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community college

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Technology continues to transform operating rooms, and community colleges in North Texas that train surgical technologists must evolve, too. 

U.S. Department of Education / Flickr

Earlier this summer, KERA reported on a new law that allows certain community colleges in Texas to offer four-year degrees in areas like nursing and early childhood education. Supporters say this will help fill shortages in those fields. But not everyone’s happy about the effort.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Texas is facing shortages in the workforce in fields like nursing and education. One solution: Lawmakers passed a bill this session allowing community colleges to offer bachelor’s degrees in certain fields. Gov. Greg Abbot signed the bill into law last month.

When Andrea Diaz was applying to colleges, she got good news and bad news. The good news was that American University, a private four-year university in Washington, D.C., wanted her. The bad news was that it required her to come to campus early to take two summer developmental-level courses in math and English.

"I was traumatized by it," Diaz says, "because I felt that they didn't see in me the potential to do well in college."

Ever since Alberto Perez was a kid growing up in Dove Springs, he knew he wanted to go to UT Austin.

“I remember telling my mom, pointing at the tower, saying, 'that’s where I’m going to go to school,'" Perez remembers.


Dianna Douglas / KERA News

North Lake College in Irving is home to hundreds of Nepali students, and they're feeling the impact of last week's earthquake.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Texas legislators are debating whether to repeal the Texas Dream Act. Signed by then-Governor Rick Perry in 2001, the law allows certain undocumented students to pay in-state tuition. A recent Texas Tribune analysis revealed that the majority of undocumented students who pay in-state tuition rates don't attend four-year universities – they’re in community colleges. And most are in school here in North Texas.

Bob Booth / Fort Worth Star-Telegram

In Fort Worth Thursday, State Sen. Leticia Van De Putte, the Democrat running for lieutenant governor, rolled out her plan to provide a free, two-year college education to all qualified high school graduates.