Justin Martin

All Things Considered Host

Justin Martin is KERA’s local host of All Things Considered, anchoring afternoon newscasts for KERA 90.1 & KXT 91.7. Justin is also responsible for editing and publishing online news content for KERA, and can be heard in various KERA radio and TV productions.

Justin grew up in Mannheim, Germany, and avidly listened to the Voice of America and National Public Radio whenever stateside. He graduated from the American Broadcasting School, and further polished his skills with radio veteran Kris Anderson of the Mighty 690 fame, a 50,000 watt border-blaster operating out of Tijuana, Mexico. Justin has worked as holiday anchor for the USA Radio Network, serving the U.S. Armed Forces Network. He’s also hosted, produced, and engineered several shows, including the Southern Gospel Jubilee on 660 KSKY.

Justin lives in Dallas with his pets and lovingly cultivates his addiction to coffee, classic video games, and all things technology.

Ways to Connect

umass.edu

A new type of weather radar is being tested in North Texas – it was used during December’s deadly tornadoes; and it has a long name: Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of The Atmosphere or CASA. Mark Fox is with the National Weather Service in Fort Worth and he explores the future of Texas weather technology.

Dallas Zoo

The top local news stories this evening from the KERA Newsroom: The Dallas Zoo has announced it's received permission from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to take in elephants from Swaziland, Africa. The Dallas Zoo says the elephants in question are in danger of being killed.

Operation Compass

Texas is second in the nation behind California in the number of reported human trafficking cases. That’s when people, including children, are sold into forced labor or the sex trade. The crimes are often unreported. 

Rrraum / Shutterstock.com

This year’s Opportunity Index was just released. It’s an annual big-data report that ranks states on how easy it is for people to improve their lives financially. This year, Texas ranks in the bottom third -- 36th overall.

Cirrus Bonneau

In the 1980s, North Texas was a professional wrestling hot spot. World Class Championship Wrestling was televised to fans across the globe from Dallas-Fort Worth. A new exhibit at UT Arlington shows off the group’s outrageous outfits, the high drama, and the loud crowds that gathered to take it all in. 

Gage Skidmore / The Texas Tribune

The top local stories this evening from the KERA Newsroom: Republican Presidential Contender Donald Trump is in Dallas for a rally at the American Airlines Center.

Dean Terry / Flickr

Thanks to corporate relocations, more people are moving into North Texas, and that’s just one of the reasons housing is getting more expensive; prices are up 10 to 30 percent in some areas. Candace Carlisle covers real estate for the Dallas Business Journal and she takes a look at the market.

Arthur Rothstein / Library of Congress

Forgotten lore from Dallas, fascinating photos from iconic landmarks, and a cornucopia of North Texas history -- it's all online at Flashbackdallas.com. Paula Bosse runs the website and she talks about her passion for the city and its curious past.

Mike Merchant / Texas A&M Agrilife Dallas

Some people are afraid of spiders. And most spiders don’t like other spiders, either -- they often eat each other. In North Texas, a strange thing has happened. Thousands of spiders worked together to build a communal mega-web -- it's about 40 feet high and as long as a football field. 

Kenny Ryan / SMU

This month marks the 70th anniversary of the bombing of Japan. Two atomic bombs named ‘Little Boy’ and ‘Fat Man’ were dropped on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 in an effort to end World War II. A Texan, Major James Hopkins, piloted one of the planes on the Nagasaki mission. 

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