Eyder Peralta | KERA News

Eyder Peralta

Emojis were supposed to be the great equalizer: a language all its own capable of transcending borders and cultural differences.

Not so fast, say a group of researchers who found that different people had vastly different interpretations of some popular emojis. The researchers published their findings for GroupLens, a research lab based out of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.

The opinion section of the Boston Globe is turning heads today. They've just published a fake front page from the future that details the kind of world a President Donald Trump would usher in.

The news from April 9, 2017, includes fake stories about a market crash triggered by a trade war, the beginning of mass deportations and a story about the military refusing the orders of its civilian leadership.

Over the past year, investigative journalists across the world have been sifting through 11.5 million internal files from the Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca.

One of the blockbuster cases before the Supreme Court this term may very well end up in a 4-4 tie.

During a press conference in Argentina, President Obama laid out how his administration is handling the Islamic State.

He said the U.S. is making gains in Iraq and Syria, but stopping attacks like those in Brussels is "difficult work."

Rob Ford, the former Toronto mayor whose drug-addled fall from grace made international news, has died.

Ford had been fighting cancer since 2014. In a statement, his family said he died earlier today at age 46.

"A dedicated man of the people, Councillor Ford spent his life serving the citizens of Toronto," the family said in a statement.

Capping a historic visit to Cuba, President Obama delivered a sweeping speech about American ideals and reconciliation at the Gran Teatro de la Havana.

"I have come here to bury the last remnant of the Cold War in the Americas," Obama said.

The speech was carried live by Cuban state television, giving Obama a chance to speak directly to the Cuban people. Cuban President Raúl Castro sat in the balcony of the theater, where he heard Obama issue a tough rebuke of the Cuban regime's crackdown on dissent.

"This is a new day — es un nuevo dia — between our two countries," President Obama said after meeting with Cuban President Raúl Castro in Havana.

The two leaders agreed that there are still deep fissures between the two countries and that a healthy relationship between them will take work.

That uneasiness was apparent as soon as journalists began asking questions. Obama and Castro were not supposed to take questions, but a last minute change made that possible and Obama called first on CNN's Jim Acosta, who is Cuban-American.

When Martin Luther King Jr. made his "I Have A Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial in 1963, Bob Adelman was standing just a few feet away with a camera to his eye.

From the March on Washington to Dr. King's funeral, he captured some of the most iconic images of the civil rights movement.

The photographer was found dead on Saturday in his home in Miami Beach. Ernesto Rodriguez, a spokesman for the Miami Beach Police Department, said his death is still being investigated.

Adelman was 85.

Silvio Carrillo is walking in the shadow of the U.S. Capitol. Since his aunt was killed, he has spent his days talking to lawmakers and influencers in Washington, trying to convince them that Honduras is a repressive regime that doesn't deserve U.S. help.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Today is 3/14, also known as Pi Day. NPR's Eyder Peralta reports on why pi still matters.

EYDER PERALTA, BYLINE: Here's how mathematician Carlos Castillo-Chavez describes pi.

A curious crowd lingered around Amal Graafstra as he carefully unpacked a pair of gloves, a small sterile blanket and a huge needle. A long line of people were waiting to get tiny computer chips implanted into their hands.

Graafstra had set up shop in a booth in the middle of an exhibit hall at the Austin Convention Center in Texas' capital, where he gathered last month with several hundred others who call themselves "body hackers" — people who push the boundaries of implantable technology to improve the human body.

Verizon Wireless has agreed to pay a $1.35 million fine to settle with the Federal Communications Commission over allegations that it improperly used "supercookies."

The unique identifiers, which Verizon uses to target advertising to its mobile users, remain on wireless devices even when a customer clears a device's cache.

Investigators had found that Verizon had been using "supercookies" since December 2012, but the company didn't disclose it was doing so until October 2014.

Peyton Manning, the NFL's all-time leading passer and its winningest starting quarterback, told the Denver Broncos that he is retiring, a spokesman for team says.

Manning is stepping away from the game after winning his second Super Bowl and after 18 seasons.

Berta Cáceres, a hugely influential Honduran indigenous rights activist, was killed in her hometown of La Esperenza, Intibucá, on Thursday. She would have turned 46 tomorrow.

Cáceres was awarded the Goldman Environmental Prize after she led a peaceful campaign to stop one of the world's largest dam builders from pursuing the Agua Zarca Dam, which would have cut off the ethnic Lenca people from water, food and medicine.

Retired soccer player Brandi Chastain, who became a superstar when she scored the game-winning goal for the U.S. in the 1999 World Cup final against China, says she will donate her brain to science.

After hearing oral arguments on what could be one of the most important abortion cases decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in decades, NPR's Nina Totenberg says that the only thing that is certain is that Justice Anthony Kennedy will cast the deciding vote.

As expected, Nina says, the three conservatives and four liberals on the court stuck to their positions for and against a Texas law that puts restrictions on abortions.

After more than a decade, Major League Baseball is coming back to Cuba and it will have a very important spectator.

The White House announced on Tuesday that President Obama would be on hand in Havana to watch an exhibition game between the Tampa Bay Rays and the Cuban National Team on March 22.

The Rays will be the first MLB franchise to play on the island since the Orioles played an exhibition game in 1999.

Craig Windham, a voice familiar to many NPR listeners, died unexpectedly last night of a pulmonary embolism. He was 66.

Windham was an award-winning journalist who covered presidential campaigns, hurricanes, earthquakes and the first Persian Gulf War. More recently, he focused on anchoring and reporting for NPR's Newscasts. In less than 40 seconds, Windham could explain the intricacies of a complicated bill or capture the glory of a space shuttle flying over the nation's capital.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

Play ball - spring training starts in just two days. And Major League Baseball will continue its efforts to speed up the game with several new rules. NPR's Eyder Peralta reports.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

When he thinks about his future, Alfredo Trejo takes a deep breath.

"Many of the people who have been rounded up and will be deported, they already know their future," he says. "They'll die of hunger or they'll be killed by bullets."

When he thinks about his future, Alfredo Trejo takes a deep breath.

"Many of those people who have been rounded up and will be deported, they already know their future," he says. "They'll die of hunger or they'll be killed by bullets."

This morning, the Supreme Court draped a black wool crepe on Justice Antonin Scalia's chair and the bench in front of it.

The White House says the president will not move to appoint a Supreme Court replacement for Justice Antonin Scalia while the Senate is in recess this week.

In an interview with ABC News, White House spokesman Eric Schultz said Obama would would wait to announce his nominee until Congress returns from its break later this month. In an email to NPR, Schultz said the White House had ruled out a recess appointment "this week."

In terms of the ideological balance of the Supreme Court, the death of Justice Antonin Scalia is monumental. With Scalia, the court had four reliable conservative votes and, in Justice Kennedy, the court had a conservative swing vote.

That led to many decisions that were decided by a razor thin 5-to-4 margin. To gauge Scalia's importance, we dug through the Supreme Court Database and found that during Obama's presidency, 53 cases have been decided by a 5-4 majority that included Scalia.

On a frigid morning in Washington, the flags fluttered at half staff. Under a cloudless sky, the Supreme Court building looked brilliant.

A small American flag was draped at the foot of the steps and mourners placed flowers and candles to pay tribute to Justice Antonin Scalia.

Bill Follett, a trial judge from California, was visiting Washington with his family. He stood right in front of the memorial for a moment.

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