Justin Martin | KERA News

Justin Martin

All Things Considered Host

Justin Martin is KERA’s local host of All Things Considered, anchoring afternoon newscasts for KERA 90.1 & KXT 91.7. 

Justin grew up in Mannheim, Germany, and avidly listened to the Voice of America and National Public Radio whenever stateside. He graduated from the American Broadcasting School, and further polished his skills with radio veteran Kris Anderson of the Mighty 690 fame, a 50,000 watt border-blaster operating out of Tijuana, Mexico. Justin has worked as holiday anchor for the USA Radio Network, serving the U.S. Armed Forces Network. He’s also hosted, produced, and engineered several shows, including the Southern Gospel Jubilee on 660 KSKY.

Justin lives in Dallas with his pets and lovingly cultivates his addiction to coffee, classic video games, and all things technology.

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Courtesty SMU, UCLA

A new study from Southern Methodist University shows that empathetic people — those who are generally more sensitive to the feelings of others — receive more pleasure from listening to music, and their brains show increased activity in areas associated with social interactions.

Courtesy of Drive.ai

One of the nation's first self-driving car services will be coming to North Texas next month. 

The top local stories this evening from KERA News:

Dallas-based AT&T will get a big piece of news about its future Tuesday: A federal judge is expected to decide whether it can buy Time Warner. The U.S. Justice Department sued to stop the merger last year. 

UNT Health Science Center

Studies suggest that Mexican-Americans have an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. They're about 1.5 times more likely to develop the disease than non-Hispanic white Americans.

Researchers at the UNT Health Science Center in Fort Worth are trying to find out why.

About every five years, Congress reconsiders the farm bill. The package deals with most affairs regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The bill also funds the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP) — what used to be called “food stamps.” 

Millions of Texans depend on SNAP to help buy food every month, and recent attempts by the U.S. House to change the program didn't work because the bill lacked votes. The Senate, however, is expected to release its own version of a farm bill this June.

UT Southwestern

We're learning more about depression and its impact on our daily lives, but there's still a long way to go when it comes to understanding how it affects teenagers, specifically.

Dr. Madhukar Trivedi with UT Southwestern Medical Center is leading a program in North Texas schools as part of long-term research to identify, study and treat teenagers with or at risk for depression.

Shutterstock

You may think of pain as just pain. How you experience that pain, though, might depend on whether you're a man or a woman.

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Since the recession of 2008, and the housing market crash, fewer Americans are able to purchase a home. And a new report from The Pew Charitable Trusts finds that since then, many families have become "rent burdened" and struggle to pay the bills. 

Brandon Wade / Fort Worth Star-Telegram

North Texas seems to be a prime place for dinosaur discovery, with numerous fossils spotted through the years by professional paleontologists and avid collectors alike. Among the most recent finds: a prehistoric crocodile that apparently liked to eat dinosaurs.

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Dallas is warming at a faster rate than any other large city in the country, besides Louisville, Kentucky and Phoenix, according to research conducted for the Texas Trees Foundation.

Courtesy of UT Dallas

Along with our basic needs for nutrition, how we feel can play a role in what we choose to eat and how much we eat. A new study from the University of Texas at Dallas examines the reasons behind "emotional eating" with a focus on kids and how dietary habits develop in early childhood. 

Fredrik Broden / The Original Doug's Gym Facebook

After more than a half-century of whipping people into shape, a legendary Dallas gym closed down this past weekend.

Doug's Gym in downtown has been in operation for 55 years, after owner Doug Eidd came to Dallas from Corpus Christi in the fall of 1962. 

Centers For Disease Control

Hospitals in Texas and across the country are doing a better job these days in stopping the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in health care settings.

But according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, these so-called "superbugs" still kill up to 23,000 people a year.

bakdc / Shutterstock

This weekend, students will be marching in Dallas and across the country, calling for new laws to reduce gun violence.

Criminologist Nadine Connell is leading a research team that's trying to get a better grasp on how guns have affected K-12 schools. The University of Texas at Dallas researchers are creating a database of all school shootings in America since 1990.

Congressman Joe Barton Facebook page / Facebook

We've all made mistakes — it's a part of being human. Apologizing for those mistakes is part of being human, too, but it's not always easy.

We've seen an avalanche of apologies and pseudo-apologies made in the last few months — think Harvey Weinstein or Al Franken or, closer to home, Congressman Joe Barton

SMU

Minecraft is a popular video game that's sort of like virtual Lego. Players find and build stuff by themselves, or online with friends.

It's a simple formula that's attracted millions of fans — and Southern Methodist University professors.

Shutterstock

The debate over government access to personal and private information dates back decades. But it took center stage after the 2015 mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, when Apple refused to open a backdoor into an assailant's encrypted cell phone for FBI investigators.

The agency ultimately paid a hacker to unlock the phone instead.

Library of Congress

This flu season is making regular headlines, especially in North Texas, where more than 100 people have died. It doesn't compare to the flu crisis the world endured a century ago, but we can still learn from it. 

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A team at the University of Texas at Dallas is developing a new method to treat pain by disrupting how the body processes it. 

Zachary Campbell researches pain on the molecular level at UT Dallas. His team's work describes a new method of reducing pain with RNA-based medicine. RNA stands for ribonucleic acid, which carries out genetic information from DNA to proteins.

Amazon

Amazon's future second headquarters offers a potential bounty of benefits for the winner, and Dallas and Austin are the only two locations in Texas that remain in the race.

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Autism affects about one in 68 children, and the condition poses social challenges, including difficulty processing social interactions, such as facial expressions and physical gestures.

New research out of UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas shows those social behaviors could be restored through a process called "neuromodulation," or brain stimulation.

Radiological Society of America

The horror stories about football and brain damage keep flowing out of the NFL, but surprisingly, little is known about how the sport affects the brains of young players. 

Zach Copley / Flickr

The value of the digital cryptocurrency bitcoin has been all over the map recently, reaching a high of about $20,000 per coin late last year to nearly $14,000 this week. That's a big leap for something that was worth just a dollar in 2011. 

But what exactly is bitcoin?

Molly Evans / KERA News

Robots are assuming more and more roles in our daily lives. They can ask us about our day, play songs for us and, as one study from the University of Texas Arlington shows, can perform Shakespeare with us, too. 

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

Dallas has a ways to go in providing more accessible public transportation to people across the city who need it most.

A new report commissioned by the city explores the state of mass transit in Dallas, specifically its affordability, coverage area, frequency and accessibility.

Dane Walters / KERA News

Most Texans don’t save enough money for retirement, according to a new study from the Austin-based Center for Public Policy Priorities

Cylonphoto / Shutterstock

The same fault that produced the 4 magnitude earthquake in May 2015 in Johnson County — the strongest ever recorded in North Texas — could create an even larger one in the future, a recent study has found.

Genesis Women's Shelter Facebook page

A new study on domestic violence in Dallas County shows that over five years, more than 100 people were killed by a spouse, significant other or date. It's called intimate partner violence.

The study also finds most of the victims didn't seek help before they were killed. Jan Langbein, CEO of the Genesis Women's Shelter in Dallas, offers her takeaways on the report.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT News

Recovering from the emotional effects of a traumatic event — whether it's Sunday's deadly shooting in Sutherland Springs or Hurricane Harvey this summer — can take years.

Dr. Carol North, a crisis psychiatrist with UT Southwestern Medical Center, has studied survivors of major disasters — from the Oklahoma City bombings to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks to Hurricane Katrina.

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Identifying a human body isn't easy when you're dealing with decomposed remains or just a few scattered bones. The Center for Human Identification at the University of North Texas specializes in these kinds of cases and receives requests for help from all over the nation. 

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