Krystina Martinez | KERA News

Krystina Martinez

Assistant Producer

Krystina Martinez is an assistant producer at KERA. She wakes up bright and early to produce local content for Morning Edition and KERANews.org. She also produces The Friday Conversation, a weekly series of conversations with North Texas newsmakers. 

The Association of Independents in Radio (AIR) named Krystina a New Voices scholar in 2016, which is awarded to early career talent shaping the future of public media. Krystina first joined KERA as a freelancer in 2013. She produced for Morning EditionAll Things Considered and Think, contributed stories, produced Ebola coverage and served as the local producer for StoryCorps’ North Texas visit in 2014. Prior to KERA, she interned at NPR’s Weekend Edition in Washington, D.C.

A North Texas native, Krystina is a graduate of West Texas A&M University. Say hello @ThisIsKrystina.

Ways to Connect

Want to get clued into the region's most interesting stories in less than 10 minutes? KERA 90.1 FM has launched a twice-a-day local news segment from the KERA newsroom. The 10-minute segments air weekdays at 8:20 a.m. and 6:20 p.m. Click below to listen to Monday evening’s edition, which includes a look at winter weather affecting Thanksgiving air travel, the new superintendent for Irving ISD, and how new cholesterol guidelines are turning the focus to statin drugs.

BJ Austin / KERA News

Doctors Robert McClelland and Charles Baxter were part of the Parkland Hospital team that tried to save President John Kennedy. Earlier this year, McClelland talked at a conference about how the two witnessed the president’s last rites.

The two doctors were with the body in Trauma Room 1 when a priest arrived.  The position of the gurney made it impossible to leave without disturbing the priest. So, McClelland says, they stood "frozen" by the wall.

Tom Orr was just a kid when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. After witnessing Jack Ruby gun down Lee Harvey Oswald on television, Orr was surprised at how the assassination came to affect him.

Eighth graders at Kennedy-Curry Middle School in Dallas entered an essay contest about the legacy of John F. Kennedy. The winners were announced Wednesday. Here's the winning essay, written by Teriana Ward:

The Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture

Larry Allums was a freshman at Auburn University in Alabama when he heard the news of President Kennedy's assassination. Coming from the Deep South, Allums has had to come to terms with the tumultuous social climate as well as the traditionalist views of his parents in a time where neutrality wasn't an option.

Dr. Catalina Garcia isn't a Dallas native, but she fell in love with the city when she came for medical school. She learned about President Kennedy's assassination from a patient. She didn't pay much attention to politics at the time, but she learned quickly of the simmering tensions in Dallas.

Want to get clued into the region's most interesting stories in less than 10 minutes? KERA 90.1 FM has launched a twice-a-day local news segment from the KERA newsroom. The 10-minute segments air weekdays at 8:20 a.m. and 6:20 p.m. Click below to listen to Tuesday evening's edition, which includes a feature on the North Texas writers who are taking on the NaNoWriMo challenge. Also, famed architect Renzo Piano chats about his latest creation: the Piano Pavilion. We look to the skies later this month for what’s been dubbed the “Comet of the Year”, and we’ll hear from a North Texan who met and mourned President Kennedy – all in one day. 

BJ Austin / KERA News

The government shutdown generated national headlines, but it affected Dallas-Fort Worth and the rest of Texas, too. Initially, about 800,000 federal workers were forced off the job. On Oct. 16, Congress approved a bill to end the 16-day shutdown and avert the first government default in U.S. history Here’s the latest:

Update, 10:23 a.m. Fri., Oct. 25: The government has been open for more than a week, but some federal workers in Dallas-Fort Worth are suffering from "wounded morale, disillusionment and uncertainty about the stability of once highly sought after government jobs," The Dallas Morning News reports. Experienced government lawyers are looking for new jobs -- and employees worry about future paychecks.

Garann / Flickr

The wedding ceremony is steeped in ritual: the vows, the rings, the cake and, of course, the dress. What does that formula tell us about our culture? At noon on ‘Think,’ we’ll explore what weddings say about us with Karen M. Dunak, author of As Long As We Both Shall Love: The White Wedding in Postwar America .

Check out this twist on the traditional wedding act of the bouquet toss, made possible with Photoshop. Note: No cats were actually harmed.

The Texas Tribune

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst calls for President Obama’s impeachment, closing arguments in Mark Cuban’s insider-trading case, an early flu death and more.

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