Elections | KERA News

Elections

Donald Trump's campaign is responding to a New York Times report that the real estate mogul claimed hundreds of millions of dollars in losses on tax returns in 1995 — an amount that could have allowed him to legally avoid paying income taxes for many years.

The 1995 tax records obtained by the newspaper show Trump as having reported a $916 million loss on personal income tax returns during that year.

The vice presidential nominees, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, will meet on the debate stage Tuesday.

It'll be two traditional politicians facing off in a non-traditional election year: Kaine as the safe and even boring choice by Hillary Clinton and Pence as the calm, unflappable balance to Donald Trump's bombast.

When it comes to the issues, Kaine and Clinton mostly agree. Among other things, they want to raise taxes on the wealthy, expand gun control legislation, and they both support President Obama's executive orders on immigration.

You could see the contrast in the eyes of the respective candidates' spokespersons, surrogates and family members after the first presidential debate of 2016 had wrapped.

As always, earnest efforts were made on both sides to claim victory — even insist on it — after the nationally televised clash between Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump.

"Trump was especially strong on the issues in the first 45 minutes," said former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski on CNN.

PBS Newshour / YouTube

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head-to-head Monday night in the first presidential debate, which is anticipated to be one of the most-watched political events ever.

After Endorsement, Cruz Refuses To Say Trump Is Fit For The Presidency

Sep 26, 2016
Erich Schlegel for The Texas Tribune

One day after endorsing Donald Trump for president, Texas U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz refused Saturday to say whether he thinks the Republican nominee is fit to lead the country.

For months now, Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump have been sparring at each other from afar. On Monday they'll do it face to face, on a stage at Hofstra University on Long Island in New York.

Debates have been a mainstay of presidential campaigns, it seems forever. But that's not quite the case: The first general election debate didn't occur until 1960, in a Chicago TV studio, between Vice President Richard M. Nixon and Senator John F. Kennedy.

Monday's debate between Clinton and Trump will take place on the 56th anniversary of that first debate.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will be together on stage for the first time on Monday. Both candidates have a lot at stake when they meet at Hofstra University in New York for the first of three presidential debates, this one with moderator Lester Holt of NBC News.

Each has different opportunities and challenges in the debates. Here are four things Clinton will have to think about. We also looked at four things to watch for Trump.

On Monday, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton will face off in their first debate at Hofstra University in New York. In a race this close and with as many as 100 million people watching, the debates present both candidates with chances to seize momentum but potential pitfalls as well.

Here are four things to think about as Donald Trump prepares for the debates. We also looked at four things to watch for Clinton.

GEORGE BUSH PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

Adding to potentially the most awkward Thanksgiving ever, George H.W. Bush is reportedly voting for Hillary Clinton this November.

The first presidential debate, to be held next Monday, Sept. 26, at Hofstra University in New York, will be divided into three 30-minute segments on three topics, according to the Commission On Presidential Debates co-chairman, Frank Fahrenkopf.

That's a bit different from the original announcement for the first debate, which said there would be six 15-minute segments. Farhrenkopf told NPR that it was moderator Lester Holt's decision to combine the segments.

The topics will be: the Direction of America, Achieving Prosperity and Securing America.

Over the past few weeks, we've been compiling questions about this year's election sent to us by voters across Texas. It’s part of a project we're calling "Texas Decides."

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick Named Trump's Texas Chairman

Sep 16, 2016
Bob Daemmrich / The Texas Tribune

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick is taking an official role with the campaign of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, serving as his Texas state chairman.

andem / flickr

In recent weeks, several North Texas school districts have held or considered having tax ratification elections.

KERA News

The Dallas Morning News endorsed Hillary Clinton for president today. It's the first time the newspaper's editorial board has recommended a Democrat for president in a general election since World War II.

In Texas, there’s far more at stake in the 2016 election season than who takes the White House. The state is battling with federal courts over the voter ID law. There’s dysfunction in the Texas Democratic and Republican parties. And demographic change is accelerating.

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All this week, public radio stations across the country are taking part in NPR’s “A Nation Engaged” series – exploring America’s place in the world. 

FLICKR/GAGE SKIDMORE

Donald Trump steered clear of fundraising throughout the GOP primary, but has embraced donations since then. But are North Texas donors embracing him? 

Trump Makes Unusual Swing Through Texas

Aug 23, 2016
Allison V. Smith / The Texas Tribune

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is making an unusual general election swing through Texas with a series of events — some public — planned Tuesday across the reliably red state.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / Texas Standard

Tim Kaine, the Democratic nominee for vice president, is in Texas this week – and he responded to the latest controversial comments from Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

5 Things To Know About Tim Kaine

Jul 23, 2016

After weeks of speculation, Hillary Clinton's campaign has announced she will tap Tim Kaine as her running mate.

Appearing on stage together for the first time since Friday's vice presidential announcement, Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine made a push for voters of color by highlighting his record on diversity and civil rights.

Kaine also spoke about gun violence, job creation, equal pay and raising equal pay — all mainstays of Clinton's campaign.

Clinton said Kaine has "lived" the values of diversity. That, she argued, is in contrast the GOP ticket and last week's Republican National Convention. "Tim Kaine is everything Donald Trump and Mike Pence are not," she said.

Tim Kaine is boring. Just ask him.

"I am boring," the man Hillary Clinton picked on Friday night to be her running mate said last month on NBC's "Meet The Press."

The Virginia senator tried to play it off with something of a dad joke: "But boring is the fastest-growing demographic in this country," he laughed.

So why would Clinton pick "boring" to be her vice president? (And it's not because there are suddenly loads of more boring people out there voting as a bloc.)

Hillary Clinton has chosen Tim Kaine to be her vice presidential running mate. The Virginia senator has been an elected official — including mayor, governor and senator — for over 20 years and was once the chairman of the Democratic National Committee. He was also on President Obama's shortlist of running mates in 2008.

Donald Trump has officially introduced Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his vice presidential running mate.

"I've found the leader who will help us deliver a safe society and a prosperous, really prosperous society for all Americans," Trump said at a campaign event in New York Saturday. "Indiana Governor Mike Pence was my first choice."

Trump spoke at length about his admiration for Pence's record in Indiana. "He's really got the skills of a highly talented executive," he said.

This post was updated at 2:38 pm

The lingering chasm between presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and her chief primary rival was bridged Tuesday, with Sen. Bernie Sanders teaming up with Clinton at a campaign event, where he formally endorsed Clinton's bid for the White House.

Donald Trump laid out a series of campaign promises and leveled a slew of accusations at rival Hillary Clinton Wednesday. Read more about the speech here.

NPR's politics team (with some help from our colleagues on the international desk) has annotated Trump's speech, below. Portions we commented on are bolded, followed by analysis and fact check in italics. We will update further.

Bernie Sanders said Thursday night that his major political task for the next five months is to "make sure that Donald Trump is defeated and defeated badly."

Against Backdrop Of Trump Rallies, Texas Democrats To Gather

Jun 16, 2016
Jacob Villanueva / Texas Tribune

As Donald Trump hosts rallies Thursday and Friday in Dallas and Houston, as many as 10,000 staunch anti-Trump Democrats are expected to gather in San Antonio for the state party's three-day convention.

 

MIKE STONE / REUTERS

Democrats are flocking to San Antonio to kick off the state party convention today. In Dallas, Donald Trump supporters – and protestors – will rally at 7 o’clock tonight at Gilley’s in the Cedars area just south of Downtown. Before that, Trump will hit up GOP donors for campaign cash.

Need A Reason To Vote? Here Are A Few

Jun 15, 2016
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This story is part of A Nation Engaged, a collaborative project between NPR and its member stations. This week's question: "Does my vote matter? More than 4.2 million Texans cast a ballot in March’s primaries. That’s only about 20 percent of eligible voters in the state. Today on "Think," Lauren Silverman spoke with North Texas political organizers about convincing people that their votes count.

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