Bill Zeeble | KERA News

Bill Zeeble

Reporter

Bill Zeeble has been a full-time reporter at KERA since 1992, covering everything from medicine to the Mavericks and education to environmental issues. He’s won numerous awards over the years, with top honors from the Dallas Press Club, Texas Medical Association, the Dallas and Texas Bar Associations, the American Diabetes Association and a national health reporting grant from the Kaiser Family Foundation. Zeeble was born in Philadelphia, Pa. and grew up in the nearby suburb of Cherry Hill, NJ, where he became an accomplished timpanist and drummer. Heading to college near Chicago on a scholarship, he fell in love with public radio, working at the college classical/NPR station, and he has pursued public radio ever since.

His first real radio gig was with a classical station in Corpus Christi, where the new Texan was dubbed “Billy Ted”; he was also a manager at WWNO-FM in New Orleans. Several stories he covered on television for KERA 13 helped homeowners avoid losing their homes. Zeeble remains dedicated to radio, however, and spends time working with NPR to teach students how to do radio journalism. His radio pieces have aired on nearly every national news show carried on KERA, from NPR and American Public Media to the BBC. He and his wife have 2 dogs and 2 cats, adopted and rescued. His home desk is messy with vintage fountain pens and parts to aid his passion to make them work again.

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City of Dallas

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings will sign on to a resolution supporting teacher evaluations based on student achievement while attacking teacher retention based on seniority. 

Texas ranks near the bottom when it comes to states getting nutritious, summer meals to low-income students. Many contend that it doesn't need to be that way, because free meals are offered to all North Texans 18 or under.

Incoming Dallas Superintendent Mike Miles defended his moves so far, including hiring his communications director for more than twice her salary in Colorado Springs.

Dallas Symphony Orchestra

In 1992, fewer than two percent of major American orchestra members were people of color. Some Dallas Symphony members decided that would not do.

Bill Zeeble / KERA

In an unusual move, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins ordered a barrier erected to keep the press away from court members, including Commissioner John Wiley Price.

Dallas Area Rapid Transit is proposing fare hikes for most riders, to cover additional services. The public will have a chance to chime in on the changes over the next few week. But it’s no surprise many dislike them.

The Dallas school district’s free summer meals program starts today.

The summer food service program is set up to feed nutritious meals to all Dallas youth 18 and younger through much of the summer, regardless of family income. That’s because, as the district says, hunger doesn’t take a summer break. To eat, just show up.

Bill Zeeble

Across north Texas, school will be out for the summer by the end of today. Many districts ended yesterday, including DISD. Emotions ran high at one Dallas school, because it will not re-open in the fall.

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There were 11 democrats vying for the Congressional District 33 nomination. Now the field has narrowed to two.

Bill Zeeble

Thousands upon thousands turned out to honor American service men and women on Memorial Day at DFW’s National Cemetery. This was also the first year volunteers placed small American Flags at every gravesite.

Bill Zeeble / KERA

It’s the last day of early voting before next Tuesday’s primary. In the crowded race for the new Congressional District 33 seat, two perceived frontrunners are still campaigning.

It’s morning in Oak Cliff. Standing by volunteers and his campaign bus, former Dallas City Council member and State Representative Domingo Garcia gets ready to roll across the new district the covers parts of Dallas and Tarrant Counties. He’ll make five stops, and especially target Fort Worth State Representative, Marc Veasey.

Bill Zeeble / KERA

Dallas officials and the Texas National Guard tore down their 105th abandoned home today. The Guard has helped many cities throughout the state clean up since 1993. 

Matt Katzenberger / (cc) flickr

Another smaller earthquake hit East Texas Sunday. After Thursday’s second earthquake near Timpson, Texas  in Shelby County - in as many weeks -  injection wells from drilling are again a suspected culprit. Reports indicate more research is needed in East Texas to reach that conclusion, but even that might not be enough.

BJ Austin / KERA News

After 27 years in office, John Wiley Price is Dallas County’s best-known and most controversial County Commissioner. He’s also under federal investigation. 

All three school board candidates endorsed by a young Dallas political action committee won seats on Saturday. 

New Dallas Superintendent Mike Miles gave his first presentation to the school board Thursday. He's got some ambitious goals, and he hopes to achieve them by the end of the decade. 

Miles said he wants 90 percent of DISD students to graduate by the year 2020 and wants 60 percent to score at least a 21 on the ACT college entrance exams.  He said only some 13 percent achieve that score now. 

For the first time, the Dallas School District’s Talented and Gifted Magnet High School is the best high school in the country, according to today’s U.S. News and World Report. Townview’s Science and Engineering magnet is number three.

School board elections notoriously draw few voters. But there's a new Dallas political action committee with a lot of money that could sway the election May 12.

Two wrongfully convicted men sentenced to life for rape and attempted murder will start the formal process of regaining their freedom this morning. KERA’s Bill Zeeble reports prosecutors say they’ve also identified the real suspects.

It’s official. The Dallas School Board hired Mike Miles last night as DISD’s new Superintendent. KERA’s Bill Zeeble reports Miles will tackle his duties even sooner than the scheduled July 1st start date.

In the aftermath of Kern Wildenthal’s resignation as special assistant to UT Southwestern Medical Center’s president, the school says it will immediately strengthen audit functions.

Scientists say there’s enough wasted energy in Texas to power our lights for centuries. KERA’s Bill Zeeble reports on SMU researchers and a business who are turning waste heat from oil and gas wells into electricity.

Plano ISD’s incoming superintendent, Richard Matkin, officially takes over next month. For eleven years, he was the Chief Financial Officer, then filled the interim role since February. KERA’s Bill Zeeble talked to Matkin about the challenges he faces at the increasingly diverse Plano ISD.

The Texas Education Agency says it’s re-evaluating the way it approves tutoring companies who bill millions in federal dollars for services. KERA’s Bill Zeeble follows up on last week’s DISD report of alleged fraud by some companies.

Seth Sawyers / Flickr Creative Commons

An auditing firm hired by the Dallas Independent School district says it has uncovered falsified documents linked to significant fraud through tutoring services. KERA’s Bill Zeeble reports hundreds of students who needed help may never have received it.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

One of the fastest growing charter school operators in north Texas is Uplift Education. This August, it’ll open its first Fort Worth schools and its newest Dallas campus in Deep Ellum. KERA Bill Zeeble wondered, who is Uplift Education?

Neenah History / Flickr

Plano’s school board could pick a superintendent finalist at tonight’s special board meeting. The search is to replace Doug Otto, who stepped down in January.

Jacqueline Fellows / KERA

With more bad weather predicted for North Texas, Lancaster officials want residents to sign up for the free Code Red Weather Warning system. 

Bill Zeeble / KERA

Texas Governor Rick Perry expects rapid federal relief for the North Texas communities ravaged by Tuesday’s tornadoes. KERA’s Bill Zeeble reports Perry met with Lancaster residents, where hundreds of homes sustained twister damage and many were destroyed.

In Arlington, residents are assessing damage and cleaning up after Tuesday’s destructive tornadoes. KERA’s Bill Zeeble visited some of the city’s hardest hit neighborhoods.

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