Bill Zeeble

Reporter

Bill Zeeble has been a full-time reporter at KERA since 1992, covering everything from medicine to the Mavericks and education to environmental issues. He’s won numerous awards over the years, with top honors from the Dallas Press Club, Texas Medical Association, the Dallas and Texas Bar Associations, the American Diabetes Association and a national health reporting grant from the Kaiser Family Foundation. Zeeble was born in Philadelphia, Pa. and grew up in the nearby suburb of Cherry Hill, NJ, where he became an accomplished timpanist and drummer. Heading to college near Chicago on a scholarship, he fell in love with public radio, working at the college classical/NPR station, and he has pursued public radio ever since.

His first real radio gig was with a classical station in Corpus Christi, where the new Texan was dubbed “Billy Ted”; he was also a manager at WWNO-FM in New Orleans. Several stories he covered on television for KERA 13 helped homeowners avoid losing their homes. Zeeble remains dedicated to radio, however, and spends time working with NPR to teach students how to do radio journalism. His radio pieces have aired on nearly every national news show carried on KERA, from NPR and American Public Media to the BBC. He and his wife have 2 dogs and 2 cats, adopted and rescued. His home desk is messy with vintage fountain pens and parts to aid his passion to make them work again.

A new study is out – and it’s focused on America’s charter school petri dish, New Orleans. It shows that the charter schools there are more focused on marketing and advertising themselves, rather classroom performance. KERA’s Bill Zeeble reports on what the research, from the University of Texas and Tulane, could mean for charters in North Texas.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

City Council members control the agenda and microphones, but can’t talk during meetings about anything that’s not on the official agenda. So on Wednesday, a pair of council members planned to leave their seats and head for the public microphone. The topic? What could be the hottest issue in May’s election: the proposed Trinity toll road. At the last minute, though, the city attorney put the kibosh on their plans.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott stopped in Dallas Monday after an ice storm kept him away earlier this month. With his first legislative session almost at its midpoint, the governor talked about his priorities, his experience and progress so far.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Richard Fisher’s headed the Dallas Federal Reserve Bank for a decade. Next week, he steps down after leading the bank through a historic recession and a slow, steady recovery. He gave his goodbye speech Friday.  

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Neiman Marcus, Dallas’ famous high-end retailer, is the first store with a full-size digital mirror. It records what you try on so you can compare clothes side by side then lets you share those looks with others online. The high-tech mirror arrived at a North Texas store last month.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Most North Texas school kids reveled in their third day off in the last two weeks Thursday -- with spring break coming for many next week. But those days off create headaches for districts trying to reschedule snow and ice days.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

With ice in the rear-view mirror and snow arriving Wednesday morning, North Texas road crews are gearing up for another round of winter. Three big techniques help make roads passable: chemicals, “brine” and the old standby -- sand.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Adult GED students often juggle family, job, and classes to get that high school-equivalency diploma. And then there’s the cost of the test. Dallas – based Atmos Energy has started picking up the tab.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

It’s Fare-war time again at Love Field. Virgin America announced it’ll fly from Dallas to Austin for $39. That got the attention of Dallas-based Southwest, which built its business, in part, on that route.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

UPDATE: A Dallas schools investigation into an executive with a criminal background continues, and so may a Human Resources audit, even though that department  chief resigned three weeks ago. During Monday’s late night board meeting, trustees discussed the HR scandal and the response by superintendent Mike Miles.

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