Race | KERA News

Race

KERA is covering the impact of race on a rapidly diversifying region – in education, poverty, the arts, the criminal justice system, health care, voting rights and other areas. We're also exploring the intersections between race, class, gender and identity.

Other coverage of race by KERA:

Here are the latest stories on race from KERA, the Texas Station Collaborative and NPR:

Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT

The State Board of Education will take a final vote Friday on what will be the first state-approved course on Mexican-American history in Texas public schools.

KERA News

Former NFL player Husain Abdullah will be among the students at Southern Methodist University walking the stage this weekend. His journey to a master's degree in conflict resolution is like no other.

Allison V. Smith / KERA News special contributor

A new study by the Communities Foundation of Texas and the left-leaning Center For Public Policy Priorities evaluated education, employment, debt, housing and healthcare across Dallas County. 

The data show experiences vary greatly from zip code to zip code.

City of Plano; Facebook

Plano voters will have the chance to vote this November on whether a controversial elected official should keep his seat.

When Martin Luther King, Jr. flew from Atlanta to Memphis on the morning of April 3, 1968, he was not in a particularly good state of mind.

"While the plane was about to take off, there was a bomb threat that was specifically targeted at King and that delayed the departure of the flight," says Joseph Rosenbloom, author of the new book Redemption: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Last 31 Hours. "They brought dogs onto the plane, they evacuated the passengers. And so the plane arrived an hour or so late in Memphis."

The Library of Congress

The top local stories this morning from KERA News: Events across the country will honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The civil rights activist was assassinated 50 years ago, Wednesday.

Gun rights groups, including the NRA, have seen a rise in membership since the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., in February. But one group in particular has had a major increase well before that. The National African American Gun Association's numbers tripled after the inauguration of President Trump.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

A small group of Dallas faith leaders gathered beneath the Confederate war memorial in Pioneer Park Friday, demanding the city proceed with its original recommendation to remove the public monument.

Jessica Diaz-Hurtado / KERA News special contributor

Cuban-born entrepreneur and philanthropist Jorge Baldor is behind some well-known cultural and political efforts in the Dallas Latino community.

In the days after the Austin bombings, Jesus Valles couldn’t stop thoughts from buzzing around like bees in his head. He made sense of his feelings the best way he knew how: He sat down at his computer and began to write a public Facebook post about Austin.

“Austin is an exhausting place where racism smiles at you and does yoga and is a kind teacher and is such a good actor and is just trying to help you and just wants to know why you’re so upset,” Valles wrote.

Updated at 2:00 a.m. ET Tuesday

Linda Brown, who as a schoolgirl was at the center of the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case that rejected racial segregation in American schools, died in Topeka, Kan., Sunday afternoon. She was 76.

Her sister, Cheryl Brown Henderson, confirmed the death to The Topeka Capital-Journal.

Capital Factory

Starting a successful business requires a great idea, paying customers and access to capital if you want it to grow. The business world is tough, but even tougher for people of color and women. Historically, they have a harder time securing business loans and investor funding needed to take their startup to the next level.

A new study conducted by researchers at Stanford, Harvard and the Census Bureau, finds that in 99 percent of neighborhoods in the United States, black boys earn less in adulthood than white boys who come from similar socioeconomic backgrounds. This undermines the widely-held belief that class, not race, is the most fundamental predictor of economic outcomes for children in the U.S.

Sherry Alvarez says she knew there was something different about her son since he was about 9 months old. Back then Sherry says his pediatrician told her there was nothing to worry about, " 'Boys are a little slower than girls, so let's just wait until his second birthday.' " We aren't using Sherry's son's name to protect his privacy.

By her son's second birthday, Sherry says she was getting desperate. She didn't know why he wasn't talking yet or showing affection like other kids. At 2 1/2, he was referred to Children's Hospital Los Angeles.

Russell Lee, Library of Congress / Wikimedia Commons

Along with the risks of poverty and unemployment during the Great Depression, Mexican immigrants and even U.S. citizens of Mexican descent faced an additional hazard: Around half a million of them were kicked out of the country to preserve jobs for white Americans.  

If you didn’t know this, it could be because it wasn’t covered the same way by every news outlet.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

A man dressed in gold and black blows a trumpet shell. A teenage boy beats on a drum. They’re part of a group that performs traditional Aztec dances.

On Saturday morning, they’re inside the gym at the Wesley-Rankin Community Center in West Dallas. Some of the kids watching may have seen these colorfully dressed dancers before, but few of them know what the dances mean.

Shutterstock

America has a habit of following trends that occur in one of its states: Texas.

People of color make nearly 40 percent of the U.S. population, and women make up more than half. But you couldn't guess that by looking at American journalists, according to a new report by the Women's Media Center.

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

A Plano City Council member generated headlines – and controversy – a couple of weeks ago when he posted a video on his Facebook page, calling for a ban on Islam in schools. Tom Harrison later apologized.

Despite calls to resign, Harrison says he’s not stepping down. Many in Plano say the council member’s actions were a blow to the city’s Muslim community.

For immigrants, this past week has been a doozy: First, the United States Citizen and Immigration Services took the words "nation of immigrants" out of its mission statement. Then, the Supreme Court ruled that immigrants held in detention are not entitled to bail hearings.

Courtesy of UNT Health Science Center

Advancements in medicine have helped improve the overall health of Americans over the past several decades, but they haven’t benefited everyone.

Callie Richmond for The Texas Tribune

It's indisputable that Texas has a depressing voter turnout history.

Year after year, the state ranks near the bottom in electoral participation, with turnout dipping even lower during non-presidential elections.

Part 3 of a three-part series.

As Texas looks to reduce its maternal mortality rate, there is one aspect of the crisis that is going to be harder to solve: Black women are more likely to die while pregnant or after giving birth than women from other racial or ethnic groups.

Courtney Collins / KERA news

Until last month, West Dallas had just one brick-and-mortar bank out on the fringe of the neighborhood, near the interstate.

A new bank branch wants to build a relationship with the heart of the community: low- and middle-income families who've lived there for decades.

Shutterstock

In the era of U.S. slavery, it was illegal for African-Americans in many parts of the country — both enslaved and free — to learn to read and write.

But millions who were denied that right understood the power of education. By the late 19th century, there were dozens of black colleges in the United States.

City of Plano; Facebook

Plano City Council member Tom Harrison says he will not resign even though his colleagues have censured him. 

City of Plano; Facebook

Plano City Council has called a special meeting for noon Sunday to discuss the future of a council member who came under fire this week for his anti-Islam post on Facebook.

City of Plano; Facebook

A Plano City Council member has apologized for sharing a video on Facebook that he says "wrongfully implied I am anti-Muslim."

From Texas Standard.

Candidates all over the Lone Star State are pouring their hearts, souls and resources into their campaigns. The primaries in Texas are only three weeks away.

While resources are a major challenge for every candidate, that’s particularly true for those with little name recognition. Some organizations like Emily’s List and Annie’s List are making money available to the record number of female candidates running this year. but the money is not available to everyone.

GABRIEL CRISToVER PeREZ / KUT

In Texas, mothers are dying — and lawmakers and public health officials are trying to figure out why.

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