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Judge Blocks Ezekiel Elliott's 6-Game Suspension Over Domestic Case

A federal judge blocked Dallas Cowboys star Ezekiel Elliott's six-game suspension over a domestic violence case Friday, setting the stage for a potentially lengthy legal fight with the NFL.

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The High Five

KERA takes a look at five stories that have North Texas talking — buzz from D-FW and across the state.

Dallas, TX – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Cuca Gonzalez was horribly sick last year when she arrived at the emergency room for John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth.

Dallas, TX – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: Parkland's budget crisis began last year when it got hit with declining state and federal revenues. County commissioners had to raise taxes 10% to fund the hospital, but even then, administrators needed $30 million of Parkland's reserve funds to keep it operating. So the hospital began putting pressure on physicians to keep costs down. Susan Briner is a pediatrician at one of Parkland's seven community clinics.

Dallas, TX – Presidential wannabe Al Gore doesn't want to take credit for current gas prices. Yet, of the myriad things he has taken credit for - the Internet, Love Canal, "Love Story," and the economy - it's the one thing he genuinely has some responsibility for. After all, in his book, "Earth in the Balance," Gore wrote that higher fossil fuel prices were desirable as a national energy policy, and he cast the tie-breaking vote for 1993's gas tax increase.

DALLAS – Enoch Diaz, Harwood Street resident: This kite here, my daughter, that was her first little project. I save it. I save all this little stuff from the kids, from the years back. (Laughs)

Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter (to Diaz): You're taking it with you?

Diaz: Those are all good memories.

KHVN 970 AM announcer (on tape): Heaven 97. It is now time for a special edition, a special program, a 15-minute program on the Lee Alcorn controversy.

Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: The controversy that rocked Dallas's African-American and Jewish communities began Monday. Local NAACP President Lee Alcorn was appearing on KHVN, a black gospel radio station, when he criticized Al Gore for picking Senator Joseph Lieberman, who is Jewish, over an African-American as his running mate.

DALLAS – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: DART's current plans for light rail in North Texas do not hinge on the results of Saturday's election. The same cities will get light rail service no matter how the vote turns out. The big question is when.

Jesse Oliver, Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) Board Chair: It moves up on an average of five years.

Sprague: Jesse Oliver is chair of the DART Board.

Oliver: So rather than waiting until 2010, 2008 for that service, we're talking about 2004, 2006.

DALLAS – Suzanne Sprague, KERA 90.1 Reporter: As soon as former Superintendent Bill Rojas announced he wanted to leave the Dallas public schools, local business leaders began calling for trustees to consider hiring a non-traditional candidate: someone with management and leadership skills, but not necessarily a background in education. Dozens of community leaders turned out last night to voice their opposition to this proposal. Adelfa Callejo is a long-time Hispanic activist.


Latest from NPR

'Knocking on eternity's door' — NASA's Voyager mission turns 40

2 hours ago

NASA’s Voyager mission celebrates 40 years in space this year, and humanity has much to thank it for.

Voyager brought to Earth the first close-up views of Uranus and Neptune. It revealed "spokes" in the rings of Saturn and details of Jupiter’s storm that had never been seen or even imagined. It imaged Io’s volcanic plumes and found the potential for life on the moons Enceladus and Titan.

Updated at 11:00 a.m. ET Sunday

After leaving a path of destruction through parts of the Caribbean, Hurricane Irma's eye reached the lower Florida Keys around 9 a.m. Sunday and as it headed for Florida's southwest coast, its winds only "continued to increase," according to the National Hurricane Center.

President Trump appears to be in the mood to make deals with Democrats — and Democrats see an opportunity to protect young immigrants.

On Wednesday, the president overruled leaders of his own party — and members of his own Cabinet — to back a plan pushed by Democrats to pair hurricane relief aid to a short-term hike in the debt ceiling along with a measure to keep the government funded until early December.

Editor's note: In the 1950s, the U.S. poultry industry began adopting a new process: Acronization. Ads that ran in women's magazines pictured crisp-skinned whole chicken that tasted "fresh," "wholesome" and "country sweet" thanks to a "revolutionary process which helps maintain freshness in perishables" like chicken. In reality, Acronization referred to the use of antibiotics. Birds were doused in a diluted solution of antibiotics while they were being butchered. The goal was to keep the meat from spoiling, allowing birds to be sold not just days, but weeks after slaughter.

The Food and Drug Administration recently approved the first U.S. treatment for childhood cases of Chagas disease — a parasite-driven illness that, over time and unless treated early, can cause serious heart problems in about a third of the people it infects.

There are perhaps 300,000 cases in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; the illness is much more common in Latin America, where it affects millions.


History, science, politics, books and more with Krys Boyd.

Our Most Popular Stories

Here Are 39 Things You Should Do In Texas Before You Die

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a list of things you should do in the Lone Star State before you kick the bucket.

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One Crisis Away: No Place To Go

West Dallas has been on the financial edge for generations. And that's just now starting to change.