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Rick Holter/KERA News

Union Station in downtown Dallas opened in 1916 as a railroad hub for the city. At its peak, 80 trains passed through daily.  After a brief closure in the 1970s, Union Station still services buses and rail, but it remains underused. However, things are looking up as the station approaches its 100th birthday.

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Women  experience menopause around  51 years old, on average. But combing through 32 studies involving 310, 000 women, researchers in the Netherlands concluded menopause before the age of 45 may increase risk for cardiovascular disease and death. 

On her first day back at work after giving birth, Tricia Olson drank copious amounts of coffee, stuffed tissues in her pocket, and tried not to cry. After all, her son Gus was just 3 weeks old.

Olson, 32, works for a small towing company and U-Haul franchise in Rock Springs, Wyo., and she could not afford to be away from work any longer.

"The house bill's not going to pay itself," she says, her voice breaking in an audio diary she kept as part of a series on the challenges facing working parents airing on NPR's All Things Considered.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

The Dallas school district launched a program last year designed to turn around its most troubled schools. It’s called ACE – accelerated campus excellence. Last year, six of the seven ACE schools got off the state’s improvement required list. 

The video is disturbing and prompts many questions — and that's how the police see it. The family of Terence Crutcher, who was shot dead by police Friday, says the footage should lead to criminal charges against the officer who killed an unarmed man.

The Justice Department has begun a parallel investigation into possible civil rights charges related to Crutcher's death, U.S. Attorney Danny Williams Sr. said Monday. He promised "to seek justice on behalf of this family, and for the public."

Texas Found 276 Cases of Groundwater Contamination Last Year

Sep 8, 2016
Steve A. Johnson / The Texas Tribune

State regulators last year documented 276 new cases of groundwater contamination across Texas, a slight increase compared to 2014 but far fewer than in years past.

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A new UT Southwestern Medical Center study of electronic medical records from six Dallas-Fort Worth area hospitals found 20 percent of patients had one or more unstable vital signs when they were released within 24 hours of discharge. Doing so can lead to serious consequences. 

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2016 marked five years since the death of a special volunteer in Richardson schools. Anne Foster reflects on the example Art Middlebrook left behind about the importance of public schools.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

In this series, The First Week, KERA's reporters are listening in on the conversations about race happening in and around North Texas schools. Today, what students are saying about the violence this summer: police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota, and a gunman's July ambush that killed five law officers in downtown Dallas.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Over the next five days, in a series called "The First Week," we’ll listen in on the conversations students, parents, educators and police officers are having after a summer of racial turmoil in the U.S. and police shootings in Dallas. First, we look at race through the perspective of a black family in Arlington.

Dane Walters / KERA News

By the early 1980s, Vernon Fisher was part of a loose group of artists who broke with abstract painting. He’d been painting abstract works himself in the ’70s but, discouraged, he began playing with books and texts, scraps he found around his studio. One day, he was printing out words with an old Dymo plastic label maker.

If you watch a watermelon harvest you may never think about the pink summery fruit again the same way.

Two pickers walk the rows. They bend over and grab the 20-pound gourds and pitch them to a man perched on the side of a dump truck, who heaves them up to another catcher in the truck bed. The pickers have arms like Popeye and the timing of acrobats. They like this crop because the bigger the melons the more they can earn.

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When you don’t have much money, finding legal representation is a challenge; which is why North Texas legal aid groups want families with limited resources to know, help is out there.

Out on the wide open plains of West Texas, you can see the horizon for 360 degrees, interrupted only by the nodding up and down of pump jacks pulling oil up out of the earth.

There lies the aptly named town of Midland.

To get the hang of the place, you need to start downtown, on a corner near the Chase Bank, where an electric billboard displays the essentials: the temperature, a message — "God Bless Midland" — and a number. On this day, it's 45.94.

Is White Rage Behind America's Racial Divide?

Aug 9, 2016
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Today marks two years since Michael Brown was fatally shot by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. When the Justice Department investigated the city’s police department, it found evidence of racial bias.

The Case For Universal Basic Income

Aug 8, 2016
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Today Donald Trump laid out his economic plan, and later this week Hillary Clinton will do the same. They’ve got different ideas about how to help American workers, yet there’s one idea neither of them has mentioned to date – a universal basic income. Today on Think, Krys Boyd talked about the idea with Andy Stern, a senior fellow at Columbia University. He’s the author of "Raising the Floor: How a Universal Basic Income Can Renew Our Economy and Rebuild the American Dream."

The History Of Zika

Aug 3, 2016
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Media accounts of  Zika, Ebola and SARS sometimes give the impression that they are new viruses, when in fact evidence suggests they’ve  been around for a long time in their natural hosts — animals. Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke to Jonna Mazet, a University of California - Davis epidemiology professor, about the spread of Zika and other infectious diseases. Mazet is featured in the PBS documentary “Spillover: Zika, Ebola and Beyond,” which airs tonight at 9 on KERA TV.

The Path For Clinton

Jul 28, 2016
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Hillary Clinton will accept the nomination for president tonight at the Democratic National Convention. Today on Think, Krys Boyd hosted a two-hour special on Hillary Clinton and the DNC. The episode featured a report from NPR’s Sam Sanders, a look at Clinton's background and a panel of political scientists discussing the convention so far. 

Thoughts On Trails - And How They're Made

Jul 25, 2016
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If you live in North Texas, you’ve probably taken a stroll down the Katy Trail or spent the morning hiking at Cedar Ridge Preserve. Ever wonder, though, how these things got there? Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke with Robert Moor, author of “On Trails: An Exploration,” about the role people play in forming new paths

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A recently-published study shows some weight loss medications actually do help, but they’re not cures. An expert in non-surgical weight loss at UT Southwestern Medical Center says users of the drugs need to be clear about what they’re taking.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

It’s been a bumpy week for Dallas based southwest Airlines. This week, a computer outage took down its website, forcing 1,300 flight cancellations, and stranding passengers and crews. Then, despite a record second quarter profit, its stock price fell. Today, hundreds of union members picketed at Love Field over stalled contract talks.  

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Simply re-arranging food pantry shelves is helping low income families make healthier choices. It's the same philosophy supermarkets employ-- called nudging-- when the store creates a special display to feature a product.

One North Texas pantry has had luck pushing brown rice, and whole wheat pasta.

Four Ways Americans Can Unite In Spite Of Recent Violence

Jul 18, 2016
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Violence across the country this summer — in Orlando, Dallas and Baton Rouge – along with videos of shootings of civilians by police has many Americans on edge. Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke with Washington University associate law professor John Inazu about ways to bridge the current divides within American society. John Inazu is the author of, “Confident Pluralism: Surviving and Thriving Through Deep Difference.”

Carlo Allegri / Reuters

President Obama was in Dallas Tuesday to speak at the interfaith memorial service for the five police officers who were killed in downtown last week.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

The parents of Dallas shooter Micah Johnson say they are surprised by his violent rampage and note he returned from an Army deployment to Afghanistan a changed man.

Black Gun Owners In Texas Decry Racial Bias

Jul 10, 2016
Todd Wiseman/Randall Pugh / Texas Tribune illustration

Mark Hughes, wearing a camouflage shirt and legally, openly carrying an AR-15 rifle, was among dozens of black people in downtown Dallas on Thursday evening who were peacefully protesting against the recent back-to-back officer-involved killings of two black men.

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Five stories that have North Texas talking: A Lake Jackson native ate Chick-fil-A regularly and lost 140 pounds; A Dallas woman won The Price Is Right; TCU researchers hope to save the bats; and more.

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Does geography actually matter when it comes to getting that first job?

A new Wallethub study ranks the best and worst cities for starting a career, and Texas is all over the top 25. Analyst Jill Gonzalez breaks down the rankings with KERA's Courtney Collins.

KERA News

KERA won five awards from the Public Radio News Directors Inc. -- the station's best-ever performance in public radio's premiere national contest. The station also took home four Lone Star Awards from the Houston Press Club.

That brings KERA's award count for this year to 29 -- another record.

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Britain will vote on Thursday whether to stay or leave the European Union. The fallout from that vote could have major implications elsewhere. UT Dallas professor Harold Clarke studies British politics and economics, and he explains what a ‘Brexit’ vote would mean for Texas.

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