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Charlottesville

In what appeared to be a thinly veiled reference to politics in the Age of Trump, Sen. John McCain on Monday warned Americans against "half-baked, spurious nationalism," calling the abandonment of U.S. global leadership "unpatriotic."

Speaking in Philadelphia, where he was being honored with the Liberty Medal by the National Constitution Center, McCain did not mention the president by name, but his words appeared to be aimed at Trump and his administration.

CAROL M. HIGHSMITH / LIBRARY OF CONGRESS/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

After more than 80 years in the park in Dallas that bears his name, the city has removed a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.  A city task force will consider the future of other Confederate monuments, but commentator William Holston believes that's not enough to right past wrongs.

Updated at 9:23 p.m. ET

A day after meeting with Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., to discuss improving race relations, policy issues of specific concern to communities of color and Scott's pointed criticism of President Trump after his comments in response to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., Trump is standing by those remarks.

Miss America Pageant / ABC

Margana Wood, who represented Texas at the Miss America 2018 pageant, didn’t get the crown Sunday night in Atlantic City, but she was getting countless likes, retweets and shares by Monday morning.

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

A Confederate heritage group sued the University of Texas at Austin on Thursday for removing several Confederate statues from its campus earlier this week.

The United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination has urged the U.S. government to reject racist speech and ideology and criticized its "failure at the highest political level" to unequivocally condemn the racist violence in Charlottesville, Va., earlier this month.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

Thousands of protesters denounced white supremacy and called for the removal of Confederate monuments at a rally in downtown Dallas Saturday night — one week after protests over the same issues spurred violence in Charlottesville, Va.

Later, a separate, smaller demonstration at nearby Pioneer Plaza extended into the night.

Robin Jerstad for The Texas Tribune

Gov. Greg Abbott on Wednesday weighed in on the renewed debate over Confederate monuments in Texas, saying that removing them "won't erase our nation's past, and it doesn't advance our nation's future." 

Updated at 4:59 p.m. ET

President Trump stood by his heavily criticized defense of monuments commemorating the Confederacy in a series of tweets Thursday morning. Trump said removing the statues of Confederate generals meant removing "beauty" — that would "never able to be comparably replaced" — from American cities. As he did in a Tuesday press conference, he also attempted to equate some Confederate generals with some of the Founding Fathers.

Strung together, the tweets read:

A majority of Americans think President Trump's response to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., was "not strong enough," according to an NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

Fifty-two percent of respondents said so, as compared with just over a quarter (27 percent) who thought it was strong enough.

From Texas Standard:

President Donald Trump staged one of the most memorable press conferences in U.S. history Tuesday afternoon: a combative exchange about last weekend's violence in Charlottesville, Va. It was an opportunity to reinforce his heavily scripted message from Monday, condemning neo-Nazis and white supremacists. Instead, he went off script, reiterating talking points of the self-described “alt-right.”

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings wants to form a task force to discuss whether the city should remove its Confederate monuments.

Updated at 7:26 p.m. ET

In a stunning reversal from comments he made just one day prior, President Trump said on Tuesday "there's blame on both sides" for the violence in Charlottesville, Va.

A "White Lives Matter" rally scheduled at Texas A&M University for Sept. 11 has been called off over "risks of threat to life and safety," the school says.

The white nationalist rally, organized by former Texas A&M student Preston Wiginton, was not sponsored by any campus organizations, the university says. But the university, which is required to observe First Amendment rights, had allowed Wiginton to reserve space in a public area on campus.

Carol M. Highsmith / Library of Congress/Wikimedia Commons

Following the weekend violence from a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., there are renewed calls for North Texas cities to remove their Confederate monuments and for school districts to rename schools that honor Confederate leaders.

Matthew Watkins / Texas Tribune

Saying they’re concerned about student safety, Texas A&M University leaders announced Monday that they have canceled a planned white nationalist rally on campus.

Texas House Calls On Texas A&M Chancellor To Halt White Nationalist Rally

Aug 14, 2017
Marjorie Kamys Cotera / The Texas Tribune

After a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, turned violent over the weekend, Texas House members on Monday called upon the chancellor of the Texas A&M University System to stop a planned "White Lives Matter" rally from taking place on the College Station campus.

At the center of Charlottesville's violent white nationalist rally was a long-simmering controversy over the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

Almost 48 hours after violence engulfed Charlottesville, Va., President Trump called out white nationalist groups by name. Trump's remarks on Monday followed criticism that his initial statement about the clash of protesters did not condemn racist groups specifically.

Updated at 2:30 a.m. ET Tuesday
By the end of the day on Monday, three CEOs had announced they were leaving President Trump's American Manufacturing Council. Merck CEO Kenneth Frazier was the first to announce his resignation followed by Under Armour's Kevin Plank and Intel's Brian Krzanich.

The resignations came after Trump was criticized for his response to the violence at white supremacist events in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend. The president, famous for his ability to be direct and forceful, was faulted for condemning violence "on many sides."

One day after deadly unrest roiled Charlottesville, Va., its effects have sent ripples through cities across the United States. Demonstrators from New York City to Seattle organized rallies Sunday to condemn the white nationalist groups that had descended on the Virginia city this weekend.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET

A day after a rally of white nationalists turned violent in Charlottesville, Va., Gov. Terry McAuliffe said there is "no place" for such hateful people in the United States as he called on President Trump to more strongly condemn the perpetrators.

Justin Ide / Reuters

After a rally by white nationalists turned violent in Charlottesville, Virginia on Saturday, President Trump responded by saying: "We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides, on many sides."

Updated at 7:52 p.m. ET

A man who appeared to be protesting Saturday with a group of self-proclaimed fascists is accused of killing a woman and injuring multiple others by driving his car into a crowd of marchers in Charlottesville, Va.

Updated Aug. 13 at 10:50 a.m. ET

Political leaders used Twitter to respond to the violent confrontations that began Friday night in Charlottesville, Va.; continued with a "Unite the Right" rally that pitted members of the alt-right, Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazi groups against anti-racism counterprotesters on Saturday; and turned deadly when a car plowed into a group of pedestrians.

Updated Aug. 12 at 10:04 p.m. ET

Three people died and about 35 were injured in a day of violence that began with clashes at a white nationalist rally on Saturday in Charlottesville, Va., Gov. Terry McAuliffe said.

One of those killed was a 32-year-old female pedestrian who was hit by a car that plowed into marchers, authorities said. The driver of the car, James Alex Fields is being held on charges including second degree murder. Police say he's from Ohio.