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Temperatures topping 100 degrees and heat effects making it feel even hotter caused an all-time record hourly demand for electricity on Texas' biggest electrical grid.

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As temperatures climb above 100 degrees, the grid operator for Texas has urged conservation during peak electric demand hours.

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Energy Future Holdings filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization Tuesday after agreeing with key financial stakeholders to keep its power-producing businesses operating in Texas while it reduces roughly $40 billion in debt.

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Demand for electricity in Texas this morning set a new winter record.

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas reports peak use at 57,277 megawatts in the hour ending at 8 a.m. The previous winter record was 57,265 megawatts in February 2011.

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A blast of arctic cold hit North Texas Sunday night and Monday. And it’s sticking around a bit longer.

Here are five things you should know about this blast of arctic air:

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Update, 12:51 p.m. Monday: The operator of the electric transmission grid for most of Texas is encouraging folks to conserve energy during this cold snap.

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas had warned Monday morning that rolling blackouts may be necessary unless consumers reduced their use of electricity. An email warning issued by ERCOT said "risk of power outages exist throughout Texas."

But ERCOT later said the system is recovering and blackouts are no longer being considered.

Texas prison officials are changing the way they do executions due to a drug shortage.

With temperatures expected to top 100 degrees today, ERCOT -- the state’s electrical grid -- is asking people to conserve electricity.

Retail gasoline prices across Texas continue their slide and are down another nickel a gallon this week to average $3.51.

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An insurance industry group estimates the tornadoes and hailstorms that caused scattered devastation in North Texas last week has prompted damage claims topping $300 million so far and could top $500 million.