Commentaries | KERA News

Commentaries

KERA has refocused its approach to commentaries on the radio and the web. We aim to explore the issues of the day, but not in the type of pieces you’d routinely find on op-ed pages of newspapers. Instead, we do it through storytelling and personal experiences.  

Diversity is a primary goal – across politics, ethnicity, age, geography. KERA aims to sound more like North Texas, with a wide variety of voices covering a wide variety of topics.

Immediacy is key. When reflecting on a news event, the piece should be turned around within a couple of days. Airing more than a week after a news event is often too late. And, when a news event can be anticipated, we try to air the commentary the day of that event.

Brevity is crucial. The piece should not exceed three minutes. Read aloud and time the commentary before submitting it.

So is food for thought.  A good radio commentary gives the media consumer something to think about well after its presentation ends, not just the writer’s point of view.

Here are a few examples that fit the criteria:

How To Submit

Submit commentaries by email, with a suggested two-sentence host introduction and a one-sentence “tagline” for the host to read that describes the commentator (Ex: “Jane Doe is a writer from Dallas.”) Please include your complete contact information: email address, phone number, Twitter and Facebook handles.

Whom To Contact

Sam Baker, Senior Editor

Email: sbaker@kera.org | Phone: 214-740-9244 | Twitter: @srbkera

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Commentator Lee Cullum recently attended a conference in Berlin where the main topic was supposed to be the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership. But she says all anyone could think about were the migrants pouring into Germany from the Middle East. 

Commentary: Jimmy Who?

Sep 2, 2015
www.authentichistory.com

Recent news about his cancer has prompted numerous tributes to former President Jimmy Carter. Commentator Lee Cullum looks back to when she first met him.

Commentary: Continuing Education

Aug 25, 2015
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The start of a school year for many students means new beginnings. For the family of commentator Tom Dodge, call it a case of continuing education.

Commentary: Leaders Vs. Bosses

Jul 16, 2015
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Commentator William Holston recently turned 59 years old. During that time, he’s married, raised children and practiced law. Now, as head of the Human Rights Initiative of North Texas, Holston wants to focus on another goal: becoming a great leader.

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An obituary following his death June 20 called Daniel Weiser arguably the most powerful Dallas political figure who never sought elected office. Journalist Bob Ray Sanders explains in this commentary why voters in recent Dallas elections owe him a thank you.

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As we approach Mother’s Day, commentator Diane Brown looks back on her relationship with her mother-in-law. She said it was difficult at first, but time and understanding won out in the end.

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August 2015 will mark ten years since Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans. It’s been a difficult recovery with some problems still to work out. But commentator Lee Cullum says there’s good news to report.

Study Up For 'Think': The Hairy Truth Of Hair Removal

Feb 11, 2015
Daniel Horacio Agostini, flickr

Waxing, shaving, tweezing, threading, epilating, lasering ... while the methods vary, the vast majority of Americans have tried removing body hair they find unsightly. At noon, Krys Boyd will sit down with historian Rebecca Herzig, author of Plucked: A History of Hair Removal.

Wikimedia Commons

Texas has its own claim to the legacy of the American civil rights movement - James Farmer Jr.  Born in Marshall in 1920, Jan. 12 would have been the birthday of the man many remember as “the great debater.”

Dr. Ben Voth, director of forensics (speech & debate) at Southern Methodist University, says Farmer’s bipartisan civility has much to teach us today.

Study Up For 'Think': A Natural Fix For ADHD

Nov 20, 2014
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Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder affects eleven percent of kids ages 4-17. In the first hour of 'Think', we'll talk about the root causes of A.D.H.D. and a natural approach to treating the condition with Dr. Richard Friedman, who recently wrote an article in The New York Times about the disorder.

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