Latinos | KERA News

Latinos

About a third of Latinos in America say they've been personally discriminated against when it comes to applying for jobs, being paid equally or considered for promotions — and when trying to rent a room or apartment or buy a house. Slightly more (37 percent) say they've personally experienced racial or ethnic slurs because of their race or ethnicity.

Latinos say institutional discrimination, including discrimination while trying to vote or participate in politics, is a problem in America today. However, when asked, many Latinos reported feeling better about their local government.

That's according to a new survey out this week from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Bob Daemmrich for the Texas Tribune

SAN ANTONIO — Greg Abbott may not have a serious opponent for re-election yet, but he is already running against one group in particular: those who say Texas’ Republican governor can’t make further inroads with the Hispanic community in the era of Texas' "sanctuary cities" ban and Donald Trump.

Courtesy of Mi Habana

Depending on who you ask, there are many ways to cure a cold. Some people turn to brand-name cough syrup and others, to herbal teas.

In Texas, there’s a long tradition of combining both modern and alternative medicine — a tradition that patients rarely discuss with their doctors.

In the 1970s, the nation's Latino advocacy groups had grown fed up with the U.S. Census Bureau. During its 1970 population count, the agency had made a half-hearted attempt to quantify the number of Latinos and Hispanics living in the United States.

One of President Trump's boldest, most ambitious proposals on the campaign trail was to build a wall along the Southern border and get Mexico to pay for it. Amid the tumult of Trump's first few months in office, the border wall hasn't gotten as much attention as some other things. But new legislation has been introduced in Congress to help fund it.

It's called the Border Wall Funding Act of 2017, introduced on March 30 by Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Ala.

There were two major assumptions about Latino voters throughout the presidential campaign:

(1) a record number of Latinos would show up on Election Day to oppose Donald Trump's candidacy and

(2) the anti-immigration rhetoric that launched Trump's campaign would push conservative-leaning Hispanics to flee the Republican Party.

Neither of those assumptions entirely panned out as expected.

Prediction 1: The Surge?

Despite the results of this year’s election, there are still Republicans who say the party needs to appeal to a more diverse group of voters if they want to win the White House in the future. Specifically, they say the party needs to attract Hispanic voters.

And the case study some Republicans are pointing to when they make this argument is solidly-red Texas.

A project underway at Texas Christian University is recording the voices and stories of those who've lived through the Civil Rights Movement in Texas.

Max Krochmal is the director of the project, "Civil Rights in Black and Brown."

There's been lots of chatter on social media and among pundits, warning that the treatment of immigrant kids and English language learners is going to "get worse" under a Donald Trump presidency.

Some people on Twitter are even monitoring incidents in which Latino students in particular have been targeted.

But I wonder: When were these students not targeted? When did immigrant students and their families ever have it easy?

Claudia Sandoval Campaign / Facebook

More than 10 million Hispanics live in Texas – but in many parts of the state, elected officials don’t reflect that diversity.

 

Christopher Connelly/KERA News

The United Hispanic Council of Tarrant County asked the U.S. Justice Department this week to investigate complaints of voter suppression among elderly Latino voters. The group alleges state investigators looking into mail-in voter fraud in the county are actually “creating an atmosphere of fear.”

Gus Contreras / KERA News

In a presidential election where a border wall and immigration are front and center – people are watching the Latino vote. This year, there are a record 27 million Hispanics eligible to vote, and almost half of them are millennials.  

Krystina Martinez / KERA News

Marcelo Cavazos, the man who leads Arlington’s schools system, was named Texas Superintendent of the Year this afternoon. The honor came at the annual Texas Association of School Boards conference in Houston – and it includes a $5,000 prize. The five finalists also included another North Texan, DeSoto superintendent David Harris.

Houston Public Media

As of this fall, the eight largest cities in Texas have Latino superintendents leading the school districts. The latest to join the list: Richard Carranza in Houston. He impressed the Houston Independent School District with his credentials — and his voice.

Gus Contreras / KERA News

Latino millennials could play a bigger role than ever before in this fall’s presidential election.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

With a new school superintendent taking over this fall in Houston, every one of Texas’ eight largest cities now has a Latino running the school district. That’s a big deal in a state with a surging Hispanic population and a history of political underrepresentation. In the first chapter of a statewide collaborative series, KERA digs into the implications for students, schools and the politics of education.

Young Texans Make Up Most Diverse Generation

Jun 23, 2016
Scott Cresswell / The Texas Tribune

If demographics are destiny, the youngest Texans appear destined to make the state dramatically more diverse.

"I mean no disrespect, but I am American of Mexican descent," I heard her say.

I was having breakfast alone but I was absolutely drawn to the conversation going at the table next to me. Donald Trump's comments about a Latino federal judge have sparked discussion about racism and bias.

Texas Tribune

As we near primaries to narrow down choices for president, the Pew Research Center and the National Conference of State Legislatures has released a study of who has been elected to statehouses. 

Texas Troopers Ticketing Fewer Overall, But More Hispanics

Sep 7, 2015
Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

The share of Hispanics receiving traffic citations from state police has doubled in the last five years, even as the total number of tickets written and total number issued to whites have dropped significantly, according to Texas Department of Public Safety data on non-commercial drivers.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Seventy percent of the students in the Dallas Independent School District are Latino. That’s by the far the largest ethnic group. But some parents say they’d like a better relationship with the district. Earlier this week, Superintendent Mike Miles visited a predominately Latino neighborhood in Oak Cliff to talk to some of those parents and their kids.

Michael Ahler, Flickr Creative Commons

While family farms are quickly disappearing in Texas, small-scale agriculture is still alive and well in some immigrant communities in North Texas.

Dianna Douglas

Administrators at Guyer High School in Denton County got tired of seeing immigrant kids miss out on college. The school started a new mentoring program with the University of North Texas to bring college students to campus in the hopes that college will seem a little less far away. 

Mariachi music has a long history, dating back to 18th century Mexico. How do you get the younger generation interested in this old tradition of guitar strumming, violin playing and passionate singing? We checked out a mariachi summer camp for middle and high school kids at the University of North Texas at Denton.

Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

Texas Republicans have abandoned a guest-worker program and taken a harder position on illegal immigration in their party platform.

The platform adopted Saturday also borrows from some positions State Sen. Dan Patrick, the Republican lieutenant governor nominee, has listed on his website.

A new documentary airing next week on KERA-TV takes an in-depth look at the challenges facing Latino students, their families and educators. Bernardo Ruiz, executive producer of The Graduates/Los Graduados will be speaking with “Think” host Krys Boyd during the 1 p.m. hour of the show today. You can tune in on 90.1 FM or listen online.

To coincide with Hispanic Heritage month, PBS TV stations nationwide begin an historic six-hour documentary series tonight, titled “Latino Americans.”   

Covering 500 years of history in six hours, it is the first major documentary series on the history and experience of Latinos in  America.

Watch Latino Americans on KLRU (18.1) Tuesday, Sept. 24 at 7 pm and Tuesday, Oct. 1 at 7 pm.  KLRU's VME channel (18.4) will show the series in Spanish starting Friday, Sept. 20 at 8 pm.  Or watch online at klru.org.

Dallas Mexican American Heritage League

Forty years ago, a 12-year-old boy named Santos Rodriguez was killed by a police officer in Dallas. The event sparked the closest thing to a race riot in the city’s history. 

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

In the West Dallas branch of the city’s public library system, students are learning English. That's no surprise -- especially for a neighborhood with many Latino immigrants.

What's different here, though, is that both parents and kids are in class -- right across the hallway. The dual effort is part of the new Atmos Energy Literacy Center, which opened in January as a partnership with Texas A&M University Commerce. 


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