Parkinson's | KERA News

Parkinson's

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

At the UNT Health Science Center in Fort Worth, researchers are doing something unusual: They’re making people fall down. It’s all happening at the Human Movement Performance Lab, where they’re mapping how people with Parkinson’s disease and other mobility issues react to jolts and falls.

Shutterstock

We examine real-life health issues in our series, Vital Signs. In this episode, dementia.

Actor and comedian Robin Williams was being treated for Parkinson’s Disease when he committed suicide in 2014, but the autopsy showed signs of Lewy Body Dementia.

Dr. Angela Bentle, a geriatrics specialist at Methodist Charlton Medical Center, talked about the often misdiagnosed disorder.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Hundreds of people with Parkinson’s have brought their voices back to life through a unique program in North Texas.

Shutterstock

People with Parkinson’s Disease struggle with movements that used to be automatic. That includes walking, blinking and speaking. Today on Think, a speech-language pathologist talked to Krys Boyd about a North Texas program that’s helping Parkinson’s patients regain the ability to speak.

Samatha Elandary says problems for Parkinson’s patients start with a shortage of dopamine in the brain.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

For someone who has Parkinson’s disease, movement can be the greatest challenge. That’s why doctors are urging Parkinson’s patients to hit the dance floor.

Huntington's Disease is a hereditary, degenerative brain disorder that affects about 30,000 people in the U.S. Currently, there is no known cure for the disease. A new grant from the National Institutes of Health will provide $1.67 million over five years for research on the disorder at UT Dallas.