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Dallas Police Department

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Without the right policies in place, putting body cameras on police does nothing to make them more accountable and could exacerbate racial disparities when it comes to policing, civil rights advocates say.

A new scorecard rating the body camera policies of 75 big city police departments across the country finds that the vast majority have lots of room for improvement, including the half dozen Texas departments included in the report.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

In Houston, police say there are solvable property crime cases with no one to solve them. Dallas officers are taking more time to respond to fewer emergency calls, and both cities are slower to get to non-emergency situations.

From Texas Standard:

The saying, you’re only as good as your equipment, has serious implications for first responders. A faulty service weapon can mean the difference between life and death for police officers and those they protect, which makes what's happening in Houston all the more frightening.

Facebook / Detroit Police Department

Dallas made a landmark hire this week – Renee Hall will be the first woman to run the city’s police department. Now serving as deputy chief in Detroit, Hall is determined to make her mark in Dallas not just as a woman, but as a standout leader.

Detroit Police Department

Renee Hall will be the first female chief of the Dallas Police Department.

Hall is the permanent replacement for Chief David Brown. He retired in October after leading the department and the city through the aftermath of the July 7 ambush that left five officers dead.

Elizabeth Myong / KERA News special contributor

Researchers in Texas and Florida have released a study on use-of-force incidents within the Dallas Police Department, and they found that white police officers in Dallas do not use force disproportionately against minorities.

Gerald Herbert / AP Photo

Only hours after the ambush that killed five Dallas law enforcement officers, mental health experts began thinking ahead, searching for ways to ease the long-term effects of the attack on the men and women who patrol the nation's ninth-largest city.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

In the year since a gunman killed five officers, Dallas police have been buffeted by the retirement of a chief, a contentious pension battle and a continuing exodus of officers. Despite these challenges, two brand-new officers say they’ve landed in the right place, in a city where they feel they can do some good.

DALLAS HABITAT PHOTOS VIA FLICKR

Update, July 3: Grand Prairie Police Chief Steve Dye withdrew his application, leaving seven candidates to interview.

Dallas City Manager T.C. Broadnax on Wednesday released a list of police chief candidates.

Ashley Landis / The Dallas Morning News via AP, Pool

Hundreds gathered downtown Wednesday for the annual Dallas Police Memorial to honor the city’s fallen officers. This year's ceremony paid special tribute to the five officers who were killed last summer by a lone gunman after a peaceful protest was wrapping up downtown.

LM Otero / AP Photo

Dallas police on Tuesday identified 36-year-old Derick Lamont Brown as the suspected gunman who killed one person and critically wounded a paramedic and another person, during a shooting Monday in an East Dallas neighborhood. 

Dallas Shooting Changed The Conversation About Police In Texas

Dec 27, 2016
Robert W. Hart for The Texas Tribune

In 2016, the state of police-community relations fluctuated with each deadly encounter between law enforcement and civilians across the country. Texas had one of the most high-profile events of the year, when a gunman opened fire in July on Dallas officers as a Black Lives Matter protest wrapped. The year was also marked by efforts to reform the state's criminal justice system, particularly jail conditions.

NBCDFW / YouTube

Police Chief David Brown will retire on Oct. 4 — almost three weeks earlier than he originally planned.

 

NBCDFW / YouTube

Answering reporters' questions for nearly an hour Thursday, Dallas Police Chief David Brown explained why he's retiring and what's next for him after his last day on Oct. 22.

Dallas Police Chief David Brown Says He Will Retire In October

Sep 1, 2016
Dallas Police Department/YouTube

After 33 years on the force, Dallas Police Chief David Brown will retire on Oct. 22. He announced the news on the Dallas Police Department's blog Thursday. 

dallashabitatphotos via flickr

Dallas police officers have been leaving the force in droves in recent years, most of them going to other North Texas departments. 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Several hundred kids filled the Winspear Opera House Thursday not to catch a performance, but to talk to police.

Kevin Lamarque / Reuters

Dallas Police Chief David Brown says several officers testifying on the fatal shooting of five colleagues last month were overwhelmed when they returned to the scene and that some could need up to five years of treatment to recover from the trauma.

Javier Giribet-Vargas / KERA News Special Contributor

The Dallas Police Department says it plans on spending $32 million in overtime this fiscal year – more than the $17 million budgeted.

Patrick Zamarripa's photo via Facebook

One of the five police officers killed in the July 7 downtown Dallas shooting was laid to rest at Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery on Saturday. As part of KERA’s series, “Remembering the Fallen,” we look at the life of 32-year-old Dallas Officer Patricio "Patrick" Zamarripa.

Carlo Allegri / Reuters

Without fail, everyone who talked about Senior Cpl. Lorne Ahrens mentioned how big he was. Six-foot-five, 300 pounds big. And strong.

RAYMOND WAMBSGANS / Flickr

When Dallas Police Chief David Brown announced that Micah Johnson was killed by a robot with a bomb, it raised a lot of questions that we've been trying to answer. 

STEPHANIE KUO/KERA

After the shooting in downtown Dallas last Thursday, hospitals had the difficult task of tending to the injured officers. On Monday, doctors and nurses at Parkland Hospital’s trauma center shared their experiences.

The calculated killing of five uniformed officers would be traumatic for any metropolitan police department in America, but it has fallen especially hard in Dallas, where the police force already suffers from low pay and poor morale.

Citizens in Dallas are rallying around their officers in blue, suggesting the events could be a turning point for the embattled department.

The morning after a gunman targeted and killed five law enforcement officers, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings called it "ironic" that his city was the target of the worst police loss-of-life since the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

Soon after the Thursday night shooting, the first death was confirmed. Overnight, the death toll climbed. By early Friday morning, five officers were dead. At a press conference, Dallas Police Chief David Brown expressed his disbelief.

Police Use of Robot to Kill Dallas Suspect Unprecedented, Experts Say

Jul 8, 2016
JAVIER GIRIBET-VARGAS / KERA NEWS SPECIAL CONTRIBUTOR

The death of a suspect in the Dallas police shootings marks the first time U.S. police officers have used a robot to kill someone, according to Texas and national experts.

Dallas Police, Protesters Were United Before Sniper Attack

Jul 8, 2016
Javier Giribet-Vargas / KERA News Special Contributor

After a long night of chaos and uncertainty, the city is finally quiet.

After Dallas, A Look At Police Training

Jul 8, 2016
GettyImages-545475312.jpg
Molly Wood

In the aftermath of the killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile and the sniper killings in Dallas, there have been calls for policing reforms across the country. Reforms that put an emphasis on de-escalation and diversity in hiring. But in Dallas, that was already happening.

This is a developing story. Last updated 6:18 a.m. ET.

Snipers shot and killed five Dallas law enforcement officers and injured another six at the end of a rally in downtown Dallas, where hundreds were protesting police shootings that happened in other parts of the country earlier this week.

Four of the officers worked for Dallas Police; the fifth was identified as 43-year-old transit officer Brent Thompson, of Dallas Area Rapid Transit, or DART.

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