Bill Zeeble | KERA News

Bill Zeeble

Reporter

Bill Zeeble has been a full-time reporter at KERA since 1992, covering everything from medicine to the Mavericks and education to environmental issues. He’s won numerous awards over the years, with top honors from the Dallas Press Club, Texas Medical Association, the Dallas and Texas Bar Associations, the American Diabetes Association and a national health reporting grant from the Kaiser Family Foundation. Zeeble was born in Philadelphia, Pa. and grew up in the nearby suburb of Cherry Hill, NJ, where he became an accomplished timpanist and drummer. Heading to college near Chicago on a scholarship, he fell in love with public radio, working at the college classical/NPR station, and he has pursued public radio ever since.

His first real radio gig was with a classical station in Corpus Christi, where the new Texan was dubbed “Billy Ted”; he was also a manager at WWNO-FM in New Orleans. Several stories he covered on television for KERA 13 helped homeowners avoid losing their homes. Zeeble remains dedicated to radio, however, and spends time working with NPR to teach students how to do radio journalism. His radio pieces have aired on nearly every national news show carried on KERA, from NPR and American Public Media to the BBC. He and his wife have 2 dogs and 2 cats, adopted and rescued. His home desk is messy with vintage fountain pens and parts to aid his passion to make them work again.

Ways to Connect

John Wiley Price Campaign/YouTube

The jury in the federal corruption trial of John Wiley Price begins deliberating his fate Wednesday morning. The longtime Dallas County Commissioner faces charges of bribery, mail fraud, and tax evasion. His assistant Dapheny Fain also faces charges.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

The Dallas Stars Thursday named a new coach – and he's the same one who brought them a Stanley Cup nearly two decades ago. The announcement of Ken Hitchcock's hiring comes after the Stars melted down in one of their worst seasons since coming to Dallas.

Shutterstock

The Dallas City Council on Wednesday approved up to $100,000 to increase security for the city’s emergency alarms system, which was triggered last weekend by someone from the Dallas area, according to officials.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

State Sen. Don Huffines, R-Dallas, wants to shut down an agency called Dallas County Schools. It provides bus service to several North Texas school districts, including Dallas ISD, which favors the senator’s plans.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Focus Academy, an 18-year-old charter school in southern Dallas, is about to close because the state says it has failed to improve bad ratings three years running. The school wants a reprieve after taking in kids from Prime Prep Academy — the school that former Dallas Cowboy Deion Sanders founded. The state shut it down two years ago.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Police estimate 3,200 people marched through downtown Dallas yesterday demanding an end to immigrant bashing and growing racial violence. The "Mega March" copied the rally of 11 years ago. That one drew a half million people. This much smaller crowd shared similar goals.

 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Families and students of Focus Academies in southern Dallas are holding a rally Thursday to make a last-ditch bid to keep the school open. The state says the charter school has agreed to close after poor academic years.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

In Texas, only a handful of people can legally use medical marijuana. So the vast majority who use it that way just keep quiet. One Richardson family with an autistic child has broken its silence.

The Zartlers hope Senate Bill 269 will pass in the state Legislature; it would change the medical marijuana law, so they’d no longer have to break it.

Samantha Guzman / KERA News

Duncanville High School has undergone big demographic changes in recent years. Today, about 70 percent of the students are considered economically disadvantaged — students like Rykeyia Branch. The high school senior is juggling classes with a part-time job and her role as manager of the Panthers softball team.

Lara Solt / KERA News special contributor

Texas ranks third in the country for the highest number of homeless students in public schools, and research suggests these kids fall behind academically because they’re prone to more health problems.

Pages