Stella M. Chávez

Reporter/Blogger

Stella Chávez is KERA’s education reporter/blogger. Her journalism roots run deep: She spent a decade and a half in newspapers – including seven years at The Dallas Morning News, where she covered education and won the Livingston Award for National Reporting, which is given annually to the best journalists across the country under age 35. The award-winning entry was  “Yolanda’s Crossing,” a seven-part DMN series she co-wrote that reconstructs the 5,000-mile journey of a young Mexican sexual-abuse victim from a small Oaxacan village to Dallas. For the last two years, she worked for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, where she was part of the agency’s outreach efforts on the Affordable Care Act and ran the regional office’s social media efforts.

Ways to Connect

This week, in an American Graduate series called “The First Week,” we’ve been listening to conversations about race after a summer of racial turmoil in America and police shootings in Dallas. We’ve heard from parents, students and a teacher. And now, a school resource officer who’s building relationships at a high school in the Carrollton-Farmers Branch School District.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Over the next five days, in a series called "The First Week," we’ll listen in on the conversations students, parents, educators and police officers are having after a summer of racial turmoil in the U.S. and police shootings in Dallas. First, we look at race through the perspective of a black family in Arlington.

Ken Bennett / Wake Forest University School of Law

Two North Texas universities recently decided to no longer enroll new students in their evening law school programs.

UNT Dallas

The UNT Dallas law school program is in jeopardy of not receiving accreditation from the American Bar Association. 

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Around the country, it’s been challenging for law school graduates to find jobs as lawyers. As a result, law school enrollment has gone down in some places. That’s not deterring one North Texas school. The UNT Dallas College of Law is trying to attract a different type of student.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

In the days since a gunman shot and killed five police officers in downtown Dallas, group after group has called for a new kind of conversation about police and race relations.

KC Ivey / flickr

A federal appeals court ruled on Wednesday that the Texas Voter ID Law violates the Voting Rights Act. The lawsuit challenging the law was born in North Texas.

Patrick Zamarripa's photo via Facebook

One of the five police officers killed in the July 7 downtown Dallas shooting was laid to rest at Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery on Saturday. As part of KERA’s series, “Remembering the Fallen,” we look at the life of 32-year-old Dallas Officer Patricio "Patrick" Zamarripa.

Javier Giribet-Vargas / KERA News Special Contributor

More than 1,000 people gathered for a candlelight vigil in downtown Dallas Monday night to remember the five officers who died during last week's shootings.

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

Police have identified the shooter as Micah Xavier Johnson, a 25-year-old Army veteran who lived in Mesquite. On Friday, Dallas Police Chief David Brown said Johnson was upset about recent police shootings. KERA visited Johnson’s neighborhood and spoke to neighbors there.

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