Science | KERA News

Science

Science news

Conservationists want you to eat more lionfish. Wait, what?

6 hours ago
3
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/trik/3945251175/">Tiziano Luccarelli</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>

With its arsenal of spiny, venom-tipped fin rays, the lionfish is not a typical (or easy) ingredient in your fish tacos. But at Norman’s Cay, a restaurant in downtown Manhattan, lionfish comes grilled or fried — and its mild white meat is starting to show up in other restaurants in Florida and New York.

2
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/peretzpup/2486757322/">Eugene Peretz</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. Image rotated, cropped.

If there’s one word that can sum up our feelings about this year’s presidential election — the most polarizing and bitterly fought in recent memory — it might just be “stressful.”

In October, a survey by the American Psychological Association found that the election was a significant source of stress for more than half of all Americans. And now that Election Day has passed, we’re probably still reeling — whether from a hard-fought battle or our candidate’s loss at the polls.

Scientists just used Hawaii as a 'body double' for Mars

Nov 28, 2016
7
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/daveynin/7189311678/">daveynin</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>. Image cropped.

This fall, there's been plenty of buzz about sending humans to Mars. Elon Musk recently unveiled designs for a two-stage Mars vehicle and NASA has its own transport system in the works, slated for launch by the 2030s.

But how will scientists (and the rest of us) get to the Red Planet, and how will science actually happen once we're there?

p
Erik De Castro/Reuters

It’s been more than 50 years since the Food and Drug Administration first approved birth control pills for women. Since then, other reversible contraceptives like implants, injections and intrauterine devices (IUDs) have also entered the market — but still, just for women.

For men, condoms have remained the only completely reversible birth control option, and they have a 12 percent failure rate with typical use.

If you own a car, chances are it’s parked much of the time, whether at the office or in your driveway. Sure, not a great overall use of the vehicle. But would you be comfortable with another option — renting it out, perhaps even to a stranger?

In science, a picture is worth a thousand data points. And recently, our glimpses at two very different worlds got much, much clearer.

Pages