Ebola | KERA News

Ebola

Center for Strategic & International Studies

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Watch a new documentary on Ebola in Dallas; Dallas takes part in exclusive McDonald’s menu expansion experiment; Whole Foods filed a counter-lawsuit against an Austin pastor in heated cake matters; and more.

James Gathany / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

By now many people in North Texas have heard of the Zika virus, but few have firsthand experience. Dr. David Vanderpool does. Vanderpool was raised and educated in Dallas and has seen the toll the disease is taking south of the border, in the poorest country of the Americas – Haiti. He says whether or not the Zika virus spreads to the U.S., we need to be paying close attention.

It's been exactly one year since the CDC confirmed that Thomas Eric Duncan had Ebola. He had flown from Liberia to Dallas to visit his fiancé, and became the first person diagnosed with the deadly virus on American soil.

During his stay at Texas Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, two nurses also fell ill with Ebola. Duncan died, but the nurses survived, as did a handful of Americans who fell ill in West Africa but were transported back to the United States for care.

A Kramer / Texas Children's Hospital

Dallas faced an unprecedented public health scare in the fall of 2014 when a Liberian national was diagnosed with the Ebola virus. KERA is exploring lessons learned – and taking a deeper look at what happened last year – in a new series called Surviving Ebola.

Jim Tuttle/The Dallas Morning News

Dallas faced an unprecedented public health scare in the fall of 2014 when a Liberian national was diagnosed with the Ebola virus. KERA is exploring lessons learned – and taking a deeper look at what happened last year – in a new series called Surviving Ebola.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

A year after Ebola arrived in Dallas, it might seem like hospitals and clinics are back to normal – except for the leftover hand sanitizer pumps and the occasional sign warning about international travel.

Cooper Neill / Texas Tribune

A year ago this month, the first patient diagnosed with Ebola on U.S. soil entered Texas Health Presbyterian in Dallas. On Friday, the hospital is releasing findings from an independent panel that reviewed what happened and what went wrong.

Frederick A. Murphy / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Slowly, West Africa is prying itself free from the grip of the Ebola virus. Today on Think, Krys Boyd talked about why it’s tough for scientists to track the virus once an outbreak ends with David Quammen, who writes about the topic in the July issue of National Geographic.

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Last year, when Thomas Eric Duncan became the first person to die from Ebola in the U.S., he left behind his fiancée, Louise Troh. On Monday's Think, Krys Boyd talked to Troh about how she leaned on her family and faith to make it through.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Seven months after Thomas Eric Duncan became the first person to die of Ebola in the U.S. last year, the hospital where he was treated reached a settlement with his family. Texas Health Resources agreed to create the Thomas Eric Duncan Memorial Fund in his honor. The $125,000 in seed money will go towards training nurses and doctors in Liberia. 

Cooper Neill/Texas Tribune

Texas Health Resources, which attracted worldwide headlines last fall for the way one of its hospitals misdiagnosed a patient who had Ebola, has been named one of the country’s best companies for workers.

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A North Texas nurse who contracted Ebola last fall says the Dallas hospital where she worked and its parent company failed her.

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The top doctor in Texas could impose immediate mandatory quarantine on patients infected with Ebola or other contagious diseases under sweeping legislation being introduced at the Capitol.

Time magazine

Doctors, nurses and others who fought back against Ebola have been named Time’s Person of the Year for 2014. They include Kent Brantly, the Fort Worth-trained doctor who contracted Ebola in Liberia, as well as Nina Pham and Amber Vinson, the two Dallas nurses who became infected with Ebola after treating an Ebola patient.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Dallas County health officials announced Tuesday they are monitoring two health care workers for Ebola, although they don’t show any symptoms of the virus.

Texas Health Resources

The Ebola monitoring period in Dallas has come to an end. The last person who had contact with the three Dallas Ebola patients was cleared from twice-daily monitoring late Friday afternoon, the Texas Department of State Health Services said.

Facebook/The Texas Tribune

The Ebola virus has dominated the news in North Texas since it was announced on Sept. 29 that a man at a Dallas hospital might have the deadly disease. On Sept. 30, medical tests confirmed that Thomas Eric Duncan had the Ebola virus. 

Krystina Martinez / KERA News

Friday is a big day in North Texas: It’s the last day of monitoring for any North Texan who might have been exposed to Ebola. If all goes well – and so far, it has -- Dallas will be Ebola-free.

Help Amber Vinson / Facebook

Amber Vinson, the Dallas nurse who flew on a commercial jet before being diagnosed with Ebola, says she wasn't careless or reckless.

Perry Issues New Ebola Monitoring Recommendations

Nov 4, 2014
Texas Tribune livestream

Gov. Rick Perry announced Tuesday he is recommending that the state should implement a new classification system for monitoring health care workers and others returning from West African nations dealing with the Ebola outbreak.

People living in the United States have little to no reason to fear contracting Ebola, a deadly viral illness causing an epidemic in West Africa. Yet on Friday night, some Americans will dress up in hazmat suits akin to what health workers wear when treating an Ebola patient.

And, of course, there's even a "sexy" version.

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Researchers hope to slow down Ebola even more … using robots.

Igor Stevanovic / Shutterstock

Five stories that have North Texas talking: A nurse and UT Arlington grad is pushing back against forced Ebola quarantines, Republican Dan Patrick has avoided the media in his campaign, what keeps affluent North Texans up at night, and more.

WFAA stream

Five stories that have North Texas talking: nonprofits do not want donations from Ebola house decorator, Texas college students are wary of student loans, there’s a nine-year-old stand-up comedian in Dallas, and more.

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Five stories that have North Texas talking: a Dallas man’s Halloween decorations are raising eyebrows, a historic downtown Dallas building gets a revival, cooler temperatures aren’t helping the region’s water shortages, and more.

Krystina Martinez / KERA News

Cole Edmonson has spent the last month facing the biggest challenge of his career. He’s chief nursing officer at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, which means he oversees 1,300 nurses. One of them, Nina Pham, was declared Ebola-free and released today from the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. The other, Amber Vinson, has tested negative for the virus but is still being treated in Atlanta.

Edmonson sat down with KERA’s vice president of news, Rick Holter, for this week’s Friday Conversation.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

A Doctors Without Borders physician who recently returned to New York City after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus, according to preliminary test results, city officials said Thursday. He's the fourth confirmed case in the U.S. and the first in the nation's biggest city.

Help Amber Vinson / Facebook

The family of a Dallas nurse who flew to Ohio and was diagnosed with Ebola says doctors no longer detect the virus in her body.

Mike Stone/Getty Images / via PBS

[We will update this story throughout the day.] The financial impact of Ebola on Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas has been significant. Net revenue is down 25.6 percent – or $8.1 million -- in October compared to the first nine months of 2014, according to financial disclosure forms released Wednesday afternoon.

When It Came To Ebola, Control Eluded Texas Leaders

Oct 22, 2014
Marjorie Kamys Cotera / The Texas Tribune

When the Ebola virus first arrived in Texas, Gov. Rick Perry greeted the grave news with trademark swagger.

“There is no place in the world, I will suggest to you, that has better professionals, better ability to address this, than in Texas,” he said at a hastily called press conference, one day after Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan tested positive for Ebola while in isolation at a Dallas hospital.

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