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Facebook says 126 million people may have seen Russian content aimed at influencing Americans. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill want to weed out Russian operatives and extremist propaganda from Facebook.

But savvy marketers — people who've used Facebook's advertising platform since its inception — say that social media giant will find it hard to banish nefarious actors because its technology is designed to be wide open and simple to use.

Facebook will provide the contents of 3,000 ads purchased by a Russian agency to Congress. The political ads ran during the 2016 presidential election campaign. The move comes amid growing pressure on the social network from members of Congress to release the ads.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg live-streamed a statement in which he said that his company was "actively working" with the U.S. government in the ongoing Russia investigations.

Faced with a recent spate of violent videos and hate speech posted by users on its network, Facebook has announced plans for a heap of hires: 3,000 new employees worldwide to review and react to reports of harm and harassment.

"Over the last few weeks, we've seen people hurting themselves and others on Facebook — either live or in video posted later. It's heartbreaking, and I've been reflecting on how we can do better for our community," CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced Wednesday in a Facebook post.

Apple, Facebook, Google and Microsoft are among 97 tech companies that filed court papers supporting a challenge to President Trump's ban on immigration from seven majority-Muslim nations, calling the executive order unlawful, discriminatory and arbitrary and saying that it would hurt their businesses.

Trump's executive order enacting the ban "has had immediate, adverse effects on the employees of American businesses," the companies say, warning that the ban also poses long-term risks.

In the U.S., we guzzle down data – on our phones and computers – and generally don’t think much about where all that content is stored. It’s stored in places called data centers, and they’re a fundamental part of the infrastructure of the 21st century. The problem: Many of them are stuck in the past. A few companies building data centers in Texas though are trying to boost energy efficiency.

Shutterstock

If you’ve ever wondered where your data is stored – maybe those family vacation photos, your medical records, podcasts – they could be here: in a highly-secure, grey building north of Dallas called Digital Realty.

Dianna Douglas

For every exasperated teacher who feels like students have become surgically attached to smartphones, a new study from the Pew Research Center confirms that it’s true. A quarter of teens say they are online all day long with their phones.

Messaging Apps Draw Teens Away From Facebook

Dec 1, 2014
Christina Ulsh / KERA News

Teenagers are heavy users of social media that keeps their thoughts, actions, and whereabouts private, a stark reversal from five years ago when the goal for many teens on social media was collecting public likes and friends. Here's a look at what kids are doing with their phones when their teachers face the board.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

A little travel tech could help you get to your turkey on time.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Flight running late? Searching for baggage? Forget standing in line. Send a tweet or Facebook message. A growing number of airlines are hiring social media first responders to help with customer relations, and Southwest Airlines has just joined the club. They now have nine “social care” representatives working seven days a week, eighteen hours a day.

Lakewood PTA

An East Dallas group of residents is talking about creating an independent school district for the White Rock Lake area. They say the Dallas school district is too big and mismanaged. Former State Rep. Allen Vaught created a Facebook page, which now has more than 2,500 likes.

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

Students learning Arabic at Central Junior High in Bedford have three teachers – the two in their classroom and another one 5,000 miles away. In Morocco. Once a month, the class calls him up on Skype. The students practice speaking Arabic and learn something about breaking down cultural barriers, too.

 

The family of Justin Carter, the 19-year-old Texas gamer who made offensive Facebook comments that landed him in jail, is working with new urgency to get his $500,000 bail reduced because they say he's getting beat up behind bars.

Patrick Sheehan

It’s Holocaust Remembrance Week – and that remembering is getting tougher, because so few survivors remain. That’s where Dallas documentarian Dylan Hollingsworth comes in. He’s traveling the world, recording and photographing survivors. But the portraits and audio he produces aren’t purposed for a gallery opening, a library or or a coffee table book.