Science

Science
10:54 am
Fri August 29, 2014

SMU Football Players Will Hit The Field With Kevlar-Lined Helmets

The green liner in this helmet created by Unequal Technologies features military-grade Kevlar.
Lauren Silverman KERA News

The football players at SMU will be wearing something new under their helmet this season. At the first game of the season, SMU’s Mustangs will all be wearing helmets outfitted with ballistics-grade kevlar.

Read more
Science
1:35 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Study Up For 'Think': What We See When We Read

A collection of Peter Mendelsund's designs featured in the Book Culture bookstore in New York.
Nathaniel Bellows / Twitter

How do the words we read on a page translate into the images we see in our head? Peter Mendelsund, Associate Art Director for Alfred A. Knopf Books, joins Krys Boyd on Think today. At 1 p.m., he’ll discuss the neuroscience behind reading, which he covers in his book What We See When We Read.

Read more
Science
12:17 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Study Up For 'Think': A Look At The Rover On The Red Planet

This summer marks the second year since the Curiosity Rover's landing on Mars.
intelfreepress / Flickr

Two summers ago, the Mars Curiosity rover made its landing on the red planet. Approximately thirty-five million miles from Earth, the $2.5 billion robot has had faced its ups and downs. At noon, Marc Kaufman, author of Mars Up Close: Inside the Curiosity Mission, talks with Krys Boyd on Think about the rover’s journey so far.

Read more
Science
6:03 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Can't Stand Meetings? Try Taking Away The Chairs

Standing even for part of a meeting could engage your team in more productive collaboration, researchers say.
pixdeluxe/Getty Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 10:49 am

The secret to more productive meetings? You might simply need to stand up.

This we know, to some degree. Just take as examples the growing popularity of standing desks, which took off after a flurry of reports found that sitting for long periods of time can significantly, negatively, impact employees' health.

Read more
Science
9:59 am
Wed June 11, 2014

Study Up For 'Think': A Look At Laughter

We know that something funny lends to laughter. But what initially makes something funny?
puck90 flickr

To guffaw, to chuckle, to giggle—laughter, regardless of how we do it, is a form of expression everyone experiences. But why do we do it? Today at 1 p.m. on Think, we will speak to Peter McGraw about his quest for the answer in "The Humor Code: A Global Search for What Makes Things Funny."

Read more
Science
8:55 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Neil deGrasse Tyson: When It Comes To Asteroids, Be Afraid. Be (A Tiny Bit) Afraid.

That vest is the actual vest Tyson wears in the Superman comic.
Credit Shutterstock

In 2013, a meteor exploded over the Ural Mountains in Russia (you might remember the dashcam footage and the seemingly non-plussed Russians who captured it).

Which begs the question: What else flying around in the cosmos might come into contact with Earth? And who better to deliver the answer than Neil deGrasse Tyson?

Read more
Environment
11:14 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Study Up For 'Think:' Understanding The Ins And Outs Of Fracking

Growing concerns about the effects of fracking have many North Texans protesting the industry. Russell Gold addresses the pros and cons of the process in his new book: The Boom.
Clinton McBride socialistworker.org

North Texas is a battleground for pro and anti-fracking camps -- especially Denton, where residents have signed a petition to ban fracking in the city. Russell Gold, author of The Boom: How Fracking Ignited the American Energy Revolution and Changed the World, will speak with KERA's Krys Boyd today at noon on "Think" to talk about the process and future of fracking.

Read more
Science
6:36 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

EPA To Release Air Pollution Guidelines, North Texas Groups Weigh In

A coal-fired power plant in West Virginia
Wigwam Jones Flickr

The Dallas County Medical Society is backing a group rallying for strict EPA air pollution guidelines.

A hearing was held in Dallas Thursday as the EPA prepares to release its first-ever set of guidelines to reduce carbon pollution from power plants.

Read more
Friday Conversation
9:13 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Inside The Dallas-Trained Brain That Won A Nobel

Dr. Thomas Südhof, who won a Nobel prize this week, spent 25 years at UT Southwestern in Dallas.
Steve Fisch Stanford

This week’s Nobel Prizes had a distinct twang. Three North Texas universities had small roles in the project that won the physics medal – and the winner of the Nobel for Medicine spent 25 years at UT Southwestern in Dallas. Dr. Thomas Südhof took a break in his whirlwind week for our Friday Conversation.

Read more
9:57 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Talk About A Brainiac! After 25 Years At UT Southwestern, Researcher Wins Nobel

Lead in text: 
Dr. Thomas C. Südhof moved to Stanford in 2008 after a quarter-century in Dallas.
We're deep into Nobel Prize season, and a brain researcher with North Texas roots is celebrating. Dr. Thomas C. Südhof is one of three scientists who shared the Nobel for Physiology or Medicine on Monday. The Stanford professor did his prize-winning research - on "synaptic transmission," or how brain cells communicate with chemical signals - during his 25 years at UT Southwestern in Dallas.

Pages