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The U.S. has dropped the most powerful conventional weapon ever used in combat to hit an underground ISIS complex in Afghanistan, Pentagon officials say.

The nearly 22,000-pound "MOAB" — standing for Massive Ordnance Air Blast, or as it's also known, the "Mother of All Bombs" — was designed during the Iraq War but had never before been used on the battlefield.

The U.S. has used the bomb's predecessor, a smaller but still massive weapon known as the "Daisy Cutter," in Afghanistan before.

Dozens are dead in Baghdad after bombs were detonated across the city on Monday. ISIS has claimed responsibility for the bombings.

The death toll from the attacks is still climbing.

NPR's Alice Fordham reported on the bombings, telling our Newscast Unit:

What European Officials Are Doing To Fight Terrorism

Oct 19, 2016
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Since "Charlie Hebdo," France, Belgium and other European countries continue to be major targets for ISIS. Earlier this week on Think, Krys Boyd talked with Sebastian Rotella, a reporter for Pro-Publica, about what top security officials in the region are doing to prevent future attacks

Lawrence Wright On The Rise Of Terror

Oct 4, 2016
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Pulitzer Prize-winner Lawrence Wright has investigated the evolution of al-Qaeda and ISIS, as well as the changing U.S. response to terrorist groups. On Think, Krys Boyd talked with The New Yorker staff writer about his new book “The Terror Years: From al-Qaeda to the Islamic State.” 

How America Fell In Love With Guns

Jun 13, 2016
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As the county reels from Sunday morning’s events in Orlando, America’s complicated relationship with guns is once again a public conversation. Earlier this month on Think, Krys Boyd explored the topic with Pamela Haag, author of, “The Gunning of America: Business and the Making of American Gun Culture.”

Editor's note, June 16: An earlier version of this story said Omar Mateen carried an AR-15, based on comments from Orlando Police Chief John Mina, who said Sunday that the gun was an "AR-15-assault-type rifle." Law enforcement officials subsequently told NPR that the gun was a Sig Sauer MCX, a rifle similar to an AR-15 but also different in fundamental ways. This story reflects the change.

In the wake of the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history, Hillary Clinton told NPR that in order to counter "self-radicalization," she wanted to create a team "exclusively dedicated to detecting and preventing lone wolf attacks" and possibly even expand terrorist watch lists.

She also called for creating more "integrated intelligence use" among local, state and national law enforcement; "strengthening communication" with other countries; and working with Silicon Valley to "prevent online radicalization."

A gunman opened fire on a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla., early Sunday morning, killing at least 50 people in the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history before being shot dead by police.

At first, they say, it seemed like just part of the music.

It was a Saturday night and the dance tracks had been pounding at the Pulse Orlando nightclub, which calls itself the city's hottest gay bar. A sharp, staccato sound, arriving shortly after 2 a.m. ET, didn't seem out of place.

"I thought it was a Ying Yang Twins song or something," club-goer Christopher Hansen told reporters. "It went with the beat almost."

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

As a shaken Orlando tries to come to grips with the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, here are five ways KERA has explored the gun issue on radio and television in recent months.

In what has become an all-too-familiar ritual in the United States, President Obama said the mass shooting in Orlando on Sunday morning was an "act of terror and an act of hate."

"This is a sobering reminder that attacks on any American ... is an attack on all of us," Obama said during remarks from the White House briefing room. "No act of hate or terror will ever change who we are as Americans."

Obama also said that this shooting is a reminder of "how easy it to let people get their hands on a weapon" that will let them open fire on a place like a school.

The attack in San Bernardino that left 16 people dead, including the shooters, came just five days after the shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs.

Three years ago, in July 2012, journalist Mark Follman heard about the Aurora, Colo., movie theater shooting rampage that left 12 people dead and felt compelled to learn more — not just about that incident, but about all the mass shootings that were occurring in America.

Follman, the national affairs editor of Mother Jones, began looking for information online, but it soon became evident that no good databases about the subject existed.

Refugee Nonprofits: Texas Response Is What ISIS Would Want

Nov 17, 2015
UNHCR via Texas Tribune

A day after about half of the country’s governors promised to block Syrian refugees from resettling in their states, religious and nonprofit leaders warned those governors that their actions could separate families and cause irreparable damage to public sentiment toward refugees.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Among those shocked by what happened Friday in Paris: Sihem Bouhallouf. She lives in the Paris suburbs and was visiting her Dallas-based employer when the attacks happened.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

The Islamic State group is claiming responsibility for an attack at a Garland center exhibiting cartoon depictions of the Prophet Muhammad.

Ivan Pierre Aguirre / Texas Tribune

The Democrat challenging Republican John Cornyn for his U.S. Senate seat knows he has an uphill battle against a better funded, established candidate. So why is David Alameel running?

Roadside pictures / Flickr

Yesterday, President Obama announced plans for air strikes in Syria and Iraq against the terrorist group ISIS - and today marks 13 years since the 9/11 attacks. The question has resurfaced: how similar is ISIS to Al Qaeda? Two foreign policy experts debated that today on Think ahead of a panel discussion at SMU.

Obama Orders Airstrikes In Syria, Saying U.S. Will 'Take Out' Islamic State

Sep 10, 2014
White House/YouTube/PBS

President Barack Obama authorized U.S. airstrikes inside Syria for the first time Wednesday night, along with expanded strikes in Iraq as part of "a steady, relentless effort" to root out Islamic State extremists and their spreading reign of terror.