Justin Martin

All Things Considered Host

Justin Martin is KERA’s local host of All Things Considered, anchoring afternoon newscasts for KERA 90.1 & KXT 91.7. Justin is also responsible for editing and publishing online news content for KERA, and can be heard in various KERA radio and TV productions.

Justin grew up in Mannheim, Germany, and avidly listened to the Voice of America and National Public Radio whenever stateside. He graduated from the American Broadcasting School, and further polished his skills with radio veteran Kris Anderson of the Mighty 690 fame, a 50,000 watt border-blaster operating out of Tijuana, Mexico. Justin has worked as holiday anchor for the USA Radio Network, serving the U.S. Armed Forces Network. He’s also hosted, produced, and engineered several shows, including the Southern Gospel Jubilee on 660 KSKY.

Justin lives in Dallas with his pets and lovingly cultivates his addiction to coffee, classic video games, and all things technology.

Ways To Connect

Amanda Siegfried / UT Dallas

Carbon nanotubes are a kind of material that might be used for everything from reinforcing muscles to conducting electricity. A new variant of the substance created at the University of Texas at Dallas could unlock a future of bendable technology. Ray Baughman runs the NanoTech Institute at UT Dallas

John Hartman, Univ. of Kentucky, Bugwood.org

Prized rosebushes in North Texas are at risk from an infection called ‘Rose Rosette.’ The disease is incurable and has already cost Southlake about a half-million dollars. Steve Huddleston is the senior horticulturist for the Fort Worth Botanic Garden and he joins KERA's Justin Martin for a look into ‘Rose Rosette.’

Brittney Tatchell / Smithsonian Institution

Nearly two decades after an ancient skeleton was discovered in Kennewick, Washington, scientists finally have a better idea about its hotly-debated origins. SMU anthropologist David Meltzer co-authored a recent study into what’s been dubbed the Kennewick Man. 

Brett Chisum / Flickr.com

Look up into the night sky this holiday weekend and you'll certainly see some fireworks, but what goes into making these colorful displays? Amy Walker is a professor with the University of Texas at Dallas. She has her Ph.D. in chemistry, so she knows a thing or two about the science behind the boom.

Bal Joshi

When the first earthquake hit Nepal in late April, the impact reached all the way to North Texas. Worried Nepalese-Americans checked in with friends and family. They organized relief efforts. A second earthquake struck a couple of weeks ago.

jbparrott / Flickr

A new report predicts a future of extreme weather wreaking havoc on the roads and runways in North Texas. 

Marco Antonio / WNYC

KERA and the AT&T Performing Arts Center are co-producing a summer speaker series called #thinkspeak, which features some public radio heroes. The host and producer of Radiolab will kick off the first of four events this week.

Brett Levin / (cc) Flickr

The top stories this evening from the KERA Newsroom: The Texas Senate has approved a limited medical marijuana bill.

Dallas Zoo

If you’re ever bitten by a venomous snake, your local hospital can probably take care of you. But if an exotic snake bites you, chances are a hurried phone call will be made to the Dallas Zoo. It has one of the country’s largest supplies of anti-venom.

CERN

A device as complicated as the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland is bound to have a few technical hiccups. A short circuit stalled its reboot – and scientists aren’t exactly sure when it’ll be fixed. 

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