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Kenneth Starr, known for leading an investigation of President Bill Clinton, says he has resigned as Baylor University's chancellor.

The private Texas university has been rocked by an independent report that found the university mishandled allegations of sexual harassment and assault. Last week, the university stripped Starr of the presidency and suspended head football coach Art Briles.

Former Attorney General Eric Holder says Edward Snowden's leak was "inappropriate and illegal" but "I think that he actually performed a public service by raising the debate that we engaged in and by the changes that we made."

Holder, who was attorney general when Snowden leaked highly sensitive documents that detailed some of the work of the National Security Agency, made the comments in an interview with former Obama adviser David Axelrod.

An animal rights group is calling on the United States Department of Agriculture to fine the Cincinnati Zoo after it killed a gorilla named Harambe to protect a child who had climbed into its enclosure.

After an unprecedented trial, the former president of Chad has been found guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity by a court in Senegal.

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports that former President Hissène Habré ruled for eight years until 1990.

Ofeibea filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Former President Hissène Habré's trial on war crimes charges has been a landmark for international justice — the first time in the world the courts of one country have prosecuted a former leader of another on human rights charges.

Acknowledging the American service members who have lost their lives in war, President Obama laid a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery on Monday.

"The Americans who rest here and their families ... ask of us today only one thing in return: that we remember them," Obama said.

Via the White House, here's video of the ceremony:

A kidnapped Mexican soccer player was rescued overnight after local and federal Mexican authorities launched a huge operation to secure his return.

Alan Pulido, who plays for the Greek soccer club Olympiakos, appeared before cameras in the early hours of Monday wearing a shorts and a tank top and with his right hand bandaged.

"What's most important is that he is here with us," Tamaulipas Gov. Egidio Torre Cantú told reporters.

When asked how he was doing, Pulido said, "Very good. Thank God."

Forces fighting against the Islamic State have launched an offensive to retake the Iraqi city of Fallujah.

NPR's Alison Meuse reports that international aid groups have seen hundreds of civilians fleeing, but they represent only a fraction of those still trapped in the city.

Alison filed this report for our Newscast unit:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

During her tenure as secretary of state, Hillary Clinton violated department policies when she used a personal email account to conduct official business, a new report from the Office of the Inspector General for the State Department found.

The report, which was obtained by NPR's Susan Davis ahead of its public release, reads:

The athletics company Under Armour has reached a record $280 million apparel deal with the University of California, Los Angeles, according to the company.

The Los Angeles Times reports this is the largest deal in college football history and that it follows other blockbuster agreements struck recently by Nike with Ohio State and the University of Texas.

The Times adds:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Everyone needs a copy editor. (Thank you, Susan and Amy and Pam.)

Today, the Texas Republican Party is probably wishing it had one, too.

Check out this sentence from the just-adopted 2016 party platform:

Morley Safer, who reported from around the world for nearly five decades on the newsmagazine 60 Minutes, has died. He was 84.

Safer was the longest-serving correspondent on the show, and had just announced his retirement last week during a special that recapped his career.

Here's how CBS News describes his work:

An Amtrak engineer might have lost track of where he was right before a passenger train derailed, killing eight people and injuring scores of others, federal investigators have found.

In a briefing with reporters Tuesday, investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board said Brandon Bostian might have thought he was past a curve when he accelerated to 106 mph.

A story that started off as viral catnip highlighting the thoughtlessness of tourists took a dark turn on Monday.

The National Park Service announced that a bison calf, which was put in the back of a van by tourists at Yellowstone National Park who thought it looked cold, had to be euthanized.

The story of the tourists went viral over the weekend after a picture of the baby bison in the van was posted online.

President Obama honored 13 law enforcement officers with the Public Safety Medal of Valor on Monday.

All of the officers were recognized for showing exceptional courage despite threats to their personal safety.

"It was your courage and quick thinking that gave us our safety," Obama said at the White House. "Although, this particular moment for which you are being honored is remarkable ... we know every day you go out there, you have a tough job."

Saying they now have new information that significantly changes the case before them, the Supreme Court justices sidestepped a constitutional decision on the latest Obamacare challenge and sent the government and the religious organizations back to the drawing board.

In a unanimous decision, the court said it was not deciding the central question in the case: whether Obamacare's contraceptive mandate substantially burdens some organizations' right to exercise their religion.

In what is being billed as a "window into the future impacts of global sea-level rise," scientists have documented how the ocean swallowed up five small islands that were part of the Solomon Islands archipelago northeast of Australia.

Writing in the Environmental Research Letters, the researchers say this is the first scientific account of how climate change is affecting coastlines in the Solomons.

Update on Wednesday May 11:

The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists just released a searchable database with the names of more than 300,000 people and companies included in the so-called "Panama Papers."

The database is barebones, containing the name of the entity and how its connected to an offshore account.

The musician Prince had an appointment to meet with an addiction doctor the day after he died, a lawyer for that doctor said during a news conference this afternoon.

Minnesota Public Radio reports:

Saying he was making a "tough decision," Puerto Rican Gov. Alejandro García Padilla announced the island would not make a more than $400 million debt payment due today.

"I've had to choose and I have made a choice," García said in a message to the commonwealth. "I've decided that your basic needs come before anything else."

NPR's Jim Zarroli filed this report for our Newscast unit:

The Rev. Daniel Berrigan, a Jesuit priest who became emblematic of the movement opposing U.S. involvement in Vietnam after an audacious act of civil disobedience, died on Saturday.

The Jesuit magazine, America, reports that he died at age 94 at the Murray-Weigel Jesuit Community in the Bronx, New York.

In his lab at George Mason University in Virginia, Sean Luke has all kinds of robots: big ones with wheels; medium ones that look like humans. And then he has a couple of dozen that look like small, metal boxes.

He and his team at the Autonomous Robotics Lab are training those little ones to work together without the help of a human.

In the future, Luke and his team hope those little robots can work like ants — in teams of hundreds, for example, to build houses, or help search for survivors after a disaster.

Real estate heir and suspected serial killer Robert Durst will spend seven years and a month in prison after he pleaded guilty to a weapons charge.

U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt approved the plea deal on Wednesday.

A federal appeals court has reinstated Tom Brady's four-game suspension over his involvement in the "Deflategate" scandal.

In a 2-1 decision, a three-judge panel of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a lower court ruling that found NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell was not fair when he handed down the suspension.

(This post was last updated at 6:15 p.m. EDT.)

Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew announced on Wednesday that the countenance of abolitionist leader Harriet Tubman will grace a new $20 bill.

The decision caps a public campaign asking for a woman to be placed on American paper currency and months of deliberation by the Treasury to replace either Alexander Hamilton on the $10 bill or Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill.

(This post was last updated at 6:55 p.m. EDT.)

The Supreme Court handed Iran's central bank a loss on Wednesday, saying Congress acted constitutionally when it passed a law saying nearly $2 billion in frozen Iranian funds should be turned over to Americans who U.S. courts had found were victims of Iranian terrorist attacks.

Two Tennessee lawmakers are calling for a federal investigation into the arrest of at least five elementary school children.

According to the Daily News Journal in Murfreesboro, the children, who ranged in age from 6 to 10, were handcuffed and taken to a juvenile detention center because they failed to stop a fight that happened away from school property.

A federal court sided with a transgender teen on Tuesday, saying that a lower court should have deferred to the federal government's assertion that Title IX protects transgender students.

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