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A recent study found 70 percent of Americans binge-watch TV shows, sitting through an average of five episodes per marathon session. But that trend raises some health concerns.

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With school back in session, students are having to readjust from their summer sleeping habits. 

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Even though people sleep less as they age, it doesn’t mean they need less sleep. A geriatrics specialist talks about factors that can impair sleep for seniors and steps they can take to get some needed rest.

Why Deliberate Rest Is The Key To Success

Dec 8, 2016
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For many Americans finding time to rest is often the last priority of a busy workday. On Think, Krys Boyd talked with Alex Pang, founder of The Restful Company, about why deliberate rest is the key to more productivity and success. 

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KERA examines common health issues in our series Vital Signs.

In this edition, a problem common to many – weight gain. A possible solution may lie in how much you sleep. 

Dr. Ryan Hays, Director of Sleep Medicine at Parkland Hospital System and Assistant Professor of Neurology & Neurotherapeutics at UT Southwestern Medical Center, explains how one affects the other.

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On your way into work this morning, there’s a good chance you were still sleepy. The good news is, you can fix that if you can find as little as 15 minutes. Tuesday on Think, sleep expert Dr. James Maas talked to Krys Boyd about the benefits of the power nap.

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The American Academy of Pediatrics now recommends that middle schools and high schools start no earlier than 8:30 a.m. Seniors at Dubiski Career High School in Grand Prairie, participants of the KERA Yearbook Project, had a lot to say about how hard it is to get enough sleep as a teenager.

We spend about one-third of our lives sleeping, but much of that function remains a mystery. Weekend Edition Sunday is asking some pretty fundamental, yet complicated, questions about why we do it and why we can't seem to get more of it.

Dr. Matthew Walker says the question of why we sleep remains "that archetypal mystery."

Walker, the principal investigator at the sleep lab the University of California, Berkeley, works with patients who suffer from sleep abnormalities. He says the complexity of sleep makes the research that much more fascinating.

Mutations on a single gene appear to increase the risk for both an unusual sleep disorder and migraines, a team reports in Science Translational Medicine.

The finding could help explain the links between sleep problems and migraines. It also should make it easier to find new drugs to treat migraines, researchers say.

And for one member of the research team, Emily Bates, the discovery represents a personal victory.

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If you’re having trouble falling asleep at night, blue light from various sources – including electronic devices -- might be a problem. Studies suggest even low levels of blue light can delay secretions in the body of melatonin, a hormone that helps regulate sleep and wake cycles. In this edition of Vital Signs, the scoop on blue light from sleep specialist Dr. John Herman, a professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at UT Southwestern Medical Center.