Doualy Xaykaothao | KERA News

Doualy Xaykaothao

Doualy Xaykaothao covers breaking news from Asia for NPR News. She's based in Bangkok, Thailand, and her reports can be heard across all NPR News programs.

Xaykaothao joined NPR in 1999 as a production assistant for Morning Edition and has since worked as an NPR producer, editor, director and reporter for NPR's award-winning programs. As a producer for NPR's Newscast Unit, she was a member of the team receiving the 2001 Peabody Award for its coverage of the aftermath of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, Xaykaothao began reporting about anti-war protests from Seoul, South Korea. A year later, Xaykaothao was in the Phang Nga region of Thailand reporting on the aftermath of the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami. In 2006, Xaykaothao served as a fellow for the International Reporting Project at Johns Hopkins University-SAIS with a focus on women inside Nepal's 10 year civil war. Xaykaothao was also an Annenberg Fellow for NPR member station KPCC in Los Angeles in 2007, and was part of the reporting team to receive a LA Press Club Award for breaking coverage of the California wildfires. By 2009, Xaykaothao was in Indonesia reporting on the earthquake that devastated Padang. In 2010, she reported about North Korea's deadly attack on a South Korean warship. When Japan was struck by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake, Xaykaothao was the first NPR reporter to reach Fukushima to report on the triple disasters in 2011.

Xaykaothao is Lao-Hmong American. She was born in Vientiane, Laos, but raised in France and the United States. She attended college in upstate New York, where she specialized in television, radio, political science, and ethnic studies. Her radio career began at Harlem community radio station WHCR 90.3 FM, where she volunteered as news-reader. Later, at Pacifica Radio's WBAI 99.5 FM, she worked for the station's resident film critic, the late Paul Wunder. At Pacifica, she also coordinated and produced Asia Pacific Forum, a program on politics, culture and arts inside Asian American communities, as well as missed stories from Asia.

For those who are curious, Doualy Xaykaothao is pronounced "dwah-hlee sigh-kow-tao."

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

On Thursday, we heard from a single mom about her transition out of the foster care system. In the final part of KERA’s Remaking Foster Care, we’ll hear from another person who aged out of the system: a 24-year-old from East Dallas.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

KERA’s Remaking Foster Care series continues with two young adults who “aged” out of the system when they turned 18. 

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

In the rural town of Rio Vista, south of Fort Worth, a husband and wife has fostered more than 50 children in the last eight years. 

Mathew Terrell / Facebook

In our series “Remaking Foster Care,” KERA is exploring efforts by the state of Texas to redesign the foster care system – and profiling the people who’ll be affected. Today, we’ll zero in on biological parents.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

About 45,000 young Texans can’t safely live with their parents. A third of them are in state custody. They’re trying to navigate a foster care system that’s faced crisis after crisis – from stories of child abuse and neglect-related deaths, to reports of over-medicated children, and others sent hundreds of miles from home.  

A foster care official who worked with countless Texas kids and young adults for two decades has died. Jerry Sullivan was only 44.

Texas Health Resources Facebook

An attorney for one of the two nurses who contracted Ebola at a Dallas hospital last fall says her client is going ahead with plans to sue her employer.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Forget to buy your vitamins? How about that last minute gift? Or need your favorite book for that weekend trip? Now, online shoppers in North Texas can get tens of thousands of items from Amazon delivered in an hour or less. The new service -- Prime Now -- is available in 24 zip codes in the Dallas/ Fort Worth area.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Some 50,000 military veterans are homeless each night in the United States. In parts of North Texas, that number is declining. The latest census shows the homeless vet count in Fort Worth has dropped by one-third compared to last year. Seventy vets in that city currently call the Presbyterian Night Shelter home. On Tuesday, at a fundraiser for a vets program, a retired Marine general told vets he's got their backs.    

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Protesters carried small anti-racism placards and walked up and down the street in the affluent Northwest Dallas neighborhood where Parker Rice lives.

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