Supreme Court Rulings Hailed By Gay Rights Advocates | KERA News

Supreme Court Rulings Hailed By Gay Rights Advocates

Jun 26, 2013

Supporters of gay marriage celebrated the Supreme Court's decisions in two cases on Wednesday.
Credit Steve Rhodes / Flickr

Update, 12:40 p.m.:  In Dallas, some gay rights advocates called the Supreme Court's ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act a partial victory because states like Texas do not recognize same-sex marriages. However, Texas couples who were married in other states will now be eligible for federal benefits.

"While the SCOTUS ruled against federal discrimination, they left state discrimination in place," Lynn Walters, Executive Director of Hope for Peace and Justice, said in a press release. "While it is a partial victory, it means that far too many same gender couples will continue to suffer discrimination in a state like Texas."

 

Leaders of Cathedral of Hope church in Dallas, which has been performing services for same-sex couples for more than 40 years, said they were thankful for the court's decision. They also hoped that states that don't allow gay marriage would ultimately "rescind their unfair laws."  

Original post: The Supreme Court’s decision in two cases this morning is being seen as a major victory for the gay rights movement.

First, it ruled that the Defense of Marriage Act was unconstitutional.  In the 5-4 decision, the court struck down a part of the act that denies federal benefits to married same-sex couples. The ruling paves the way for those couples to take advantage of more than 1,100 benefits currently granted to heterosexual couples, including tax breaks.

In the second decision, the court voted 5-4 again that it didn’t have jurisdiction to hear the California Proposition 8 case. That proposition bans same-sex marriages in the state of California. The decision means gay couples there will be able to get married again.

In Dallas, some gay rights advocates called the court's ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act a partial victory because states like Texas do not recognize same-sex marriages. However, Texas couples who were married in other states will now be eligible for federal benefits.

"While the SCOTUS ruled against federal discrimination, they left state discrimination in place," Lynn Walters, Executive Director of Hope for Peace and Justice, said in a press release. "While it is a partial victory, it means that far too many same gender couples will continue to suffer discrimination in a state like Texas."

Leaders of Cathedral of Hope church in Dallas, which has been performing services for same-sex couples for more than 40 years, said they were thankful for the court's decision. They also hoped that states that don't allow gay marriage would ultimately "rescind their unfair laws."  

What do you make of today's decisions? We're looking for people on both sides of the issue to interview. If you'd like to comment, contact us on the KERA News Facebook page.