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hacking

Equifax, an international credit reporting agency, has announced that a cybersecurity breach exposed the personal information of 143 million U.S. consumers. In a statement released Thursday, the Atlanta-based agency acknowledged that "criminals exploited a U.S. website application vulnerability to gain access to certain files."

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Former CIA Director John Brennan testifies Tuesday — on Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and Russia's use of "active measures" — before the House Intelligence Committee. Brennan is also expected to be questioned about the many leaks regarding national security issues since President Trump took office.

From Texas Standard:

The next military conflict might not start with a bomb, but with a blackout.

National security experts have long warned that the United States’ infrastructure was vulnerable to hackers abroad. A few high profile cases have made headlines in recent years. In 2012 and 2013, Russian hackers were able to get into the U.S. public utilities and power generators to send and receive encrypted messages.

 


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High school and college students from across North America will be in Dallas this weekend for what’s being called a hackathon. 

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A writer linked to online hacking collective Anonymous has been sentenced to prison for threatening an FBI agent and two other federal counts in a closely watched case.

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Last week, cyber attackers took on targets ranging from the White House to the town of Cleburne in North Texas.

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So who’s on healthcare.gov? Turns out it’s not just people searching for health care. The site is also attracting hackers — a Department of Homeland Security official told lawmakers there’s been “a handful” of attempts so far. National cyber security expert Fred Chang, who’s now a professor at SMU in Dallas, has been called to examine concerns about lack of privacy of users of the website.

Help Wanted: Hackers

May 8, 2013
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The Obama administration this week accused China’s military of mounting attacks on American government computer systems and defense contractors. Commentator Rena Pederson says it’s just one example of a growing problem – one that could be at least partly addressed in the classroom.