Ebola in Dallas | KERA News

Ebola in Dallas

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On Sept. 30, 2014, the United States had its first diagnosis of the Ebola virus. Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian national, tested positive for the virus days after he was initially sent home from a Dallas emergency room. Many questions arose since that fatal diagnosis: how two nurses contracted the virus from Duncan, the ability of Texas Health Presbyterian to keep its workers safe, whether Duncan received proper medical care, and more.

Here you’ll find KERA’s coverage of events, including radio stories, live blogs, and a timeline detailing what happened that fall.

Center for Strategic & International Studies

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Watch a new documentary on Ebola in Dallas; Dallas takes part in exclusive McDonald’s menu expansion experiment; Whole Foods filed a counter-lawsuit against an Austin pastor in heated cake matters; and more.

Jim Tuttle / The Dallas Morning News

In 2014, Americans watched from afar as the Ebola virus raged through West Africa, killing thousands and threatening millions. Until Sept. 30, when a Liberian man named Thomas Eric Duncan tested positive in a Dallas emergency room.

An Austin Lab Tries To Create An Ebola Vaccine

Sep 29, 2015
XBiotech

Dallas faced an unprecedented public health scare in the fall of 2014 when a Liberian national was diagnosed with the Ebola virus. KERA is exploring lessons learned – and taking a deeper look at what happened last year – in a new series called "Surviving Ebola."

Christina Ulsh / KERA News

Less than 24 hours after Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan was confirmed to have the Ebola virus, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins was thrust into a leadership role few people had trained for.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

A year after Ebola arrived in Dallas, it might seem like hospitals and clinics are back to normal – except for the leftover hand sanitizer pumps and the occasional sign warning about international travel.

Cooper Neill / Texas Tribune

A year ago this month, the first patient diagnosed with Ebola on U.S. soil entered Texas Health Presbyterian in Dallas. On Friday, the hospital is releasing findings from an independent panel that reviewed what happened and what went wrong.

Facebook

Last year, when Thomas Eric Duncan became the first person to die from Ebola in the U.S., he left behind his fiancée, Louise Troh. On Monday's Think, Krys Boyd talked to Troh about how she leaned on her family and faith to make it through.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Seven months after Thomas Eric Duncan became the first person to die of Ebola in the U.S. last year, the hospital where he was treated reached a settlement with his family. Texas Health Resources agreed to create the Thomas Eric Duncan Memorial Fund in his honor. The $125,000 in seed money will go towards training nurses and doctors in Liberia. 

Texas Health Resources Facebook

An attorney for one of the two nurses who contracted Ebola at a Dallas hospital last fall says her client is going ahead with plans to sue her employer.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

A nurse who contracted Ebola last year at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas has filed a lawsuit against her employer, Texas Health Resources.

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