The Latino Superintendents | KERA News

The Latino Superintendents

When Houston chose a new school superintendent who moonlights as a mariachi, KERA’s education reporter Stella M. Chávez uncovered a previously unreported fact: Latino superintendents were now leading school systems in the state’s eight largest cities. That’s a big deal in a state with a surging Hispanic population and a history of political underrepresentation.

That face sparked a three-part statewide collaborative series -- a deep dive into the demographic numbers, a profile of Houston's new superintendent and a conversation with Arlington's leader, who would be named Texas Superintendent of the Year.

The series aired on KERA in North Texas and KUHF in Houston, and it was heard on public radio stations across the state through the radio newsmagazine Texas Standard. An infographic-rich digital project appeared on the show’s and the stations’ websites and social streams.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Dallas Independent School District Superintendent Michael Hinojosa is the 2017 Latino Superintendent of the Year, according to the Association of Latino Administrators and Superintendents (ALAS).

Krystina Martinez / KERA News

Marcelo Cavazos, the man who leads Arlington’s schools system, was named Texas Superintendent of the Year this afternoon. The honor came at the annual Texas Association of School Boards conference in Houston – and it includes a $5,000 prize. The five finalists also included another North Texan, DeSoto superintendent David Harris.

Houston Public Media

As of this fall, the eight largest cities in Texas have Latino superintendents leading the school districts. The latest to join the list: Richard Carranza in Houston. He impressed the Houston Independent School District with his credentials — and his voice.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

With a new school superintendent taking over this fall in Houston, every one of Texas’ eight largest cities now has a Latino running the school district. That’s a big deal in a state with a surging Hispanic population and a history of political underrepresentation. In the first chapter of a statewide collaborative series, KERA digs into the implications for students, schools and the politics of education.