Shelley Kofler

News Director/Texas Public Radio

Shelley Kofler is Texas Public Radio’s news director. She joined the organization in December 2014. Prior to TPR, she served as the managing editor and news director at KERA in Dallas-Fort Worth, and the Austin bureau chief and legislative reporter for North Texas ABC affiliate WFAA-TV.

Her expertise on legislative policy issues includes school finance, foster care and transportation. Her stories on the overmedication of foster children captured the attention of state officials who strengthened laws for the use of psychotropic drugs.

Shelley also covered government issues for North Texas NBC affiliate KXAS-TV and worked with KERA on numerous public affairs projects, including nationally broadcast programs. She has reported on statewide elections and presidential primaries since the late 1980s. She also founded and operated her own communications firm, Kofler Communications, in Dallas and Austin. She served as a communications strategist and media trainer for various companies, agencies and public officials.

Shelley’s radio and television work has been honored by the Texas Associated Press Broadcasters Association, the Houston Press Club, and the Radio-Television Digital News Association, from whom she received a prestigious Edward R. Murrow Award for a series of reports on the Trinity toll road decision.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

The city of Dallas and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development have settled a complaint that involved the city’s use of incentives for locating low-income housing.

Dallas city officials say they have resolved a federal fair housing discrimination case.

Shutterstock

Tuesday's Republican sweep added a new layer of conservatism to state government in Texas.

KERA’s Shelley Kofler talked with Ross Ramsey with The Texas Tribune about how that might play out at the Texas Legislature.

Greg Abbott and Wendy Davis campaigns / KERA

For months, the candidates for Texas governor have sparred, debated, and tried to sell themselves to voters.  Tuesday night, Democrat Wendy Davis and Republican Greg Abbott will find out who will lead this state.

If recent trends holds true, more Texas women than men will vote in tomorrow’s election. That’s one reason the candidates for governor have appealed directly to women. 

Shelley Kofler / KERA

Once again, the battle over a state senate seat in Tarrant County is the most closely watched legislative race in Texas.  

LM Otero / Associated Press

In the past month, Texas voters have seen a lot of Leticia Van de Putte, the Democrat running for lieutenant governor. But they haven't seen nearly as much of her Republican opponent, Dan Patrick. 

Jennifer Whitney/Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

The education issue has taken center stage in the race for lieutenant governor as the two state senators duke it out on the airwaves. 

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Texas is facing drought and a booming population. There's a unique project in North Texas that hopes to meet the state's growing thirst for water: A wetland. Wastewater flows through the wetland, where plants clean the water.

City of Arlington

In addition to the many candidates on the Nov. 4 ballot, Texans are voting on a constitutional amendment known as Proposition 1. If it passes, a portion of oil and gas tax money flowing into the state’s rainy day savings account will be used for transportation.

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