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Shelby Knowles / Texas Tribune

Texas House Approves Bathroom Restrictions For Transgender Students

Amid threats of a special legislative session over the “bathroom bill,” the Texas House on Sunday took a last-minute vote and approved a proposal that would keep transgender students from using school bathrooms in line with their gender identity.

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The High Five

KERA takes a look at five stories that have North Texas talking — buzz from D-FW and across the state.

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The top local stories this evening from KERA News:

Dallas County Commissioner John Wiley Price will not be retried on any charges related to his case, federal prosecutors announced Friday.  The jury in the federal corruption trial of John Wiley Price has found the longtime Dallas County Commissioner not guilty on seven of 11 counts, including bribery and mail fraud. 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

John Wiley Price is now completely free of the federal corruption charges that dogged him for years.

Updated at 8:19 p.m. ET

Former FBI Director James Comey has agreed to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee in an open session.

"The Committee looks forward to receiving testimony from the former Director on his role in the development of the Intelligence Community Assessment on Russian interference in the 2016 US elections, and I am hopeful that he will clarify for the American people recent events that have been broadly reported in the media," Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., said in a statement released Friday evening.

John Wiley Price
LM Otero / AP Photo

Update, May 19: Dallas County Commissioner John Wiley Price will not be retried on any charges related to his case, federal prosecutors announced Friday. Last month, 67-year-old Price was found not guilty on seven of 11 counts.

Prosecutors are also dropping their case against political consultant Kathy Nealy, Price's longtime associate who was accused of bribing him.

Bill To Ban Texting While Driving In Texas Clears Senate

May 19, 2017
Tim Park for The Texas Tribune

Legislation that would create a statewide texting while driving ban overcame a last-ditch attempt in the Senate on Friday to gut the bill. The bill's author, state Rep. Tom Craddick, R-Midland, said he will concur with the changes the Senate made. The measure will then head to Gov. Greg Abbott's desk.

From Texas Standard:

On its current path, the Dallas police and fire pension fund would run out of money in 10 years, leaving thousands of public safety pensioners in the lurch.

From Texas Standard:

The end may be near for straight-ticket voting in Texas. House Bill 25, which would ban the practice, passed out of the Senate Thursday. It's got one more stop in the lower chamber before heading to Gov. Greg Abbott's desk. Prominent Democrats are decrying the bill – saying it would dilute Democratic votes.

Joshua Roberts / Reuters

A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit against the city of Irving and its school district filed by the father of Ahmed Mohamed, the teenager whose homemade clock was mistaken for a bomb.

A family attorney said Friday that they would file a new lawsuit, The Associated Press reports.

Here's A Roundup Of Bills Addressing Sexual Assault At Texas Colleges, Universities

May 19, 2017
KUT News

The Legislature is set to give final approval on bills addressing sexual assault at Texas colleges and universities. Lawmakers are making campus sexual assaults a top priority this session following some major headlines around the state. 

Texas House Backs Proposal Requiring Seat Belts On School Buses

May 19, 2017
Eric Schlegel

The Texas House on Thursday tentatively backed legislation that would require three-point seat belts be installed on newly-purchased school buses across the state.

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One Crisis Away: No Place To Go

West Dallas has been on the financial edge for generations. And that's just now starting to change.

Latest from NPR

The ransomware attack on worldwide computer networks earlier this month largely spared those of the federal government. While the government dodged a bullet this time, experts say, its systems are still vulnerable — although perhaps less so than in the past.

When the global malware attack — dubbed "WannaCry" — was first detected, a government cybersecurity response group moved quickly.

Building a better battery is the Holy Grail for people who want better technology. Now researchers at the University of Texas at Austin say they may have found that battery — or something close. But their claims have sparked controversy.

At the center of this debate is a towering figure in the world of science — John Goodenough, who teaches material science at the university.

Refugees make headlines. Internally displaced people don't.

Maybe their plight eludes the limelight because, unlike refugees, they don't cross international borders ... or seek to enter the United States or Western Europe, where people debate how many of them to let in ... or undertake harrowing voyages across the Mediterranean.

And maybe it's because of their official label. "Internally displaced persons" (also known as IDPs) sounds vague and a bit confusing, as if they were lost inside themselves.

In November 1969, Richard Oakes and dozens of his fellow Native American activists came ashore at Alcatraz. The little island in San Francisco Bay had lain dormant since 1963, when its infamous federal prison had been shut down, and the group Oakes led set out to claim the land as its own.

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Dinuka Liyanawatte/Reuters

No great power is complete without troops, warships and missiles sprinkled around the planet.

Now China is squeaking into an exclusive club — joining America, Russia, France, and few others in operating at least one military base thousands of miles from its home turf.

Behold China’s very first overseas outpost. It’s in Djibouti, a tiny African nation near Ethiopia. This small naval base is about the size of California’s Disneyland Park. It sits on a sun-roasted patch of desert scrubland off the Gulf of Aden, just off the Arabian Sea.

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Here Are 39 Things You Should Do In Texas Before You Die

Texas Independence Day is March 2. (On that day, back in 1836, the Texas Declaration of Independence was adopted at Washington-on-the-Brazos.) So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a list of things you should do in the Lone Star State before you kick the bucket.

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In-Depth Interviews

History, science, politics, books and more with KERA's Krys Boyd.

Race, Poverty And The Changing Face Of Schools

Take a deep dive into how four different high schools in North Texas have changed over the decades.