Confederate symbols | KERA News

Confederate symbols

Courtesy of Dallas ISD / Twitter

The Dallas school district is spending part of the summer break replacing the names of four campuses named for Confederate leaders.

The district tweeted photos Monday of new signs for the elementary schools updating their names: Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee, Albert Sidney Johnston and William L. Cabell.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

A new study from the Southern Poverty Law Center says Texas has removed 31 Confederate symbols over the last three years — more than any other state in the nation.

Just up Interstate 10, about 50 miles northwest of San Antonio, stands a monument in a small town that's unlike any monument in Texas.

    


Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

Dallas City Council remains undecided on what to do with a few existing Confederate landmarks.

In a meeting Wednesday, council members delayed a vote on whether to demolish the Confederate War Memorial at Pioneer Park Cemetery — and whether to remove the base where a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee once stood from Oak Lawn Park.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

A small group of Dallas faith leaders gathered beneath the Confederate war memorial in Pioneer Park Friday, demanding the city proceed with its original recommendation to remove the public monument.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

The Dallas City Council Wednesday continued its debate over what to do with the city's Confederate monuments.

No vote was taken in the briefing, but City Council will eventually have to sign off on some kind of plan to address them. Still, council members agreed the city needs to acknowledge its racial past and give a full picture of the city's history.

CameliaTWU / Flickr Creative Commons

Denton County commissioners have unanimously approved a plan to keep the Confederate statue located on the south side of the historic Courthouse on the Square lawn — with added historical context. 

Texas Employees Get Friday Off To Celebrate 'Confederate Heroes'

Jan 19, 2018
John Jordan for The Texas Tribune

Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday isn't the only holiday this week for state employees in Texas. They can also take off Friday for a state holiday that has been a source of controversy: Confederate Heroes Day.

Illustration by Krystina Martinez / KERA News

2017 was a rollercoaster year for news, especially if you were a person of color, a transgender person, an immigrant, or a woman.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

In light of the racial violence in Charlottesville, Virginia this past summer, the Dallas school board voted to change the names of four elementary schools named for Confederate generals: Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, William Cabell and Albert Sidney Johnston.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Latest on Confederate symbols in Dallas; Astros win the World Series; Trump nominates Dan Patrick’s son as U.S. attorney; and more. 

John Jordan / The Texas Tribune

A meeting between state Rep. Eric Johnson, D-Dallas, and Texas Gov. Greg Abbott over Confederate monuments on Capitol grounds ended with the governor expressing a desire to move forward with the removal of a controversial plaque from inside the Capitol, Johnson told The Texas Tribune.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT News

Five stories that have North Texas talking: The latest in Confederate symbols and Texas; George H.W. Bush under fire; classic scary movies; and more.

The Texas Tribune

Most Texas voters don’t want to remove Confederate memorials or put them in museums, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll.

Ocuish / Wikimedia Commons

As Dallas considers changes to monuments, streets and schools named for Confederate leaders, the city of Austin has joined a growing movement to change Columbus Day to Indigenous People Day. TCU History professor Jodi Campbell finds the debates constructive, but thinks it may be more valuable to look at the questions behind them.

Rick Holter / KERA News

The recent debates in Dallas, Denton and Fort Worth over Confederate monuments and places named for Confederate figures puts Cindy Harriman in a unique position. She’s the executive director of the Texas Civil War Museum – and a lifelong member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

It’s up to the Dallas City Council to decide the fate of the city’s Confederate symbols.

The council is expected to vote early next year; the city's Cultural Affairs Commission endorsed a series of recommendations this week made by a task force appointed by Mayor Mike Rawlings. Here's what those actions would do.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

A unanimous school board says Dallas Independent School District must change the names of four schools named for Confederate leaders: Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee, Albert Sidney Johnston and William L. Cabell elementary schools. 

The board will consider new names in February. Until then, the process of coming up with different names could be emotional — like it was at a recent meeting at Stonewall Jackson.

Hady Mawajdeh / KERA News

The recent removal of the Robert E. Lee statue at a park in Dallas has intensified a debate over whether Confederate statues and memorials should be taken down, moved to a museum or left alone.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

The Dallas Park Board voted Friday to temporarily revert Lee Park back to its original name: Oak Lawn Park.

John Jordan / The Texas Tribune

Texas House Speaker Joe Straus requested on Tuesday that a contentious Confederate plaque be removed from the Capitol.

CAROL M. HIGHSMITH / LIBRARY OF CONGRESS/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

After more than 80 years in the park in Dallas that bears his name, the city has removed a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.  A city task force will consider the future of other Confederate monuments, but commentator William Holston believes that's not enough to right past wrongs.

The "This Is Texas Freedom Force" gathered to oppose the removal of Robert E. Lee statue.
Hady Mawajdeh

Two days after a statue of Robert E. Lee was removed from the Dallas park named after him, a group called the “This Is Texas Freedom Force” held a protest rally at the empty pedestal Saturday morning.

From Texas Standard:

After weeks of legal and logistical wrangling, a statue of Confederate leader Robert E. Lee that had been in Dallas' Oak Lawn neighborhood for 81 years, was removed Thursday night. Meanwhile, State Rep. Eric Johnson (D-Dallas) will meet with Gov. Greg Abbott to discuss removing or altering Confederate monuments and plaques on the Capitol grounds.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

The statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and a young soldier on horseback in Oak Lawn was taken down Thursday. A crane and crews arrived at Lee Park in the afternoon to remove the statue, after several failed attempts in the past week.

An 81-year-old statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in Oak Lawn's Lee Park can now come down. 

During a hearing Thursday, U.S. District Judge Sidney Fitzwater ruled the statue's removal didn't violate First Amendment rights. He also said the Dallas City Council didn't break its own rules when it voted Wednesday to remove the statue.

Justin Martin / KERA News

Update, 3 p.m. Thursday: The restraining order was thrown out, allowing for the removal of the statue. Read more about the ruling here

A federal court on Wednesday afternoon temporarily halted the removal of the statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in Oak Lawn's Lee Park.

The temporary restraining order came hours after the Dallas City Council approved a resolution for the statue's immediate removal.

Carol M. Highsmith / Library of Congress/Wikimedia Commons

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Dallas has its task force on Confederate monuments; stay up to date with Hurricane Harvey; an old Fort Worth pasta factory gets new life; and more.

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

A Confederate heritage group sued the University of Texas at Austin on Thursday for removing several Confederate statues from its campus earlier this week.

A 25-year-old man was taken into custody Monday for attempting to destroy the General Dowling Monument located in Hermann Park, according to the office of Acting U.S. Attorney Abe Martinez.

A complaint was filed in Houston federal court today charging Andrew Schneck. 

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