Zip Lines, Bunker Condos Planned For New 'Doomsday' Development In Ector, Texas | KERA News

Zip Lines, Bunker Condos Planned For New 'Doomsday' Development In Ector, Texas

Nov 14, 2016

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Anti-Trump action in Dallas continues with sixth straight day of protests planned; Mark Cuban reinstated two journalists’ Mavericks media credentials after revoking them; Houston’s homeless believe they were pushed out recently in time for the Super Bowl; and more.

A new housing community in Ector, Texas will be outfitted for a full round of golf, a day at the beach and maybe, the end of the world. Near the Oklahoma border, the 700-acre Trident Lakes community will house 400 condos built 90 percent underground, off-the-grid energy resources and possibly a DNA vault, protecting some 1,600 residents if a doomsday scenario were to play out, The Associated Press reports.

James O'Connor, CEO of Dallas-based Vintuary Holdings, which represents the group of investors backing the $300 million project, tells the AP:

 

"The initial perception is that it's defined as a doomsday scenario. I'm trying to change the perception to a long-term sustainable community, with the concept of a 200-year community. We're not looking at just putting all our residents underground; we're looking to put together a beautiful place to live that's also secure."

Part of building a sustainable community means “residents are wanted with a varied skill set so that in the aftermath of a disaster everyone can contribute with the recovery,” the AP reports. O'Connor says that “well known celebrities and professional athletes have expressed an interest because of the privacy and security it will offer.” Move-in day is expected in 2018. Read more. [The Associated Press, The Houston Chronicle]

  • Demonstrators turned out Sunday in Dallas for the fifth straight day of anti-Trump protests. Sunday’s “mini-march” was smaller in comparison to the gatherings of about 250-400 people at rallies Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at Dallas' AT&T Plaza. Dealey Plaza and Main Street Garden, respectively, The Dallas Morning News reports. During Thursday’s event two people were arrested for marching in the street and another for methamphetamine possession and having a gun illegally. Otherwise, the protests have been peaceful. Another rally organized by the Next Generation Action Network is planned at 7 p.m. in Main Street Garden. [The Dallas Morning News]
  • If Trump carries out his border security plan, Texas might spend less state tax money. In 2015, lawmakers devoted $800 million in the state budget to increase border security. Republican state Rep. Dennis Bonnen, author of the border security package, said he wants Texas to keep a strong presence along the boundary until lawmakers see what concrete steps are taken in Washington, The Texas Tribune reports. However, the cornerstone of Trump’s security plan — a physical wall — won’t be feasible along several parts of the border, Charles Perry, R-Lubbock, says. [The Texas Tribune]

 

  • Dozens of homeless people in Houston believe they’re being kicked out of their camp to make way for the upcoming Super Bowl. People who frequented an area under highway U.S. 59 in midtown Houston between downtown and NRG Stadium believe the Feb. 5 game is the reason police officers showed up early last week and warned them it was time go, according to the Houston Chronicle. The Associated Press reports, “the area was an active site for users and dealers of synthetic marijuana, and many of those cleared from the area didn't live there.” [The Houston Chronicle, AP]

 

  • Mavericks owner Mark Cuban restored media credentials for two EPSN journalists. Cuban said Monday that he banned Marc Stein and Tim MacMahon from home games to bring attention to the issue of companies using automation in sports coverage, The Associated Press reports. ESPN President John Skipper said the network "has never contemplated automated reporting in our NBA coverage" and said the network will now link to team sites in game recaps while still using content from the AP "when we are not in the building." [The Associated Press]