Elections | KERA News

Elections

PBS Newshour / YouTube

With less than one month until the election, Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the second presidential debate Sunday night at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

Ahead of the second presidential debate Sunday night, the secret Donald Trump audiotape of him bragging about groping and kissing women — and let's be clear, if he did what he's bragging that he did, it would be assault — has shaken the presidential race and is reshaping the presidential map.

Yes, the majority of Trump's supporters are likely to stay with him, but any chance he had at winning over those persuadable voters might very well be gone.

Erik Hersman / Flickr

Tuesday is the deadline to register to vote for the upcoming election on Nov. 8.  

Since the deadline is coming quickly, your best bet is to register in person. Here are a few tips to make sure you can vote next month.

 

It's hard to be any more gobsmacked about the state of the presidential race right now, after a video of Donald Trump making vulgar comments about women surfaced Friday, prompting more than 30 prominent Republicans to call for him to step aside as the nominee.

Excerpts from speeches Hillary Clinton was paid to give to big banks suggest a relationship with Wall Street that is a lot more familiar and pragmatic than the fiery rhetoric she has sometimes used on the campaign trail.

"I represented all of you for eight years. I had great relations and worked so close together after 9/11 to rebuild downtown, and a lot of respect for the work you do and the people who do it," she told a Goldman Sachs symposium on Oct. 24, 2013.

The controversial whistleblower organization WikiLeaks on Friday released emails that they say are linked to Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta.

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Jim Young/Reuters

From the Industrial Revolution to the dawn of the internet, technology has always posed challenges for presidents, and that will be no different when our next president is sworn into office in January 2017.

We're taking a look at a few of the thorny problems that will confront either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump. Some of these issues will not surprise you, since they have been mentioned frequently on the campaign trail, but others have received almost no attention at all.

1. Our education system doesn’t prioritize creativity and experimentation.

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Kim Adams

At Tower Grove Christian Academy in St. Louis, Missouri, Donna Kohlberg said she is disgusted with the election, namely the behavior of both candidates, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

Still, the teacher, assistant principal and volleyball coach plans to watch the presidential debate — which takes place Sunday in St. Louis — in hopes of  hearing more about issues like Trump University, Clinton’s actions in Benghazi, and the candidates' plans for how they would change the economy.

From Texas Standard:

Undecided voters are no myth. So who are they?

Blanca Morales, like 84 million others, tuned in last week to watch the first debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. But it didn’t help her decide who she’ll pick on Election Day. If anything, it complicated matters.

 


Little has gone as expected in this extraordinary presidential cycle, so we should have known Tuesday's vice presidential debate would have a twist or two in it, too.

Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence each represented three clients in their 90-minute debate from Farmville, Va. The two former attorneys pleaded the case for their respective principals (Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump), to be sure, but also for their respective parties and for themselves.

The only vice presidential debate between Democrat Tim Kaine and Republican Mike Pence was a bit more heated than expected. For 90 minutes on Tuesday night they sparred on foreign policy, abortion and immigration. But the biggest shadows hanging over them were their running mates.

PBS Newshour / YouTube

Democrat Tim Kaine and Republican Mike Pence square off in the vice presidential debate Tuesday night at Longwood University in Farmville, Va.

This evening's face-off between the 2016 vice presidential hopefuls certainly won't have the pizzazz — or inevitable enmity — that last week's debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton had.

KERA asked for questions about this year's election, and you delivered! Over the past few months, your public radio stations across Texas have compiled queries from voters all over the state. It’s part of a project we're calling "Texas Decides."

Donald Trump's campaign is responding to a New York Times report that the real estate mogul claimed hundreds of millions of dollars in losses on tax returns in 1995 — an amount that could have allowed him to legally avoid paying income taxes for many years.

The 1995 tax records obtained by the newspaper show Trump as having reported a $916 million loss on personal income tax returns during that year.

The vice presidential nominees, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, will meet on the debate stage Tuesday.

It'll be two traditional politicians facing off in a non-traditional election year: Kaine as the safe and even boring choice by Hillary Clinton and Pence as the calm, unflappable balance to Donald Trump's bombast.

When it comes to the issues, Kaine and Clinton mostly agree. Among other things, they want to raise taxes on the wealthy, expand gun control legislation, and they both support President Obama's executive orders on immigration.

You could see the contrast in the eyes of the respective candidates' spokespersons, surrogates and family members after the first presidential debate of 2016 had wrapped.

As always, earnest efforts were made on both sides to claim victory — even insist on it — after the nationally televised clash between Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump.

"Trump was especially strong on the issues in the first 45 minutes," said former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski on CNN.

PBS Newshour / YouTube

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head-to-head Monday night in the first presidential debate, which is anticipated to be one of the most-watched political events ever.

After Endorsement, Cruz Refuses To Say Trump Is Fit For The Presidency

Sep 26, 2016
Erich Schlegel for The Texas Tribune

One day after endorsing Donald Trump for president, Texas U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz refused Saturday to say whether he thinks the Republican nominee is fit to lead the country.

For months now, Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump have been sparring at each other from afar. On Monday they'll do it face to face, on a stage at Hofstra University on Long Island in New York.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will be together on stage for the first time on Monday. Both candidates have a lot at stake when they meet at Hofstra University in New York for the first of three presidential debates, this one with moderator Lester Holt of NBC News.

Each has different opportunities and challenges in the debates. Here are four things Clinton will have to think about. We also looked at four things to watch for Trump.

On Monday, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton will face off in their first debate at Hofstra University in New York. In a race this close and with as many as 100 million people watching, the debates present both candidates with chances to seize momentum but potential pitfalls as well.

Here are four things to think about as Donald Trump prepares for the debates. We also looked at four things to watch for Clinton.

GEORGE BUSH PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

Adding to potentially the most awkward Thanksgiving ever, George H.W. Bush is reportedly voting for Hillary Clinton this November.

The first presidential debate, to be held next Monday, Sept. 26, at Hofstra University in New York, will be divided into three 30-minute segments on three topics, according to the Commission On Presidential Debates co-chairman, Frank Fahrenkopf.

That's a bit different from the original announcement for the first debate, which said there would be six 15-minute segments. Farhrenkopf told NPR that it was moderator Lester Holt's decision to combine the segments.

The topics will be: the Direction of America, Achieving Prosperity and Securing America.

Over the past few weeks, we've been compiling questions about this year's election sent to us by voters across Texas. It’s part of a project we're calling "Texas Decides."

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick Named Trump's Texas Chairman

Sep 16, 2016
Bob Daemmrich / The Texas Tribune

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick is taking an official role with the campaign of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, serving as his Texas state chairman.

andem / flickr

In recent weeks, several North Texas school districts have held or considered having tax ratification elections.

KERA News

The Dallas Morning News endorsed Hillary Clinton for president today. It's the first time the newspaper's editorial board has recommended a Democrat for president in a general election since World War II.

In Texas, there’s far more at stake in the 2016 election season than who takes the White House. The state is battling with federal courts over the voter ID law. There’s dysfunction in the Texas Democratic and Republican parties. And demographic change is accelerating.

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