Education | KERA News

Education

Liberty High School in Frisco has grown rapidly and become more diverse since opening in 2006.
Credit Lara Solt / KERA News special contributor

Every week, KERA reporters go inside the classroom, meeting students, teachers and administrators, to explore the latest in education in North Texas. KERA's ongoing education coverage is part of the national public broadcasting initiative American Graduate

Explore in-depth education multimedia projects: Race, Poverty and the Changing Face of Schools, a look at the changing demographics at four North Texas high schools; What’s Next For The Class Of 17?, stories about North Texas students from eighth grade to graduation; Homeless in High School, how schools and kids deal with homelessness; and Generation One, meet first-generation Texans who are reshaping schools.

Support for KERA’s education coverage is made possible in part by:

Bill Zeeble / KERA public radio

Texas has the lowest special education enrollment numbers in the nation. Parents of some special needs students say they’ve spent years fighting with Texas schools to get services for their kids — services schools are required to provide under federal law. 

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

In Fort Worth public schools, just three out of every 10 third graders are reading at grade level. That’s a problem the school district, city and business community is trying to fix. They’ve just formed a coalition to boost literacy.

KERA visited one elementary school that’s been touted as a model for the district.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

A Dallas elementary school teacher is in jail on felony charges of continuous sexual abuse and indecency with a child.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

High schools have been teaching business courses for years. But a curriculum new to North Texas is bringing a hands-on approach to eight schools this year.  In our continuing American Graduate Initiative, we visit a class in Fort Worth’s Trimble Tech High School.

Lessons From A Substitute Teacher

Oct 3, 2016
Shutterstock

Nicholson Baker earned just $70 a day working as a substitute teacher in Maine public schools. What he gained, though, was a wealth of insight as to what happens in the American education system.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

The Dallas school district launched a program last year designed to turn around its most troubled schools. It’s called ACE – accelerated campus excellence. Last year, six of the seven ACE schools got off the state’s improvement required list. 

Krystina Martinez / KERA News

Marcelo Cavazos, the man who leads Arlington’s schools system, was named Texas Superintendent of the Year this afternoon. The honor came at the annual Texas Association of School Boards conference in Houston – and it includes a $5,000 prize. The five finalists also included another North Texan, DeSoto superintendent David Harris.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

There’s room for improvement for Texas public school children according to Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath. He was in Dallas on Wednesday talking about the state of education in Texas. Morath said the state needs to do more to better prepare students for the future.

Houston Public Media

As of this fall, the eight largest cities in Texas have Latino superintendents leading the school districts. The latest to join the list: Richard Carranza in Houston. He impressed the Houston Independent School District with his credentials — and his voice.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

On Tuesday morning, the Bush Institute hosted some Texas mayors and superintendents to talk about education -- and a new online tool that looks at education data from more than 100 cities. For North Texas officials, the data is a call to action.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

With a new school superintendent taking over this fall in Houston, every one of Texas’ eight largest cities now has a Latino running the school district. That’s a big deal in a state with a surging Hispanic population and a history of political underrepresentation. In the first chapter of a statewide collaborative series, KERA digs into the implications for students, schools and the politics of education.

The Secret To Raising Smart Kids

Sep 15, 2016
Shutterstock

There’s plenty of advice out there for parents on how to raise smart kids. What works, though, is still a question researchers are trying to answer.

andem / flickr

In recent weeks, several North Texas school districts have held or considered having tax ratification elections.

Gay and Lesbian Alliance

Transgender issues have dominated headlines recently. In particular, students. That leaves educators scrambling for information on the best ways to help. In Collin County, educators showed up for a session on what it means to be transgender. And many of them were school counselors. 

Why A College Degree Might Not Be Best For Everyone

Aug 31, 2016
Shutterstock

College is usually seen as the best path to economic success. Today on Think, as a part of KERA’s American Graduate initiative – Krys Boyd talked with Katherine Newman, provost of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, about why the “college for all model” isn’t working for everyone. She is the co-author of, “Reskilling America: Learning to Labor in the Twenty-First Century.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

We met Denzel Bailey, a UT-Arlington student, a year ago. He's a homeless student in college. He spent the summer with his grandparents in south Fort Worth. Bailey is entering his senior year – and trying to balance work and school, while hoping to find a place he can call home.

How To Talk To Kids About Racial Violence

Aug 26, 2016
Shutterstock

All week as North Texas students returned to school, we’ listened in on conversations about race with parents, teachers and students. On Think -- as part of KERA’s American Graduate series “The First Week” -- Krys Boyd spoke to a panel of child psychologists about ways to help young people process the racial violence that occurred across the country this summer.

This week, in an American Graduate series called “The First Week,” we’ve been listening to conversations about race after a summer of racial turmoil in America and police shootings in Dallas. We’ve heard from parents, students and a teacher. Today, it's Gregg Anderson, a school resource officer who’s building relationships in the  Carrollton-Farmers Branch school district.

Christopher Connelly/KERA News

It’s the first week of school in many districts across North Texas, and students are returning to the classroom after a summer of racial turmoil in America and police shootings in Dallas. 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

In this series, The First Week, KERA's reporters are listening in on the conversations about race happening in and around North Texas schools. Today, what students are saying about the violence this summer: police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota, and a gunman's July ambush that killed five law officers in downtown Dallas.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Over the next five days, in a series called "The First Week," we’ll listen in on the conversations students, parents, educators and police officers are having after a summer of racial turmoil in the U.S. and police shootings in Dallas. First, we look at race through the perspective of a black family in Arlington.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

The Dallas school board Thursday night voted against putting a tax ratification election before voters this fall. 

Shutterstock

Hate tests? The Dallas school district has some good news for you. This summer, the district announced it’s going to nix one-third of its assessments. 

Dallas Independent School District

Nearly 94 percent of districts and around 88 percent of public schools in Texas have met minimum education standards in the final year before shifting to an A-F letter grade accountability system.

UNT Dallas College of Law

The University of North Texas at Dallas has been trying to build a different kind of law school -- one that’s more affordable and targets diverse and non-traditional students. 

Ken Bennett / Wake Forest University School of Law

Two North Texas universities recently decided to no longer enroll new students in their evening law school programs.

UNT Dallas

The UNT Dallas law school program is in jeopardy of not receiving accreditation from the American Bar Association. 

For a moment, let's pretend.

That everything you know about America's public education system — the bitter politics and arcane funding policies, the rules and countless reasons our schools work (or don't) the way they do — is suddenly negotiable.

Pretend the obstacles to change have melted like butter on hot blacktop.

Now ask yourself: What could — and should — we do differently?

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

For the 20th year in a row, Dallas held its Mayor’s Back to School Fair today. The event at Fair Park is for low-income families who can get free school supplies and health screenings. It can really make a difference.  

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Around the country, it’s been challenging for law school graduates to find jobs as lawyers. As a result, law school enrollment has gone down in some places. That’s not deterring one North Texas school. The UNT Dallas College of Law is trying to attract a different type of student.

Pages