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Brandon Formby / Texas Tribune

Across Texas, Tens Of Thousands Participate In Women's Marches

The day after the inauguration of President Donald Trump, tens of thousands of Texans took part in women's marches across the state, flooding the streets around the state Capitol in Austin, striding through downtown Dallas and congregating at Houston City Hall.

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The High Five

KERA takes a look at five stories that have North Texas talking — buzz from DFW and across the state.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

An inauguration protest in Washington, D.C., turned confrontational on Friday, as several hundred black-clad protesters broke windows and police responded with pepper spray and a concussive device.

The interim chief of the Metropolitan Police Department, Peter Newsham, said 217 protesters have been arrested, and 6 officers sustained minor injuries.

Blog: Coverage Of Inauguration Day 2017

Jan 20, 2017
Carlos Barria / Reuters

Hundreds of thousands of people gathered on the Capitol steps and the national Mall for Donald Trump's inauguration Friday.

Jim Bourg / Reuters

Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States on Friday. NPR's politics team, with help from journalists across the newsroom, produced a live annotation of his remarks.

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The top local stories this morning from KERA News: Federal officials will return to Texas late next month to continue investigating whether the state deliberately excluded students from receiving special education services.

Robert Anderson

A Fort Worth plastic surgeon just returned from a 7,000-mile house call to Lebanon. Dr. Robert Anderson spent more than a week there with Dallas-based LEAP Global Missions, treating displaced Syrians living in refugee camps. What he saw, he says, was devastating.

Rick Wilking / Reuters

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Five Texans in Congress are skipping the inauguration; Rick Perry regrets his “oops” moment; the lease is up for a Dallas artist residency; and more.

President-elect Donald Trump plans to hit the ground running. He could sign his first executive orders within hours of taking the oath of office.

"I've asked my transition team to develop a list of executive actions we can take on Day 1 to restore our laws and bring back our jobs," Trump said in a videotaped message in November. "It's about time."

Vice President-elect Mike Pence echoed that message in a meeting with reporters on Thursday.

"Our job is to be ready on Day 1," Pence said. "We are all ready to go to work."

The incoming president has promised to:

"The Oath." It sounds like the name of a book, and indeed, there have been many volumes with that name. But none more relevant this week than The Oath specified in the Constitution for the president of the United States when he takes office.

The 35 words in Article II, Section I, of the Constitution read as follows:

"I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States."

President-elect Donald Trump takes office on Friday having largely failed to address concerns about the many conflicts of interest posed by his business interests.

Although Trump has settled a few of the outstanding legal and regulatory disputes hanging over him, he remains in the unusual position of presiding over countless policy decisions that will affect his own businesses.

Check Out NPR's Award Winning Journalism Of 2016

Jan 19, 2017

NPR journalists provide great storytelling and rigorous reporting. And that gets noticed. In 2016 many NPR journalists and programs were recognized with awards for investigative reports, outstanding features and series, digital innovations and bodies of coverage. This year's honors include the George Foster Peabody Award presented by the Grady College of Journalism, the Alfred I. duPont­-Columbia University Award presented by the Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, the Edward R.

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Latest from NPR

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CDC/James Gathany

Despite the medical advances of the past century, malaria is still a global scourge. According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 429,000 people died of malaria worldwide in 2015, and there were over 200 million new cases.

A passenger train leapt the tracks overnight in southeast India, killing at least 39 people and injuring more than 60. The derailment, which occurred near Kuneru station in the state of Andhra Pradesh, is the latest in a string of deadly wrecks to rack the Indian railway system.

The derailment threw several coaches of the Hirakhand Express train off its own tracks and onto an adjacent goods train.

Republicans plan to turn control of Medicaid over to the states as part of their replacement for the Affordable Care Act, according to an adviser to President Donald Trump.

With no shortage of material to work with, Saturday Night Live satirized a packed week in American politics, reiterating themes imparted by critics for months.

The episode kicked off by lampooning Russia's role in influencing the U.S. election.

Since it opened 50 years ago, the Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic has been a refuge — for everyone from flower children to famous rock stars to Vietnam War veterans returning home addicted to heroin.

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Here Are 39 Things You Should Do In Texas Before You Die

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a bucket list of things you should do in the Lone Star state before you kick the bucket.

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In-Depth Interviews

History, science, politics, books and more with KERA's Krys Boyd.

Vital Signs

KERA's ongoing series on common health issues.