memory | KERA News

memory

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Researchers in North Texas have identified more than 100 genes linked to memory in the human brain. 

Dr. Genevieve Konopka of UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas talks about her team's research — and how it could help develop new therapies for patients who have epilepsy or memory disorders. 

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A lot of us think rushing from task to task and packing our schedules is a necessary evil. It turns out being busy might be good for your brain. That’s the conclusion of a new study led by North Texas researchers in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.

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Millions of Americans suffer from memory loss - it could be from Alzheimer’s disease, a traumatic brain injury from the battlefield – or even a car wreck. UT Southwestern Medical Center is working with several universities on an ambitious project to stop memory loss

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Trying to remember a grocery list or a phone conversation isn’t always easy. And it turns out, there are certain thoughts that may make these types of tasks even harder.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Kaitlynn Curtner suffered massive bleeding in her brain when she was 12. Doctors say it was caused by an arteriovenous malformation, or AVM. The Tarrant County girl survived, but the condition affected her short-term memory.

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If you’re constantly misplacing your keys and forgetting items on your grocery list, you probably just chalk it up to a bad memory. There are, however, steps you can take to improve your ability to retain information. On Tuesday on KERA's Think, Krys Boyd talked to a neuroscientist to get a few tips.