monday that it intends to fine Southwest Airlines $12 million for flying Boeing 737 airplanes without making proper repairs.

Beginning in 2006, Southwest began "extreme makeover" alterations to address cracking of aluminum skin on 44 jetliners, the FAA said in a news release.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Much virtual ink has been spilled and hot air spewed over this week’s decision to let Virgin America move its operations from D/FW International Airport to Dallas Love Field. Rick Seaney of FareCompare.com explains what this and other changes could mean for flyers.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Dallas city officials announced Monday afternoon that Virgin America will get the two open gates at Dallas Love Field. Virgin beat out Dallas-based Southwest Airlines for the gates, which American Airlines had to give up due to its merger with U.S. Airways.

WFAA/YouTube

In today's All Things Considered local block from the KERA Newsroom: A run-off debate between Republican state senator Dan Patrick and Lieutenant Governor David Dewhurst at WFAA-TV became heated today. Shelley Kofler has the story. Bill Zeeble reports on two airlines – Virgin America and Southwest Airlines – vying for the two open gates at Love Field. And a story so good, we had to air it twice: the start of KERA’s “Broken Hips” series. Lauren Silverman will be reporting on this health issue for the next two months. 

Leena Robinson / shutterstock.com/gallery-935740p1.html

This is no joke: Fort Worth is the least funny big city in the country.

Yes, scholars have researched the topic and have even produced a book showcasing their work: The Humor Code: A Global Search for What Makes Things Funny by Peter McGraw and Joel Warner.

They surveyed the 50 biggest cities in the country. They say they discovered that humor has a “local flavor” – what’s funny in Dallas might not be as hilarious in Chicago.

Fort Worth isn't too funny for words. Cowtown ranked dead last on a list that ranks the funniness of the 50 cities. Arlington, you’re a bit funnier, but not by much. Arlington placed No. 46 on the list.

Stephen M. Keller / Southwest Airlines

Southwest Airlines announced this morning it will start nonstop flights between Dallas Love Field and New York, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles and 12 other cities this fall, once the Wright Amendment comes to an end.

The amendment has long limited Southwest to offer nonstop service from Love Field to nine states, including Texas. Those restrictions go away in October.

Dallas-based Southwest will serve five of the new nonstop destinations starting Oct. 13 – Baltimore/Washington; Denver; Las Vegas; Orlando and Chicago Midway.

YouCaring.com

Five stories that have North Texas talking: the suspicious death of a girl about to turn 3, the Southwest Airlines jet that landed at the wrong airport in Missouri, the political debate raging around a pregnant Haltom City woman who's on life support and more.

Southwest Airlines

Let the (one-year) countdown begin.

On Monday, Southwest Airlines set up a clock at Love Field that counts down to the start of nonstop cross-country flights out of the Dallas airport. Oct. 13, 2014, will mark the end of the Wright Amendment, which restricts the Dallas-based airline from flying nonstop to most of the country.

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