Lauren Silverman

Reporter/Blogger

Lauren Silverman is the Health, Science and Technology reporter/blogger for KERA News. Before joining KERA, she worked at NPR’s Weekend All Things Considered in Washington D.C. Lauren produced national stories on everything from the politics of climate change to the future of online education, including a piece on neighborhood farms in Compton, Cal., that won a National Association of Black Journalism’s ‘Salute to Excellence Award.’

As a freelance reporter, Lauren has written and recorded stories in English and Spanish for a variety of news outlets, including American Public Media’s Marketplace, NPR’s Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Latino USA.

Ways to Connect

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Meet the newest weapon in the Dallas police arsenal: the sponge gun. It launches a hardened foam projectile and gives officers an alternative to shooting a gun with bullets. 

You've probably heard of the credentials M.D. and R.N., and maybe N.P. The people using those letters are doctors, registered nurses and nurse practitioners. But what about PSC.D or D.PSc? Those letters refer to someone who practices pastoral medicine — or "Bible-based" health care.

If you want to see a doctor and don’t have health insurance, you might want to head to the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center on Saturday -- it's hosting a health clinic for adults and kids. 

Illustration/Molly Evans / KERA News

You’ve probably heard of the credentials M.D. and Ph.D. -- maybe RN or NP. How about PSc.D. or D.PSc.? Those letters signify someone practices pastoral medicine -- some call themselves doctors of pastoral medicine.

Gus Contreras / KERA News

Texas used to be considered an easy grab for U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz. And while the state’s delegates are definitely not out of reach on Tuesday, there are some primary voters slipping through his fingers. 

People in Texas are significantly more likely than adults nationwide to report that it has gotten harder to see a doctor in the past two years.

The finding comes from polling done by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Vera Brown has been stuck aboard the doctor merry-go-round for years now, trying to find an orthopedic surgeon who accepts her insurance. She doesn't find the seemingly endless calls, questions or repetition amusing.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

People in Texas are significantly more likely than adults nationwide to report that it has gotten harder to see a doctor in the past two years. That’s one finding in a new poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

In 2012, Ted Cruz made history when he beat incumbent Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst for a seat in the U.S. Senate. In his first campaign, he pulled together a large dose of Tea Party anger and a little bit of evangelical power. As his presidential campaign focuses on Monday’s Iowa caucuses, he’s added a few new emotional ingredients to the mix.

Ray's Sporting Goods in Dallas' Oak Cliff is a neighborhood firearm dreamland.

It's stocked with the latest pistols, shotguns and AR-15 military-style rifles. Chuck Payne, the store's manager, says he has sold to a lot more women recently.

"A lot of married ladies with their husbands, some without, but they've decided that their husband's not home, they need to be able to do something and they need a different gun than what their husband had," Payne says.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

It’s been a few weeks since the open carry law took effect in Texas. But many women still prefer to keep their guns concealed – and there is a growing accessory industry to feed their gun fashion needs.

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