Stephanie Kuo | KERA News

Stephanie Kuo

Adminstrative Producer, Reporter

Stephanie Kuo is an award-winning radio journalist currently working as a reporter and administrative producer at KERA, overseeing and coordinating editorial content reports and logistics for the Texas Station Collaborative – a statewide news consortium including KERA, KUT in Austin, Houston Public Media and Texas Public Radio in San Antonio.

Stephanie’s reporting focuses on the intersection of poverty, homelessness and urban development. She's won awards from the New York State Associated Press Broadcasters Association, the Texas Associated Press Broadcasters Association and the Public Radio News Directors Inc.

Stephanie received a Master of Science from Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, in its radio program, and a bachelor's in journalism from the University of Texas at Austin. Before coming to KERA in 2014, she spent three years in New York, working as an editor and producer at WFUV in the Bronx, and reporting on urban issues, like hunger, homelessness and the impacts of gentrification. Stephanie is originally from Plano, Texas.

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Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

The sun is just creeping over the horizon on a hot July day. It’s only about 80 degrees, but everyone is already drenched in sweat because they’ve been packing and hauling dozens of 40-pound plastic tubs full of food onto a fleet of white vans.

Cody Duty / AP

The top local stories this evening from KERA News:

A wildfire in Palo Pinto County, about 60 miles west of Fort Worth, has been growing throughout the day – and it's only about 10 percent contained.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

A group of Dallas renters in the Vickery Meadow neighborhood have gotten some good news: After they spoke up, the Dallas school district agreed to pay them four times as much money as originally offered to help them move out. The district plans to tear down their apartment complex and build a school there.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

In 2015, Parkland Hospital in Dallas became the first major hospital system in the country to screen each and every one of its patients for suicide risk — at each and every visit. In March, the hospital extended those screenings to children as young as 10.

Allison V. Smith / KERA news special contributor

Dallas’ first comprehensive housing policy, approved last week, is designed to encourage more affordable housing and disrupt patterns of segregation and gentrification. However, the policy has its critics.

Courtesy of Parkland Hospital

At last month’s State of the Homeless address, Cindy Crain, the outgoing president and CEO of the Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance, confirmed one of the demographic trends that has worried her the most: The homeless in Dallas are getting older and sicker.

Lara Solt / KERA News special contributor

In years past, the Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance and its partners set up outposts hoping homeless youth would come to them. This year, they decided that process needed to be reversed.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

The president and CEO of the Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance has resigned – effective at the end of this month. Cindy Crain joined the nonprofit in 2015, and her departure comes amid months of growing tension between the homeless alliance and Dallas City Hall.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

The North Park Terrace Apartments in Vickery Meadow has been a bit of a ghost town for the past few months. Tenants of the 300-unit complex began moving out in October when they were told that the Dallas Independent School District had purchased the property as part of a 2015 bond package and would be building a new elementary school.

Courtesy of the Texas Health and Human Services Commission

A left-leaning grassroots organization called the East Dallas Persistent Women released a report last week finding that Healthy Texas Women — a state program intended to provide low-cost women’s health services — is riddled with errors on its website.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

A small group of Dallas faith leaders gathered beneath the Confederate war memorial in Pioneer Park Friday, demanding the city proceed with its original recommendation to remove the public monument.

Courtesy of MYRICK, GUROSKY & ASSOCIATES - NAMB

The top local stories this morning from KERA News:

First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs will build a new sanctuary and community center. The announcement by church officials Tuesday night comes nearly five months after a gunman killed more than two dozen people during a Sunday church service last November.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

The number of people sleeping on the streets across parts of North Texas continues to grow, according to the results of the annual homeless "point-in-time" count, which took place in January.

TCU Basketball / Twitter

The top local stories this morning:

After 20 years, Texas Christian University is finally headed back to the NCAA basketball tournament.

Courtesy of UNT Health Science Center

Advancements in medicine have helped improve the overall health of Americans over the past several decades, but they haven’t benefited everyone.

Richardson Police Department / Twitter

The top local stories this morning from KERA News:

Funeral services for a Richardson Police officer killed in the line of duty are set for this afternoon. David Sherrard will be honored at 2 p.m. at Watermark Community Church in Dallas.

City of Fort Worth

The top local stories this morning from KERA News:

Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price will join President Donald Trump today at the White House when he releases details of his long-awaited $1.5 trillion plan to improve the nation's infrastructure.

Texas Central Partners

The folks behind the proposed Texas bullet train, which aims to shuttle travelers 200 miles per hour between Dallas and Houston in 90 minutes, have released unofficial designs of the North Texas station.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

On Thursday, hundreds of volunteers will descend onto Dallas and Collin County streets to count the number of people sleeping outside as part of the annual homeless “point-in-time” count, organized by the Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance

Martin do Nascimento / KUT News

The top local stories this evening from KERA News:

Members of Congress are still trying to reach an agreement on an Obama-era immigration program that protects young people, who came to the U.S. illegally as children, from deportation.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

Flu season has been especially severe this year in North Texas. Earlier this month, the Walgreens flu index ranked Dallas-Fort Worth the seventh most active metropolitan area in the country, prompting area hospitals to push flu prevention more than usual.

But those reminders can often miss the most vulnerable in the community – so a roving flu clinic in Fort Worth is closing the gap.

Shutterstock

The top local stories this evening from KERA News:

The number of Texans dying from a flu-related cause has now doubled over the past two weeks. In the most active flu season in recent years, 2,355 Texans have died from flu-related causes – with 60 deaths in North Texas alone.

Shutterstock

The top local stories this morning from KERA News:

The National Weather Service says a winter storm system sweeping across the state will move out of North Texas this morning.

Courtesy of Gardere Wynne Sewell LLP

The top local stories this morning from KERA News:

Since 1993, fourth and fifth graders across Dallas have written and performed speeches inspired by civil rights leader Dr. King at the Gardere Martin Luther King Junior Oratory Competition.

This year, students answered the question: “What is your dream for today’s world?”

garryknight / Flickr

In a scathing report released last week, a Dallas auditor criticized the city’s response to its growing homeless problem, saying city officials have done a poor job keeping track of the agencies that are tasked with helping the homeless.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

Once a year, the Dallas Association of Young Lawyers and The Stewpot downtown host “community court.” It’s an opportunity for homeless people to trade in tickets for community service, tickets issued for riding DART trains and buses without paying, for jaywalking — relatively minor offenses.

Shutterstock

Think about quintessential Texas cuisine. What comes to mind? Barbecue? Chili? Tex-Mex? How about chicken fried steak? Its roots are fuzzy, but most food historians agree, this iconic dish was born and bred in the Lone Star State.

Oct. 26 is Chicken Fried Steak Day in Texas – an official state holiday created in 2011 thanks to a pair of passionate Dallasites.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

This is not a ghost story.  But it’s a story about the ghost of a dream – a French dream – to build a colony for Frenchmen fleeing political and economic upheaval that began in Paris and swept across Europe in the late 1840s.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

HIV is no longer considered a death sentence in the United States, and people living with HIV are living longer. That’s largely thanks to antiretroviral drugs, which were first introduced 30 years ago.

As the earliest survivors are growing older, though, doctors are discovering new health challenges related to HIV.

Courtesy of the Dallas Zoo

For the past few years, the Dallas Zoo has been trying to get an accurate blood pressure reading for their gorillas – without having to put them to sleep.

It’s part of a national effort across several accredited zoos to better understand cardiovascular health in apes to prevent heart disease in captivity.

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