North Texas Food Bank | KERA News

North Texas Food Bank

North Texas Food Bank

Trisha Cunningham has been named the new president and CEO of the North Texas Food Bank, six months after the organization’s longtime leader died of cancer.

North Texas Food Bank

Editor's note: Jan Pruitt, president and CEO of the North Texas Food Bank, died Jan. 2 after a battle with cancer. Last month, Pruitt stepped down from her post at the food bank after two decades of service. This story was published on Dec. 27. It details her life and work. 

Holiday Volunteering In North Texas: A Quick Guide

Nov 24, 2016
Christopher Connelly / KERA News

It’s always a good time to give back to the community. And the holiday season is no exception. Whether it’s your money or time, there are plenty of ways to donate to organizations that feed, clothe and help North Texans get back on their feet.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Simply re-arranging food pantry shelves is helping low income families make healthier choices. It's the same philosophy supermarkets employ-- called nudging-- when the store creates a special display to feature a product.

One North Texas pantry has had luck pushing brown rice, and whole wheat pasta.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

After announcing a 10-year plan to jump from 62 million meals a year to 92 million, staffers at the North Texas Food Bank admit, it will be a challenging decade.

Forget 10 years down the road, serving as much as they do now isn’t exactly a cinch. 

Courtney Collins / KERA News

The North Texas Food Bank is tackling hunger with a bold 10-year plan. The goal? To put out 92 million meals a year by 2025. That’s 50 percent more than what’s being served now.

Rick Holter / KERA News

New research out of the North Texas Food Bank's Hunger Center explores the link between food security and other financial habits. According to Research Director Richard Amory, data shows bad financial practices may actually cause food insecurity. 

Courtney Collins / KERA News

North Texas is 91 million meals short. That’s how many breakfasts, lunches and dinners it would take to feed everyone in the region who’s hungry.

The North Texas Food Bank filled about two thirds of that void last year, and the traditional client is changing. In fact, more people with jobs are getting meals from food pantries than anyone else.

BJ Austin / KERA News

Starting Friday, SNAP, or food stamp benefits, will be cut by 5 percent. That’s $36 a month for a family of four. Food bank operators in North Texas are bracing for more people lining up at local pantries.